Rachel923

Animals fed corn and soy?

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I'm browsing on uswellness meats' website and I'm noticing that some of the meat products come from animals that were fed corn and soy.I also see the same issue with the eggs I'm buying. I found one brand at Whole Foods that seemed right, but at 8 dollars a dozen, they're cost prohibitive! (I went through 2 dozen eggs in my first 3 days) Does this make a big difference - will it nullify what I'm trying to achieve with the whole 30? Sorry if this topic has been addressed - I did a search and came up with nothing.

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You are okay to eat the meat from animals that ate corn and soy. Animals are healthier when they eat their natural diet (not corn and soy), but their meat is still good for you even if they are not totally grass-fed, earthworms, veggie scraps, etc.

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There's a distinction that needs to be made among meat. Ruminants (cattle, sheep, goats) can be raised on pasture/browse alone. They can get all the energy they need that way and are healthiest that way. However, monogastrics (poultry, pigs) are omnivores and not built to only eat grass. That would be like asking you to subsist on lettuce. Birds are definitely meant to consume grain. For pigs, it would be a much smaller portion of their natural diet, and mostly seasonal. However, feeding pigs a diet that is not built on grain and soy is extremely challenging these days (Sugar Mountain Farm in Vermont is very prominent on the internet and does raise grain free hogs, but he feeds them quite a bit of whey, which is certainly less 'natural' for an adult hog to eat.) So for monogastrics, 'pastured' is the key word to look for. That way, they have their grain ration, but can harvest their own diverse natural diet to supplement it. 

 

When starting my farm, I initially tried to get a feed with no corn or soy. For protein, you cannot feed them meat/meat byproduct if you are selling them (even though that would be natural fodder for them). Fish meal makes them taste like fish. No mill in my area carries forage peas and if I grew my own, I'd have to invest in a way to mill them. As for corn, most other grains are less ideal in terms of digestive issues they cause for pigs (and birds). Most non-grain carb sources are very seasonal. Ultimately, I decided to stick with standard grain rations (though I did find non-GMO) until better options become available. In the meantime, I'm going to try to grow/wild harvest more and more non-grain/soy feed for them each year! 

 

Sorry about the lengthy post, just trying to clear up this common misconception and make your meat buying much simpler!

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