jpketz

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  1. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from CaseyD in Depression/Anxiety? Any Whole30 successes?   
    Just wanted to update any of you who have generously shared your thoughts and concern about my nephew that there is good news to report. He's just finished his seventh week of eating Paleo and is having some dramatic results; he's sleeping better, has his anxiety under control (no significant attacks since eating Paleo), has lost some weight (he's a big boy, former wrestler and football player who was pushing 320 a few months ago). He says he can now actually "use" his bathroom scale because he doesn't max it out.
    We didn't ended up having him live here or do much hands on beyond preparing a pretty expansive PDF with recipes and shopping tips for him (which may end up becoming a min-Paleo cookbook for picky eaters).
    Anyway, it may be a while before he attempts a W30 but at least he's off sugar and wheat and has severely limited his caffeine and dairy. And, the boy is learning to cook vegetables, which for a single guy who has eaten a "beige" diet his whole life, is huge! An adjective he may no longer use to describe himself if he keeps it up. But most important, the anxiety attacks/panic attacks are being managed with diet alone, finally, which is opening up a window for success.
  2. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  3. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  4. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  5. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from CaseyD in Depression/Anxiety? Any Whole30 successes?   
    Just wanted to update any of you who have generously shared your thoughts and concern about my nephew that there is good news to report. He's just finished his seventh week of eating Paleo and is having some dramatic results; he's sleeping better, has his anxiety under control (no significant attacks since eating Paleo), has lost some weight (he's a big boy, former wrestler and football player who was pushing 320 a few months ago). He says he can now actually "use" his bathroom scale because he doesn't max it out.
    We didn't ended up having him live here or do much hands on beyond preparing a pretty expansive PDF with recipes and shopping tips for him (which may end up becoming a min-Paleo cookbook for picky eaters).
    Anyway, it may be a while before he attempts a W30 but at least he's off sugar and wheat and has severely limited his caffeine and dairy. And, the boy is learning to cook vegetables, which for a single guy who has eaten a "beige" diet his whole life, is huge! An adjective he may no longer use to describe himself if he keeps it up. But most important, the anxiety attacks/panic attacks are being managed with diet alone, finally, which is opening up a window for success.
  6. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from praxisproject in Depression/Anxiety? Any Whole30 successes?   
    @CaseyD. Great feedback. Thank you!!
  7. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from MeadowLily in Depression/Anxiety? Any Whole30 successes?   
    @NatPatJen. Thanks for sharing your thoughts about this. I appreciate the point you're making.
    A this point any movement toward a cleaner diet would have tangible results for his anxiety, I'm sure, at least in terms of frequency. When he eats a pound of cookie dough at 9 p.m. and then wakes up at 3 a.m. with an anxiety attack...uh..yeah...that comes under the heading of "if it hurts don't do that."
    The longer term solution requires a more solid commitment to changing his relationship to sugar and gluten, et al, and if W30 wasn't so effective at producing those results, I'd recommend a more incremental approach. But as they say in the book, "it's just not THAT hard". It's a few weeks of feeling like crap (probably not a lot worse than he already feels) but it gets better. And with all the support he has at his disposal, I think the resistance is part anticipation of an increase in anxiety, and part because none of this has become painful enough (hit bottom)...yet. And I'm framing this in "addiction" terms because I'm sure that's largely what's driving him. It's a Catch 22, no doubt. And it's hard to watch, not just for me, but especially his dad, his siblings, and friends.
    I feel a little like I'm bending some boundaries by talking about this so much in public but for me, this forum, and the comments I've received on this thread, have been tremendously supportive. It's great to be able to share the insights of folks who have a more intimate experience with anxiety, eating disorder, addiction, than I do. Well maybe anxiety. The other two, I know from.
  8. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from praxisproject in Depression/Anxiety? Any Whole30 successes?   
    @katyroq. Thanks so much for the update. What you're saying further reinforces my suspicion that sugar is the culprit in my nephew's case, in all its forms, from morning bagel to after dinner cookie dough. And now, a fairly recent development, drinking in order to get to sleep, which is a setback, unfortunately. It's hard to watch him resort to short-term fixes that will certainly make his issues worse in the long-term, but there you go.
    So I've decided to keep on providing him as much information as I can (unless he asks me to stop), hoping that the old adage "Knowledge is Power" works in his case. He is making strides to clean up his diet a little, so there's hope, but the new drinking revelation is a step backward. Oy. Kids. ( I mean that in the nicest possible way ).
    Thank you for taking the time to share your experience. I'm encouraged by your thoughtfulness and courage in the face of all this. Hang in there and know you at least have support from this forum and me in particular.
  9. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from CaseyD in Depression/Anxiety? Any Whole30 successes?   
    Just wanted to update any of you who have generously shared your thoughts and concern about my nephew that there is good news to report. He's just finished his seventh week of eating Paleo and is having some dramatic results; he's sleeping better, has his anxiety under control (no significant attacks since eating Paleo), has lost some weight (he's a big boy, former wrestler and football player who was pushing 320 a few months ago). He says he can now actually "use" his bathroom scale because he doesn't max it out.
    We didn't ended up having him live here or do much hands on beyond preparing a pretty expansive PDF with recipes and shopping tips for him (which may end up becoming a min-Paleo cookbook for picky eaters).
    Anyway, it may be a while before he attempts a W30 but at least he's off sugar and wheat and has severely limited his caffeine and dairy. And, the boy is learning to cook vegetables, which for a single guy who has eaten a "beige" diet his whole life, is huge! An adjective he may no longer use to describe himself if he keeps it up. But most important, the anxiety attacks/panic attacks are being managed with diet alone, finally, which is opening up a window for success.
  10. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from MeadowLily in Depression/Anxiety? Any Whole30 successes?   
    @NatPatJen. Thanks for sharing your thoughts about this. I appreciate the point you're making.
    A this point any movement toward a cleaner diet would have tangible results for his anxiety, I'm sure, at least in terms of frequency. When he eats a pound of cookie dough at 9 p.m. and then wakes up at 3 a.m. with an anxiety attack...uh..yeah...that comes under the heading of "if it hurts don't do that."
    The longer term solution requires a more solid commitment to changing his relationship to sugar and gluten, et al, and if W30 wasn't so effective at producing those results, I'd recommend a more incremental approach. But as they say in the book, "it's just not THAT hard". It's a few weeks of feeling like crap (probably not a lot worse than he already feels) but it gets better. And with all the support he has at his disposal, I think the resistance is part anticipation of an increase in anxiety, and part because none of this has become painful enough (hit bottom)...yet. And I'm framing this in "addiction" terms because I'm sure that's largely what's driving him. It's a Catch 22, no doubt. And it's hard to watch, not just for me, but especially his dad, his siblings, and friends.
    I feel a little like I'm bending some boundaries by talking about this so much in public but for me, this forum, and the comments I've received on this thread, have been tremendously supportive. It's great to be able to share the insights of folks who have a more intimate experience with anxiety, eating disorder, addiction, than I do. Well maybe anxiety. The other two, I know from.
  11. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from MeadowLily in Depression/Anxiety? Any Whole30 successes?   
    I should be more clear...I regard sugar and gluten to be interchangeable for the sake of most discussions. The fact that wheat turns to sugar in a few seconds after entering the mouth and that a piece of whole wheat bread has more of a glycemic impact than a Snicker's Bar means for all intents and purposes, it's the same stuff. For me, that Snicker's bar and a half a loaf of sourdough bread have the same power to create a binge. And I see the same pattern in my nephew. I think it's almost a slam dunk that if sugar is a problem, gluten is too, and giving up one without the other is like saying you're going to get sober, you're just going to drink beer. (I've actually heard that one more than once!)
    I complete agree with Kresser, btw.
  12. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  13. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  14. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  15. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  16. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  17. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  18. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  19. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  20. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  21. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  22. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Had to chime in and agree wholeheartedly with Robin.
    One of the hardest things to do is to keep an otherwise smart person from overthinking. And when you assemble a whole bunch of smart people (like this community) then the temptation is to REALLY overthink things and even sometimes "co-overthink" things. (©co-overthink. New term. Thank you). which may explain 4 pages of forum posts on the relative merits of protein powder and bullet-proof coffee (not together). Not that I haven't enjoyed engaging in, and sometimes starting, those esoteric discussions.
    I read a book a few years ago called "Younger Next Year" in which the authors break down their exercise and eating program into the phrase: "Move every day, don't eat crap". While I probably could have used a few more particulars about the "crap" I was supposed to avoid, the "move every day" part got me to the gym at 6:30 a.m. nearly every day for a year. Keeping it simple was exactly what I needed.
    Michael Pollan's now famous prescription for healthy eating, "Eat food, not too much, mainly plants" is another reductionist, yet amazingly helpful mantra that helps me navigate through the often bewildering post-W30 world along with occasional re-reads of ISWF.
    In fact I sometimes REALLYREALLY crave the simplicity of Whole30 because it was so simple. Even though I'm 90% on plan even now, it's still harder out here.
    So to all newbies...enjoy the "freedom" of having a well-defined set of guidelines for 30 days. Try underthinking a little and just enjoy the not eating crap.
  23. Like
    jpketz reacted to Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Robin, I'm going to print this out and keep it. You don't have to address every food related issue you have, break every bad habit, and shun every food that gives you comfort to succeed with your Whole30. I love it, love it, love it. thankyou
  24. Like
    jpketz reacted to Robin Strathdee in Don't over think this.   
    Welcome all newcomers, welcome back vets, and for those of you who never left...welcome to this post.
    I just wanted to pop in here and remind you all to take a deep breath before you dive into all the questions about what you can and can't have. The program guidelines are clear on what you can and can't have (grains, dairy, W30 muffins), but things get a little grey when people start talking about what you should and shouldn't have. Please don't over think think this. You don't have to address every food related issue you have, break every bad habit, and shun every food that gives you comfort to succeed with your Whole30. If you need to you can always extend or repeat the process, and things will get better each time you do. My advice to you is this:

    Stick to the rules like they are your port in a storm (really, they will become that).
    Take the Moderators responses seriously (we know what we're talking about).
    Take community members suggestions as advice from those who came before, but keep in mind they are not the rules and not the Mods. Everyone here is well-meaning, and everyone here wants to see you succeed, but everyone here is at a different place in this journey.
    And finally, take comfort in these words (from Melissa Hartwig, on another forum post):

    Here's the thing (and this is an interesting discussion)... there are Whole30 "rules," which are strict, clearly outlined, and very well defined. No grains - and here are all the things we consider grains. No dairy - and here are all the dairy items excluded. No Paleo-fied food choices, and here's what those look like.
    Then, there are Whole30 suggestions for success. They're not part of the official rules, but they're things that we've seen really help (or harm) people as they move through the program. Fruit smoothies for breakfast - not a good idea. Skipping breakfast - not a good idea. Eating every two hours, all day - not a good idea. These things won't necessarily affect your Whole30 results (although they might), but if we can give you additional suggestions that will make your transition and your program easier and more effective, we're going to give them to you.
    Keep Calm and Whole30 On.
  25. Like
    jpketz got a reaction from CaseyD in Depression/Anxiety? Any Whole30 successes?   
    Just wanted to update any of you who have generously shared your thoughts and concern about my nephew that there is good news to report. He's just finished his seventh week of eating Paleo and is having some dramatic results; he's sleeping better, has his anxiety under control (no significant attacks since eating Paleo), has lost some weight (he's a big boy, former wrestler and football player who was pushing 320 a few months ago). He says he can now actually "use" his bathroom scale because he doesn't max it out.
    We didn't ended up having him live here or do much hands on beyond preparing a pretty expansive PDF with recipes and shopping tips for him (which may end up becoming a min-Paleo cookbook for picky eaters).
    Anyway, it may be a while before he attempts a W30 but at least he's off sugar and wheat and has severely limited his caffeine and dairy. And, the boy is learning to cook vegetables, which for a single guy who has eaten a "beige" diet his whole life, is huge! An adjective he may no longer use to describe himself if he keeps it up. But most important, the anxiety attacks/panic attacks are being managed with diet alone, finally, which is opening up a window for success.