GraceMelodie

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About GraceMelodie

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  1. I recommend reading a variety of books about nutrition and longevity so you can use all of the information you have learned to create a diet that you can happily and easily live with for the long-term. I highly recommend reading some of Michale Pollan's books. Also, throw away your scale. You don't need to know how much you weigh. I have completed several Whole30s over the last couple of years but I do not follow a strict Whole30 diet every day. It is simply too restrictive. I focus on eating 3 balanced meals a day with lots of veggies, fruits, protein, fat and carbs. I don't snack and I
  2. It sounds like you have quite a few NSVs: less cravings, better muscle tone, and better skin complexion! Extending your clean eating for another week or two definitely won't hurt you but ultimately you want to "find your food freedom" especially since you had issues with restrictive eating. If you truly are not missing anything you left out, maybe your "food freedom" is eating well everyday and eating all the healthy, nourishing food emphasized in the program. If you are really missing something that is whole and minimally processed, such as lentils or beans or oatmeal, reintroduce them and
  3. You could try eating more fruit, especially prunes to see if that helps. This month I tried intermittent fasting (I don't eat from 8:00 pm - 11:30 am but I drink coffee, tea and water during this time) while keeping my other two meals Whole30 compliant. A couple times a week I eat walnuts as my protein for lunch but eat animal protein for all my other lunches and dinners. My body responds well to this approach. Bottom line, Whole30 is a healthy place to start but everybody is different and our bodies respond uniquely to our diets. Once you have finished the 30 days, I encourage y