Snappy Shark

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About Snappy Shark

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    Advanced Member

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Boston, MA
  • Interests
    early-morning CrossFit, breathing deeply, politics, eating.
  1. I LOVE bananas. I don't do a whole lot of fruit when I'm W30ing, but I have come to reallllly enjoy a nice, ripe, yellow banana with my salad a few days a week (especially on days when I do a metcon at CrossFit) in my riding-my-own-bike life. Do I need them? No. Are they as healthy as veggies? No again. Do I have enough self-control to eat one with my three-cups-of-raw-veggies and pulled pork and not go off the deep end on a sugar binge? Yes.
  2. Ahhhh, the "low-carb" and "no-carb" interpretation of W30 drives me nuts! What people *mean* to say (I think) is no REFINED carbohydrates. I frequently encounter people who say things like, "oh, you couldn't eat that because of the carbs" or "bananas aren't paleo"? What?! My rant is completely beside the point of your post - I did actually come here to say congratulations and "good on you"! Glad that you got a positive reaction.
  3. You're the only one who can answer this question! I've been doing this for about nine months and have a couple of Whole30s under my belt. After my first Whole30, I waited about four months (until the Christmas holidays) to test the effects of off-plan foods on my body. Breaking out and reverting back to the depression that I used to experience 90% of the time are NOT worth it for me. But you know how I figured that out? I ate a bunch of cookies and cake. I'm not saying that you should go on an Easter bender with Cadbury cream eggs and Jelly Belly just because you're "allowed" to now, but this is a very personal question that I recommend you explore in your post-W30 life. A lot of folks around here talk about "riding your own bike,", which means taking accountability for your food choices without torturing yourself about it, but also not feeling physically ill for days because you wanted some candy. The only way to get there is to try some things, say, "hey, that doesn't work for me" and move on. Look, you've already demonstrated that you have the willpower to complete this program. That's HUGE! If you get derailed, you know exactly how to get back on track. There's a reason it's not W365. I STILL struggle with this, but I've done enough experimentation to know that a Lara bar and a few extra pieces of fruit in a day are treats that don't totally wreck me. You'll figure it out eventually, too. Good luck, and happy health!
  4. I can't believe that people throw these away! The first time I heard of this was on this forum. Eat your broccoli stalks, everyone! (Or send them to me so I can eat them!)
  5. Sugar and dairy (except butter) make me break out. It's one of those things that I know going into a less-than-optimal food choice and the week I'll spend trying to get my skin back on track usually helps me decide whether what I want to nom on isactually that delicious.
  6. For what it's worth, my only real SERIOUS off-roading in my post-W30 life was with a plethora of Christmas cookies, bundt cake and s'mores (all in one sitting!) and my stomach was absolutely fine. No bloating, no cramping. However, I spent the next 24 hours sobbing, unable to leave my house or do anything other than feel helpless, crestfallen and depressed (which is scarily reminiscent of my life as a low-fat vegetarian). Similarly, I've found that gluten-free baked goods don't upset my stomach at all (and ONE GF brownie or cookie or whatever doesn't send me into a tantrum like my holiday bender did) , but do cause me to break out with acne and dry patches on my face/arms. We all react to SAD food differently, and it sounds like your HCB experience gave you some valuable information to help you make informed decisions about what foods to eat/avoid in the future. Feel better!
  7. Ooof. I am sorry to hear that. This happened to me shortly after my first Whole30 too (rancid mushrooms!), and I probably would have gone right for the saltines if I had enough energy to get out of the house. Salty bone broth (preferably homemade) was a godsend to me while getting my stomach back on track and helped with the electrolyte depletion. In place of the sugary sports drink junk, you could try (a no-sugar-added) coconut water, which has some of the same benefits as a Gatorade without all of the added crap. I also made a kind of "gingerale," which was just plain seltzer water with lemon + lime slices and lots of fresh, grated ginger. The only thing that was palatable to me during my 3-4 days of recovery were mashed sweet potatoes in bone broth and bananas. I'd say do the best you can with compliant foods and get yourself back on track with the meal template once you're feeling like yourself again. Get well soon!
  8. Yuuuup, nuts may not be your friend. I gave up nuts for my second Whole30 and found significant improvements in my digestion/propensity to bloat. 2 handfuls of nuts is quite a bit, especially if your gut does not agree with them! In addition to upping the veggies (coconut-oil-fried green cabbage at breakfast topped with boiled eggs is my most favorite way to start the day), try to limit your nut consumption to every other day - or cut them out entirely!
  9. Sorry for the delayed response - just wanted to say "thanks" to both of you. This whole body image thing is a work in process, and I am definitely still figuring it out. You both rock!
  10. Are you near a grocery or convenience store? You might be able to get something compliant but not-ideal - some fruit and nuts or canned fish, for example - to hold you over until the end of the day. Good luck and let us know how it turns out!
  11. I have been much more of a lurker on these boards as of late, but I wanted to share a few thoughts that I have on Day 30, #2. My first Whole30 in August of 2012 rescued me from a very screwed up place nutritionally: that is, mostly-vegetarian, low-fat, calorie-counting, Weight-Watcher, food-fearing misery. Since then, I have continued to eat 90-95% Whole30-style while getting quite into CrossFit. In the last eight months I have piled close to 15 pounds onto my 5'7" frame - most of it solid muscle that's helping me throw barbells around in ways that I never thought possible. While I no longer fit into my old "skinny" jeans, eating Real Food has helped me to come to terms with the fact that I 1). probably shouldn't be a size 4; and 2). am a much happier, more functional person when I weigh more and am not malnourished. My goals for Round 2 were to examine some interesting habits I'd developed surrounding nuts (see also: eating an entire bag of raw cashews in a weekend), and see if I couldn't get my sleep back on track (waking up at 2:14 am to check the CrossFit WOD on the iPhone does not make for a good day at work) by eliminating coffee - even decaf! - and my beloved green tea. Here are some of my thoughts my second time around: What was positive: I love to cook this way, so it was fun to really focus on making delicious food I was excited about eating. I didn't have a crock pot for Round 1, so I treated myself with at least one roast per week. My favorite was leg of lamb - delish! Oh, the sleep. I noticed better sleep by Day 3, and the last three weeks have been blissful. I am planning to re-introduce caffeine over the coming days, but I think that my days of (caffeinated, anyway) coffee and tea are over. I'm a little sad about that. Gym performance. I love how complementary eating clean is to kicking butt in the box. I felt like a superwoman most of the time. This time, my sister did the program with me. The support and accountability were GREAT to have, and something I really missed the first time. What was difficult: Honestly, not much, and not very often. I've been eating this way for such a long time that every time I felt tempted to go off the rails I thought to myself, "now how would this fit into my meal template?" It's a LOT easier to ignore temptations if you just remind yourself that it's not veggie, healthy fat or animal protein - don't need it! The special gentleman in my life (who loves to eat what I cook...as well as brownies, donuts and scones) voluntarily gave up drinking for the month with me, which was great. However, I will admit that I felt a little antsy watching him dunk a homemade baked good into his coffee with cream, after we'd shared a beautiful Whole30-style Saturday breakfast. I got over it pretty quickly (see above). The CRAVINGS. I have to say I was really taken aback by thoughts and dreams that I had this time around. I was so nutrient-starved the first time I did a Whole30 that I didn't experience any of the "classic" Day 10-20 withdrawal symptoms, because I was too busy dreaming about juicy burgers and roasted chickens. This time? Man oh man. I had nightmares about eating entire pizzas, being force-fed non-compliant meals (and being chased down personally by Dallas and Melissa - hah) and accidentally sipping on booze - things I haven't touched in almost a year. Weird. Not having the caffeine crutch meant that I had to tough out a few days where I was feeling really, really bad. This has underscored the importance of getting good sleep. What was negative: I admittedly have a disordered eating history, so it's hard to know how valid this is, but I do still struggle with body image in my new lifestyle. I am so proud of the gains in physical strength and health that I've accomplished via Whole30, but sometimes I just miss how it feels to be thin. I am still putting on weight, and I am sometimes shocked at how much food I need to eat to quell my monstrous post-workout appetites. Maybe it's not fair to put this as a "negative" because it's more of an ongoing struggle/conversation that I have with myself regardless of whether I'm in the middle of a Whole30 or not. If there's anyone out there who has words of wisdom in this area, I'd really appreciate it. I'd love to just be happy with being a strong, healthy woman, instead of wishing I was a thin, small woman. All-in-all, after having done this program twice now, I like the idea of doing a Whole30 every few months to get myself back on track, but I don't worry so much about going so crazy that I need the stringency to make good choices. I know that eating this way is my "normal" and I'm not threatened by the occasional off-plan food choice - maybe it's a little bit like being past the honey-moon stage, where you just understand that the relationship takes work but is an overwhelmingly positive entity that deserves attention and consideration (even if it's hard sometimes!). Whole30 and I are kind of married. Also, I think it's safe to say that nuts and I are not friends - I am banishing those little suckers to the island where all of the other not-so-bad-but-not-for-me foods live (right next to the dates and coconut butter). Special occasions and emergencies only. My sister just brought me a celebratory gluten-free brownie - and it was worth every bite.
  12. For what it's worth, I'm in the middle of my second Whole30 (have been eating 90-95% compliant for close to 9 months now) and had a massive eczema outbreak around Day 5. It's only just starting to heal now. I have a history of weird skin sensitivities that I don't think are related to diet. The outbreak coincided with a pretty bad snowstorm and I think that the cold weather and wind was probably the trigger. Whole30 did cure my horrendous cankersores, though! Also, about the nuts - my second W30 has been nut- and caffeine-free. I didn't have enough willpower to try eliminating them in Round 1, but I can now say with certainty that nuts are not a good thing for me to eat. I'd try cutting them out for a week and see how you feel. There are many more nutritious sources of fat than almonds or cashews, especially if you think they're upsetting your stomach. Feel better!
  13. Some musings from a former portion counter/Weight Watcher... I gained weight on my Whole30 (about five months ago at this point) - and I needed to. I was about two steps away from a full-blown eating disorder when I found Dallas and Melissa (thank goodness), and I am still thanking my lucky stars that I'm no longer trying to maintain a caloric deficit while being so proud of myself for squeezing my 5'7" frame into size 4 skinny jeans (which have since found a new home at Goodwill). Anyway. 99% of what I eat is in the spirit of the Whole30. By that, I mean that I still don't count/weigh/track anything and I structure all of my meals after the meal-planning template to the very best of my availability. I cook/meal-prepare the same way that I did when I was on a Whole30, but I don't stress about "sneaky junk" like small amounts of sugars or bad oils when I'm eating out, which is a very rare event anyway. I will also have some (soy-free) dark chocolate on special occasions, a glass of red wine a few times per month. No gluten or dairy (besides butter) under any circumstances. It's nice to be relaxed and comfortable in my eating habits - I don't stress out about what to eat anymore, and in the rare event that I can't construct a meal more or less along the lines of the template I know that the next thing I cook myself will be nutritious and balanced. I'm curious about what you mean when you say that you overate. Are you an athlete? Did you find that you ate more at different times of your cycle (if you're a woman)? Since you mentioned a history of disordered eating, I just wanted to encourage you to ask yourself those questions before you start thinking about Zoning or restricting portions of Whole30-compliant foods, etc. I had a very unhealthy concept of portion sizes prior to finding W30 so it's possible that you're not actually overeating. As a side note, I'm curious about people who gain weight eating Whole30 style. I am a CrossFitter and have gained about 15 pounds since I started doing WODs and eating W30. I know that extra weight is helping me throw barbells around, but I think it took me a while to get over the fact that W30 will not make you thin - it will help your body get to a healthy set point, which for many of us (especially women) will not look like what you can accomplish on a calorie restrictive approach like WW or Zone. Just my two cents. Keep us posted, RevKT, and DON'T STRESS!
  14. Yeah, I don't see how that could be considered anything but SWYPO. Save it for after your Whole30!
  15. I have substituted a couple of tablespoons of apple cider vinegar for red wine when cooking tough cuts of beef with a lot of success...just made pot roast from brisket this weekend and it worked like a charm! The purpose of the wine is flavor, but also (chemically) to acidify the dish. Vinegar usually does the trick (and apple cider vinegar is just the tastiest, in my opinion).