chichi

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  1. Like
    chichi reacted to SunshineBell in Whole30 Yachaejeon (Vegetable Pancake)   
    I think every ethnic group has a similar recipe. In North America there's the frittata, my Jewish friends enjoy latkes and in the Korean culture, there's Yachaejeon - I've had this where there's an egg cracked ontop and other times, flat with nori whipped into the batter. For every culture and every flatten egg like vegetable pancake I've ever eaten, there has never been one I have ever disliked. The basic principle is just use up any vegetable you have in the fridge that can be cut up into strips! Enjoy
    Ingredients - Makes one large 12 inch pancake
    About 3 cups of sliced vegetables
    4 green onions, cut into 1 inch long ⅓ cup leek (optional), sliced thinly 1 inch long 1/2 cup zucchini matchsticks (about 1/2 cup) ⅓ cup white onion, sliced 1/2 cup carrots, peeled and sliced ⅓ cup sweet potato ⅓ cup fresh mushroom (white, baby portobello, or shiitake) Other Ingredients
    1/2 cup potato flour ½ teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon sesame oil ¾ cup water splash of vegetable oil Optional egg for more protein Dipping sauce
    1 tablespoon coconut amino 2 teaspoons rice wine vinegar 1 teaspoon hot pepper flakes, optional 1 teaspoon sesame seeds Directions:
    In a large bowl combine all vegetables and "other ingredients" Heat up a 12-inch non-stick pan over medium/high heat. Add 2 tbs of oil. Coat bottom evenly Once hot, add the batter and spread it out evenly Turn the heat down to medium and let cook for 4-5 minutes Once the bottom is light golden brown flip it over with a spatula Drizzle anther 1-2 tbs of oil down the edges of the pan to help brown the other side Cook for another 3 to 4 minutes. If it is not cooked through, flip it over one more time for a couple of more minutes Sauce:
    While the pancake is cooking in a small bowl whip up the dipping sauce with all the ingredients and set aside.
    Cut the pancake into wedges and serve with dipping sauce. For optional protein I usually serve this with a sunny-side up egg and dip the pancake into the yolk. Yummy
     
  2. Like
    chichi reacted to Lorna from Canada in esophageal strictures/possible chronic allergy   
    I know this is an old post but this is a BIG problem in our family - men and women! I know of 12 people in my late paternal grandmother's side of the family who suffer with this - including her. My dad had to have progressively larger tubes inserted over several weeks to restretch his esophagus because it was so chronically tight. I never considered that it might be a food intolerance because, when it starts happening to me, I am able to deep breathe and relax my way past it - the men in my family tend to try to fight it and it just gets worse and worse. I had an episode a few weeks back that I relaxed through - it does loosen when I do that. Moving forward, I am going to see if there's an allergic reaction happening by paying more attention to what I am eating when it does happen.
    Thanks for raising this issue (if you even see this  )
     
  3. Like
    chichi reacted to heb2014 in Issues with leafy greens   
    Thanks for the comments!  We've narrowed it down a little more for him....it seems to be uncooked spinach and uncooked kale. Lettuce doesn't seem to bother him if he's not eating large quantities - like a side salad is fine.  I think he'd be fine with not eating salads anyway 
  4. Like
    chichi reacted to Rookie in Round 1 Done! Results for a Mid 30's guy   
    Hi everyone. I'm a lurker and first time poster.  I just wanted to thank everyone for this forum.  I browsed it a lot to get me through, and finished my first round of Whole30 yesterday.  I thought I might write a quick post to help someone else someday.

    About me:  I'm a mid 30's guy with a desk job and two kids.  For a decade, I've eaten junk and my body is paying for it.  I'm 5'8".  Ten years ago, I weighed 160.  On January 1, 2018, I weighted 191.8.  I got motivated and started watching what I was eating and walking a fair amount, and through that I dropped about 10 pounds.  Then, over a few months, I was stuck at 182 with no meaningful fluctuation.  I wanted a jump start and decided to try Whole30.
    30 days later, I'm 170.4, which is 11.6 pounds of loss.  More importantly, I feel much better, am motivated to get where I want to be, and am dedicated to healthier eating.  I'm so glad I did this.

    Things I did right:  I stuck to the plan, eating only permitted foods, and didn't break.
    Things I wish I had done: I didn't exercise at all.  I wish I had.  Some days I just felt so tired.  I should have increased fat and pushed through.
    What I relied on too much:  I definitely ate too much fruit and, towards the end, potato. 

    What I learned:  I have self control.  My body is my responsibility.  Also, it turns out I enjoy cooking and I actually like most vegetables.   Who knew?

    What now?  Now I'm in the reentry phase, and I'm going to do that for myself to see if I have any hidden intolerance.  Once I'm done with that - regardless of what it shows - I intend to go minimal dairy, avoid added sugars, and say no to bread for - well - foreever. Also, I'm determined to get back to 160 and reshape my body, so I'm starting a weight training and cardio plan.

    That's about it.  Thanks!
  5. Like
    chichi reacted to Whole Nerdy in Over-50 Whole 30   
    I want to share a bit about what I see as the advantages of Whole 30 eating for people over 50, with one possible caveat.
    A while back when I was a lithe young thing in my thirties, a friend of mine in his mid-fifties sat down heavily on a bench and said to me, "You see, this is what happens when you get older--your muscles get all achy." I remember thinking, Oh, no, I don't want that to be me. Cut to me in my late forties and early fifties--sure enough, I'd wake up in the morning, shuffle my sore limbs to the bathroom, and look back at a puffy face. I just thought it was normal. Then I started a paleo-style diet, and the achiness almost immediately went away. It was dramatic: I could bend over and place my palms on the floor first thing in the morning, which I couldn't have dreamed about before.
    Recently, my sugar habit came back, with a vengeance. I would feel tired and creaky just walking up the stairs. So I did a Whole45, just to really keep the sugar demons at bay. It was a joy to feel the litheness I had felt in my limbs at a young age return. I felt like someone had literally oiled my joints. I am emphasizing this because so many people believe that soreness and lack of flexibility are an inevitable product of old age. It ain't so.
    Another great advantage of Whole30-ing for older people is the way it changes your habits. By the time you've been on the planet for half a century or more, your manner of thinking about food and your style of eating have become pretty well engrained. Your mind may try to be as inflexible as your body once was. We all know from research and from the examples of people around us that changing habits and learning new skills are both an important part of aging well. With Whole30 you have to rethink a lot of things you may have been doing automatically that no longer serve you. This in itself is freeing. 
    What's the caveat? My lipids level zoomed up along with my adoption of the paleo diet--both HDL and LDL increased; my doctors have been pestering me to go on statins. Women lose the protection that estrogen previously gave to their heart when they go through menopause, so heart-released problems often show up at this stage. I am not sure how much this increase in cholesterol had to do with my change in diet or with menopause itself. Probably a combination of both. Now that I have completed my Whole45 I am experimenting with a Mediterranean-style diet--still grain-free, but veering in the direction of fish and lowering my intake of red meat, which is problematic anyway (increases cancer risk in many studies, high carbon footprint). 
    I have learned so much from this Whole45, including how much the foods I eat influence my cognitive and concentration skills. (Hint: much more than I previously thought!) Again, eating the foods that work for me help me to preserve that most precious resource. Good luck to all you at all ages.
     
     
  6. Like
    chichi reacted to PATreeTrimmer in pre-/post-Whole30   
    First, I feel a lot better after the Whole30. My wife and I did it together and the support structure was very much needed, especially during the first few days when the sugar buzz was gone. My clothes fit much better and a few pieces too loose!
    My weight went from 274 to 255 lbs., and my BMI from 35.1 to 32.7. While still too high, I feel confident that I have some control over my weight and will work to continue this trend through diet and exercise. My blood pressure (medicated) has went down as well. That's a bit trickier as I'm also studying tai chi.
  7. Like
    chichi got a reaction from heb2014 in Issues with leafy greens   
    @heb2014 I don't know how you guys are doing now, but I and my partner experienced something similar,--he wasn't even doing the W30, but our together meals changed. It can be frustrating when one person's body reacts totally differently than another person's, but of course, that was the point of this whole thing for me, to figure out what makes you feel your best, and what's seldom worth making yourself feel crappy. It can be kind of disheartening to find it's a 'good for you' food. My husband turned out to have a digestive allergy to raw carrots, and then, when vegetables became a much more significant portion of our meals, we realized he was always having a reaction to cooked carrots, as well, he'd just never eaten a whole bunch of them. Carrots are like my second-favorite vegetable, and he doesn't like my first-favorite! We are careful with all root vegetables with him, parsnips and beets, and it just means that sometimes, I make a big ole batch of something I like, knowing it's just for my lunches, and we are both eating in a way (mostly) that makes us feel good. 
  8. Like
    chichi got a reaction from heb2014 in Issues with leafy greens   
    @heb2014 I don't know how you guys are doing now, but I and my partner experienced something similar,--he wasn't even doing the W30, but our together meals changed. It can be frustrating when one person's body reacts totally differently than another person's, but of course, that was the point of this whole thing for me, to figure out what makes you feel your best, and what's seldom worth making yourself feel crappy. It can be kind of disheartening to find it's a 'good for you' food. My husband turned out to have a digestive allergy to raw carrots, and then, when vegetables became a much more significant portion of our meals, we realized he was always having a reaction to cooked carrots, as well, he'd just never eaten a whole bunch of them. Carrots are like my second-favorite vegetable, and he doesn't like my first-favorite! We are careful with all root vegetables with him, parsnips and beets, and it just means that sometimes, I make a big ole batch of something I like, knowing it's just for my lunches, and we are both eating in a way (mostly) that makes us feel good. 
  9. Like
    chichi reacted to EllieHH in What has been your most lasting food habit after Whole30?   
    Let me tell you - the spaghetti isn't worth it (have attempted this maybe twice in the last 6 months).  The yum is in the sauce anyway and for me the gluten in the noodles messes me up for DAYS and I think "why did I do that?"  Just do the zoodles and be happy for the rest of your life .  
  10. Thanks
    chichi reacted to SugarcubeOD in Thinking of going cold-turkey W30 during the holidays-   
    Hey Frank!
    First, I loved the comment about how missing pasta was easy to get over with a ribeye!  Ain't that the truth! 
    I see where you're coming from in wanting to do Whole30 over the holidays so that there are 'others imposed rules' on what you can and can't eat so that you have a reason to decline things you don't want to eat.  But what if you stood in the power of what you're doing and what YOU want to eat and not eat and let that be enough?  What if you used the time to practice your own food freedom - decline that bread at dinner with a smile on your face and an 'Oh, I'm good, thanks' or whatever phrase comes naturally to you that feels genuine.  Sometimes I think that we think people notice what we eat and don't eat as much as what we notice of ourselves and honestly, if you're gracious and kind when you decline an item you aren't willing to eat, people move on... 
    If you were going to do the Whole30, you really have to be committed to it over the holidays... there's no Whole30+... If you don't think you can decline every item including butter in the mashed potatoes and ask all the questions, don't do a Whole30...
    I think you CAN do one if you wanted to but I also think you're strong enough from what I've read of your posts here that you can create your own plan for the holidays and stick to it and come out in January feeling empowered that you used your own rules and feelings to get through the holidays without falling face first into everything that was offered to you just because you're not on a Whole30.
    We can definitely help you make a plan... there are posts I recall where people put their own 'rules' around holidays such as 'one glass of wine at each party is acceptable - wine when I'm sitting at home by myself is not'.  Or, my fave, 'no alcohol at parties but a glass of wine on Friday night sitting in the dark staring at the Christmas tree is a-ok'.  Decide what's important to you as far as the spirit of the holidays, how you know food makes you feel and what you want to achieve at this festive time and set a playbook.
    Forgive me if I"ve overstepped and misunderstood what it was you were looking for advice wise - always here to chat it out and help you figure out what you want to do and of course whatever you decide, we'll all support you!