Jihanna

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  1. Haha
    Jihanna reacted to SchrodingersCat in SchrodingersCat post-W30 diary!   
    Day 2 of "Dammit, Schrod, stop eating like a bloody teenager whose been left home alone for the week with an unlimited food budget"
    Meal 1: 2 Prosciutto, egg, mushroom and capsicum bites with spicy kraut
    Meal 2: Beef "stoup" with cauli rice
    Meal 3: Chicken and veggie casserole cooked in the slow cooker because I'm a grown-up who has plans after work and instead of making an excuse to grab something takeaway or suboptimal I used my not-inexpensive but completely underutilised slow cooker to ensure that there is something tasty and convenient to come home to.
    I really need to get on some exercise too. I'm in that horrible "I'm too unfit to do what I used to do (taekwondo and running) but am at a loss to know what to do to get back to the level of fitness I need to be to do what I used to do". Plus I have bad knees and tendonitis in my elbow. I'd do aqua aerobics but it's such a time killer, by the time I get there, change, do the class, shower, change, come home, shower properly, it's a 2 hour commitment, minimum. 
  2. Like
    Jihanna reacted to SchrodingersCat in SchrodingersCat post-W30 diary!   
    When I get back on track, and make myself delicious meals, I kick myself all the more for not eating this deliciousness!
  3. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Emma in Whole 30 (July 2)   
    Emma, I write my meal plan based on the sales. The new sales week starts on Wednesday or Thursday for all the local stores I shop, and most (if not all) of them allow you to "preview" the upcoming week... that makes it really nice if I know I'll be super-busy toward the end of the week. So I review the sales and make a notepad file (on my PC) to list what I'm likely to be interested in getting (with the costs and any limits noted); then I'll use that list as reference for making my actual meal plan, and use the meal plan to build my shopping list.
    It takes time and thought, but it helps SO MUCH because it means we're saving money and I'm not buying a bunch of food that'll go to waste.
    I try to stock up on things when they're on a super-sale, too, since that'll keep my grocery expenses lower for an upcoming week... but I haven't yet gotten to a point where I can go full-bulk with my purchases.
    Good luck on getting started with it again!
  4. Like
    Jihanna reacted to coachmandiep in Allison's Whole 30 Log   
    I hear ya, I am the same way.  I also come from a background of serial dieting.  I am still a work in progress, but what I have found is that I needed to change my mindset.  When I feel that I made a poor decision I do a quick analysis of why it happened.  Was I not prepared (no plan)?  Was I stressed, sad, angry, tired or happy and wanting to celebrate?  Did my day go differently than planned?  Did I keep eating something that wasn't "worth it"?  Once I figure out why I made the decision, I can think through what I will do differently next time. 
    I have become better at meal planning and sticking with my plan, not soothing myself or celebrating with food, keeping emergency food on hand, and stopping if the first bite isn't "worth it".  I am the first to admit that there are times that I still make a decision that bites me in the bum, but I now look at it as information.  I have come a long way since my dieting days and am in a much happier place.  I know you can change your mindset as well.  Gather your Food Freedom information, (this phase is ongoing), and create an action plan based on your "data".  As you change your mindset and your habits, your confidence will grow.  You've got it!
     
  5. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Sarah_MT in Starting July 8th and Preparing for All the Suck   
    One of the funniest things that I've found happening to me after Whole30 is when I go out to eat and find myself comparing my ordered food to how I'd make it or something similar at home (since I stay paleo or Whole30 compliant at home, just about always)... and of course, I assume my way would taste better because, you know, kitchen confidence (yay NSV). In some cases, knowing my at-home versions are as good if not better actively prevents me from ordering certain things now, because I know good and well that I won't enjoy it as much as I would at home, even with not having to cook and clean up!
    It feels almost insane, sometimes, but the "compliance-comparison" actually saves me from making food freedom decisions that I'm not certain I will (or should) enjoy... because if I don't enjoy it fully, it simply isn't worth it.
    That happened a lot with burgers, because I almost always figure I'd enjoy my homemade 5-ingredient burgers more than basically any burger I could get from a restaurant (they're definitely better than any fast food burger I've tasted and I haven't bothered with any from a sit-down place since my Whole30). I also prefer homemade barbecue when compared to most places (there are one or two that I'd take theirs over mine, but that's just the meat, I skip the sauce entirely). Slaw, most soups, meatloaf, mashed potatoes, etc. Sometimes I have to force my brain to shush so I can actually enjoy my meal in peace (knowing I'll mull over it later)!
    Granted, there are things that are way beyond what I could do at home; but those are things I can consider writing into my Food Freedom, so I'm able to enjoy them without having to cook them at home. Buffets are occasionally part of my Food Freedom as well, but only if I'm not alone -- I'll be less likely to overeat if I'm with someone else, and knowing we'll have drastically different plates is part of what makes it worth it (big variety, but not a huge kitchen prep and cleanup effort from me).
  6. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Kris22 in Starting July 8th and Preparing for All the Suck   
    I just thought I'd pop in to give a few thoughts on stress relief and being excited over food...
    When I'm stressed, one of the first things I usually reach for is aromatherapy (essential oils), sometimes paired with a shower or bath. Music also helps me -- I've got a handful of YouTube playlists set up (different types of music for different moods), and iHeartRadio is something I've started using recently since I can play my favorite radio station or listen to stations based on a few specific artists I enjoy. Relaxing in a pool is one of my absolute favorite ways to unwind, though I don't get to do it often (a bath is about as close as I get except a few times per year, I'm afraid).
    If I absolutely want to kill all the things and nothing else is helping, I go kill all the things... really! I enjoy playing video games sometimes, and I've got a few that are fun to just go in and kill stuff when the urge strikes. I don't spend hours and hours at them, but it definitely helps sometimes to just go spend an hour (if that) going absolutely nuts in a way that (while not productive) isn't destructive.
    Regarding food excitement, mine didn't always come from the idea of eating something, but instead happened when I realized how good it was or how much my family was enjoying it. It was exciting to learn how to cook new things (or new ways to cook old favorites), exploring new flavor profiles, and so on. I'm also a sucker for trolling through recipes to figure out how to create some of the flavors we've enjoyed in a way that I'm able to feel good about eating them (like bulgogi and daikon noodles, instead of the traditional bulgogi jap chae). Stuff like that definitely excites me, even now that I know I can enjoy it occasionally at my favorite restaurant... because it's even better if I can enjoy it more often at home  
    This right here was one of my favorite things about my first round. I had NO IDEA how awesome sweet potatoes, butternut squash, and even carrots could be with nothing but oil and a few spices... no sugar needed!
  7. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Emma in Whole 30 (July 2)   
    I agree with this 100%, especially when cooking for more than just yourself.
    -----
    Here's how mine works:
    Kroger is typically on the weekend. I order online and schedule pick-up for sometime Friday through Sunday.
    Sprouts (if I'm going) depends on the sales. Wednesday is the best day overall, because their ads start and end on Wednesday (so it overlaps and you get the best price between the two weeks' sales on that one day). They also have $5 sushi on Wednesdays, which makes my husband happy. If there's a great weekend-only sale, it might warrant a weekend trip, too.
    (Aldi and LIDL I don't "write in" on my shopping plan. If I'm going, I'll go based solely on the ad and my overall schedule.)
    My mom stops by a local produce market most days during the week (M-F) also, to see what's in the bargain bin... which means random stuff is making its way home throughout the week.

    Working from that schedule, I make my meal plan run from Sunday to Saturday. I write in the full week's plan for meats and starchy veggies, and through about Tuesday for other produce. Most of that will be purchased at Kroger. Produce for Wednesday-forward is based on Sprouts' sales (or what I get from Aldi or LIDL), or left blank so I can use whatever comes home from the market.
  8. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Emma in Whole 30 (July 2)   
    I agree with this 100%, especially when cooking for more than just yourself.
    -----
    Here's how mine works:
    Kroger is typically on the weekend. I order online and schedule pick-up for sometime Friday through Sunday.
    Sprouts (if I'm going) depends on the sales. Wednesday is the best day overall, because their ads start and end on Wednesday (so it overlaps and you get the best price between the two weeks' sales on that one day). They also have $5 sushi on Wednesdays, which makes my husband happy. If there's a great weekend-only sale, it might warrant a weekend trip, too.
    (Aldi and LIDL I don't "write in" on my shopping plan. If I'm going, I'll go based solely on the ad and my overall schedule.)
    My mom stops by a local produce market most days during the week (M-F) also, to see what's in the bargain bin... which means random stuff is making its way home throughout the week.

    Working from that schedule, I make my meal plan run from Sunday to Saturday. I write in the full week's plan for meats and starchy veggies, and through about Tuesday for other produce. Most of that will be purchased at Kroger. Produce for Wednesday-forward is based on Sprouts' sales (or what I get from Aldi or LIDL), or left blank so I can use whatever comes home from the market.
  9. Like
    Jihanna reacted to SchrodingersCat in SchrodingersCat's Round 2 diary - starting 12 May 2019   
    That's actually exactly what I'm going to do! a 2 week mini-reset. 
    I'm just all or nothing. I'm either perfectly happy on round, or eating a pack of cookies for dinner. Plus eating crappy makes me feel crappy and feeling crappy makes me eat crappy. Ironic. 
    I've had my yearly "event" - we throw a 4th of July party every year where we host 40+ people and serve every stereotypical USA food under the sun (I'm an American living in Australia) and it involves interstate guests and leftovers and just insane foods. 
    But tomorrow is food-prep and I'm back on track. I've gained 7lbs!!
     
  10. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from coachmandiep in Started 1st day today!   
    Holy guacamole! I honestly can't imagine spending that much on a week of groceries... for my 7-person household (4-5 adult-sized mouths at any given time), a typical week comes in around $150, not including non-food items. I cook one family meal each day (5-6 days per week), and anyone who doesn't want that can grab something different (two of my kids usually eat little - or nothing - of what I cook). I keep a variety of foods on hand for everyone to have their own breakfasts, lunches, and snacks.
    The important part here is that I don't follow someone else's meal plan -- I write my own. I check online ads for stores I'm willing to shop, and make a list of what I'm most likely to want (or what the family would enjoy) with pricing. Based on what's actually on sale, I'll work up a custom meal plan each week, pulling from recipes I've used before or "new" stuff I want to try out. Then, I use the meal plan and recipe reference to make my shopping list, separated by store so I can get the best possible value for our money.
    I make my own mayo as well as most of my own dressings, dips, sauces, etc. I'll use store-bought condiments that are inexpensive, but I don't bother with the pricey ones no matter how good everyone says they taste. If I can't find it cheap or make it myself, I'll do without.
    Kroger's where most of my shopping is done, using ClickList -- I order online and pay $5 to have an employee go collect everything and bring it out to my car, allowing me to avoid walking the store and potentially spending more money than I should on stuff we really don't need. We use digital coupons and paper ones, nearly always reducing the overall bill by more than the service fee, and I get FuelPoints. It works for us.
    Sprouts is my favorite for produce in general, and they often have great deals on fresh meat, too. I get my coco-aminos and daikon radish there, as well as a few other things that I can't find at my other local stores.
    Aldi and LIDL are my backups. I don't go to either one often, but will go if they've got enough on sale to warrant a visit. Aldi is close enough to my house that it doesn't take a lot to warrant the trip, especially when they drop the price on the 3-pack multi-colored bell peppers.
    I also really like our local butcher, which has some pretty good sales at times. Unfortunately, I don't often have the funds available to run there since the better prices are on the larger packages of meat.
    Ground beef is the majority of our protein, but I'm always on the lookout for good deals on chicken. Roasts have to be on a really good sale for me to bother with them, because I'm generally cooking on the 8-portion level for the sake of having at least a little left over.
    ...I'm noticing how long this post is, despite attempts to shorten it, so I'm going to stop now...  
  11. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Kris22 in Starting July 8th and Preparing for All the Suck   
    I just thought I'd pop in to give a few thoughts on stress relief and being excited over food...
    When I'm stressed, one of the first things I usually reach for is aromatherapy (essential oils), sometimes paired with a shower or bath. Music also helps me -- I've got a handful of YouTube playlists set up (different types of music for different moods), and iHeartRadio is something I've started using recently since I can play my favorite radio station or listen to stations based on a few specific artists I enjoy. Relaxing in a pool is one of my absolute favorite ways to unwind, though I don't get to do it often (a bath is about as close as I get except a few times per year, I'm afraid).
    If I absolutely want to kill all the things and nothing else is helping, I go kill all the things... really! I enjoy playing video games sometimes, and I've got a few that are fun to just go in and kill stuff when the urge strikes. I don't spend hours and hours at them, but it definitely helps sometimes to just go spend an hour (if that) going absolutely nuts in a way that (while not productive) isn't destructive.
    Regarding food excitement, mine didn't always come from the idea of eating something, but instead happened when I realized how good it was or how much my family was enjoying it. It was exciting to learn how to cook new things (or new ways to cook old favorites), exploring new flavor profiles, and so on. I'm also a sucker for trolling through recipes to figure out how to create some of the flavors we've enjoyed in a way that I'm able to feel good about eating them (like bulgogi and daikon noodles, instead of the traditional bulgogi jap chae). Stuff like that definitely excites me, even now that I know I can enjoy it occasionally at my favorite restaurant... because it's even better if I can enjoy it more often at home  
    This right here was one of my favorite things about my first round. I had NO IDEA how awesome sweet potatoes, butternut squash, and even carrots could be with nothing but oil and a few spices... no sugar needed!
  12. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Kris22 in Starting July 8th and Preparing for All the Suck   
    I just thought I'd pop in to give a few thoughts on stress relief and being excited over food...
    When I'm stressed, one of the first things I usually reach for is aromatherapy (essential oils), sometimes paired with a shower or bath. Music also helps me -- I've got a handful of YouTube playlists set up (different types of music for different moods), and iHeartRadio is something I've started using recently since I can play my favorite radio station or listen to stations based on a few specific artists I enjoy. Relaxing in a pool is one of my absolute favorite ways to unwind, though I don't get to do it often (a bath is about as close as I get except a few times per year, I'm afraid).
    If I absolutely want to kill all the things and nothing else is helping, I go kill all the things... really! I enjoy playing video games sometimes, and I've got a few that are fun to just go in and kill stuff when the urge strikes. I don't spend hours and hours at them, but it definitely helps sometimes to just go spend an hour (if that) going absolutely nuts in a way that (while not productive) isn't destructive.
    Regarding food excitement, mine didn't always come from the idea of eating something, but instead happened when I realized how good it was or how much my family was enjoying it. It was exciting to learn how to cook new things (or new ways to cook old favorites), exploring new flavor profiles, and so on. I'm also a sucker for trolling through recipes to figure out how to create some of the flavors we've enjoyed in a way that I'm able to feel good about eating them (like bulgogi and daikon noodles, instead of the traditional bulgogi jap chae). Stuff like that definitely excites me, even now that I know I can enjoy it occasionally at my favorite restaurant... because it's even better if I can enjoy it more often at home  
    This right here was one of my favorite things about my first round. I had NO IDEA how awesome sweet potatoes, butternut squash, and even carrots could be with nothing but oil and a few spices... no sugar needed!
  13. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from coachmandiep in Started 1st day today!   
    Holy guacamole! I honestly can't imagine spending that much on a week of groceries... for my 7-person household (4-5 adult-sized mouths at any given time), a typical week comes in around $150, not including non-food items. I cook one family meal each day (5-6 days per week), and anyone who doesn't want that can grab something different (two of my kids usually eat little - or nothing - of what I cook). I keep a variety of foods on hand for everyone to have their own breakfasts, lunches, and snacks.
    The important part here is that I don't follow someone else's meal plan -- I write my own. I check online ads for stores I'm willing to shop, and make a list of what I'm most likely to want (or what the family would enjoy) with pricing. Based on what's actually on sale, I'll work up a custom meal plan each week, pulling from recipes I've used before or "new" stuff I want to try out. Then, I use the meal plan and recipe reference to make my shopping list, separated by store so I can get the best possible value for our money.
    I make my own mayo as well as most of my own dressings, dips, sauces, etc. I'll use store-bought condiments that are inexpensive, but I don't bother with the pricey ones no matter how good everyone says they taste. If I can't find it cheap or make it myself, I'll do without.
    Kroger's where most of my shopping is done, using ClickList -- I order online and pay $5 to have an employee go collect everything and bring it out to my car, allowing me to avoid walking the store and potentially spending more money than I should on stuff we really don't need. We use digital coupons and paper ones, nearly always reducing the overall bill by more than the service fee, and I get FuelPoints. It works for us.
    Sprouts is my favorite for produce in general, and they often have great deals on fresh meat, too. I get my coco-aminos and daikon radish there, as well as a few other things that I can't find at my other local stores.
    Aldi and LIDL are my backups. I don't go to either one often, but will go if they've got enough on sale to warrant a visit. Aldi is close enough to my house that it doesn't take a lot to warrant the trip, especially when they drop the price on the 3-pack multi-colored bell peppers.
    I also really like our local butcher, which has some pretty good sales at times. Unfortunately, I don't often have the funds available to run there since the better prices are on the larger packages of meat.
    Ground beef is the majority of our protein, but I'm always on the lookout for good deals on chicken. Roasts have to be on a really good sale for me to bother with them, because I'm generally cooking on the 8-portion level for the sake of having at least a little left over.
    ...I'm noticing how long this post is, despite attempts to shorten it, so I'm going to stop now...  
  14. Like
    Jihanna reacted to Kris22 in Starting July 8th and Preparing for All the Suck   
    Day 4 NSV- I had a sweet potato as part of my lunch today and the sweet and delicious flavors that I tasted in it- I think my tastebuds are becoming more sensitive to the sweetness and flavor in unprocessed and natural foods.  Yum! 
  15. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from coachmandiep in Stomach pains   
    A few things stick out to me, when looking at what you ate...
    1 - like @ebutz27 said, you do have a fair amount of nightshades included in your meals there, so a sensitivity to those could definitely be causing problems, especially if you're eating more of them now than you did prior to starting your round.
    2 - again, as she noted, since you ate the same thing for lunch both days it's possible that there's an ingredient in that (or a combo of them) that isn't agreeing with your system. My mom can't handle Cumin, for example, it causes massive distress to her system... which means I make all of my chili powder and other spice blends from scratch, so I can skip the cumin entirely for everything she'll eat. I also skip Rosemary (my husband doesn't like it) and drastically reduce Oregano (I was allergic as a kid and we're still testing how much I can manage).
    3 - apples, maybe? If you weren't eating as much apple previously and now are, it might be that you're experiencing bloating because the apples are fermented in your gut. I have to be careful of how much apple I eat, for that reason.
    Of course, it might not be strictly food-related, but that's definitely one of the easiest things to look at first  I hope you're able to figure it out, and would definitely suggest maybe taking a nightshade-free day (or two) where apples are also out of the picture, just to see if you avoid those pains and can maybe start narrowing down whether or not it is a food sensitivity causing the problem.
  16. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from coachmandiep in Started 1st day today!   
    Holy guacamole! I honestly can't imagine spending that much on a week of groceries... for my 7-person household (4-5 adult-sized mouths at any given time), a typical week comes in around $150, not including non-food items. I cook one family meal each day (5-6 days per week), and anyone who doesn't want that can grab something different (two of my kids usually eat little - or nothing - of what I cook). I keep a variety of foods on hand for everyone to have their own breakfasts, lunches, and snacks.
    The important part here is that I don't follow someone else's meal plan -- I write my own. I check online ads for stores I'm willing to shop, and make a list of what I'm most likely to want (or what the family would enjoy) with pricing. Based on what's actually on sale, I'll work up a custom meal plan each week, pulling from recipes I've used before or "new" stuff I want to try out. Then, I use the meal plan and recipe reference to make my shopping list, separated by store so I can get the best possible value for our money.
    I make my own mayo as well as most of my own dressings, dips, sauces, etc. I'll use store-bought condiments that are inexpensive, but I don't bother with the pricey ones no matter how good everyone says they taste. If I can't find it cheap or make it myself, I'll do without.
    Kroger's where most of my shopping is done, using ClickList -- I order online and pay $5 to have an employee go collect everything and bring it out to my car, allowing me to avoid walking the store and potentially spending more money than I should on stuff we really don't need. We use digital coupons and paper ones, nearly always reducing the overall bill by more than the service fee, and I get FuelPoints. It works for us.
    Sprouts is my favorite for produce in general, and they often have great deals on fresh meat, too. I get my coco-aminos and daikon radish there, as well as a few other things that I can't find at my other local stores.
    Aldi and LIDL are my backups. I don't go to either one often, but will go if they've got enough on sale to warrant a visit. Aldi is close enough to my house that it doesn't take a lot to warrant the trip, especially when they drop the price on the 3-pack multi-colored bell peppers.
    I also really like our local butcher, which has some pretty good sales at times. Unfortunately, I don't often have the funds available to run there since the better prices are on the larger packages of meat.
    Ground beef is the majority of our protein, but I'm always on the lookout for good deals on chicken. Roasts have to be on a really good sale for me to bother with them, because I'm generally cooking on the 8-portion level for the sake of having at least a little left over.
    ...I'm noticing how long this post is, despite attempts to shorten it, so I'm going to stop now...  
  17. Like
    Jihanna reacted to kirbz in Whole 30 (July 2)   
    Ooh, good discussion! Honestly, I also don't think there are good foods and bad foods. There's simply food. 
    If you've taken the time to learn, you know how different foods affect you. That's the point of Whole30 in my mind. It's learning how food fuels you. From there, it's simply a choice. Knowing how this will make me feel, do I want it or don't I? Even if it makes you feel terrible, it's not a "bad" food because you choose to eat it in a moment that's worth it. 
    But yeah, society applies all sorts of silly judgement and labels and emotions to food. Yes, McDonald's is probably completely devoid of nutritional value but it's delicious and I decided it was worth it and so I ate some. So what? It's simply food and knowledge and choices! 
    I feel like I've read a really good article (or something in one of the books) about this but I can't recall where...
  18. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from coachmandiep in Whole 30 (July 2)   
    I think you've got it, Emma! Even McDonald's food isn't "good" or "bad", it's just options that you can choose to use or pass by... and some of the options might be better or worse for your personal situation, but you're still an adult who will make those decisions based on knowledge gained during this whole process and beyond. Food Freedom is about being able to make those choices. Sometimes my Freedom choice is going for an unhealthy (or less healthy) option because the situation makes it a "worth it" moment, but being able to find that balance and make the choices without judging myself harshly afterward was part of my goal -- another part is making sure "worth it" moments don't happen all the time, since that sort of defeats the purpose. (I want to quickly remind that "worth it" happens after reintroduction, because you have to get to baseline and determine your reactions before you can effectively judge whether or not something is worth you eating it! That can get confusing when talking about it in a during-W30 topic, so I didn't want to make anyone think I'm condoning going off-plan!).
  19. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from coachmandiep in Whole 30 (July 2)   
    I think you've got it, Emma! Even McDonald's food isn't "good" or "bad", it's just options that you can choose to use or pass by... and some of the options might be better or worse for your personal situation, but you're still an adult who will make those decisions based on knowledge gained during this whole process and beyond. Food Freedom is about being able to make those choices. Sometimes my Freedom choice is going for an unhealthy (or less healthy) option because the situation makes it a "worth it" moment, but being able to find that balance and make the choices without judging myself harshly afterward was part of my goal -- another part is making sure "worth it" moments don't happen all the time, since that sort of defeats the purpose. (I want to quickly remind that "worth it" happens after reintroduction, because you have to get to baseline and determine your reactions before you can effectively judge whether or not something is worth you eating it! That can get confusing when talking about it in a during-W30 topic, so I didn't want to make anyone think I'm condoning going off-plan!).
  20. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from coachmandiep in Whole 30 (July 2)   
    I think you've got it, Emma! Even McDonald's food isn't "good" or "bad", it's just options that you can choose to use or pass by... and some of the options might be better or worse for your personal situation, but you're still an adult who will make those decisions based on knowledge gained during this whole process and beyond. Food Freedom is about being able to make those choices. Sometimes my Freedom choice is going for an unhealthy (or less healthy) option because the situation makes it a "worth it" moment, but being able to find that balance and make the choices without judging myself harshly afterward was part of my goal -- another part is making sure "worth it" moments don't happen all the time, since that sort of defeats the purpose. (I want to quickly remind that "worth it" happens after reintroduction, because you have to get to baseline and determine your reactions before you can effectively judge whether or not something is worth you eating it! That can get confusing when talking about it in a during-W30 topic, so I didn't want to make anyone think I'm condoning going off-plan!).
  21. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from coachmandiep in Whole 30 (July 2)   
    I think you've got it, Emma! Even McDonald's food isn't "good" or "bad", it's just options that you can choose to use or pass by... and some of the options might be better or worse for your personal situation, but you're still an adult who will make those decisions based on knowledge gained during this whole process and beyond. Food Freedom is about being able to make those choices. Sometimes my Freedom choice is going for an unhealthy (or less healthy) option because the situation makes it a "worth it" moment, but being able to find that balance and make the choices without judging myself harshly afterward was part of my goal -- another part is making sure "worth it" moments don't happen all the time, since that sort of defeats the purpose. (I want to quickly remind that "worth it" happens after reintroduction, because you have to get to baseline and determine your reactions before you can effectively judge whether or not something is worth you eating it! That can get confusing when talking about it in a during-W30 topic, so I didn't want to make anyone think I'm condoning going off-plan!).
  22. Like
    Jihanna reacted to Laura of The Great White North in Starting July 8th and Preparing for All the Suck   
    One of the big reasons I am taking on this journey is to change my relationship with food. It has been my drug for my entire life. I was also reflecting on my tendency to self sabotage when I try to make a change in my lifestyle. I discovered that there's a part of me that feels unworthy of being healthy because I'm fat. Somehow I've allowed myself to believe that I'm doomed to remain unhealthy because of the unhealthy choices I've made thus far. But I see now that I am the most worthy of love and self care and healthy habits. You are too!! And the fact that you recognize that you were eating out of habit/craving last night rather than hunger is a HUGE non scale victory that you should celebrate. Plus you didn't eat sugar, you found a healthier option. Next time you'll be able to recognize your motivation for eating and you can make a different choice-or not if you're truly hungry. You're doing great!!
  23. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Emma in Started June 26-- Day 14!   
    I'm not sure how Mandie would explain it, but for me it's a matter of looking at foods as options -- they're not "good" or "bad", they're all just options that I can consider. Likewise, I'm not "being bad" or "being good" based on what I choose to eat. I make food decisions, using what I'd learned in reintroduction (and since then) to help me understand what consequences could occur.
    Dairy isn't "bad" just because it happens to cause indigestion and eczema in my body. Meat isn't "bad" just because a vegetarian chooses not to eat it. Asparagus isn't "good" just because it's healthy and I like it, and it's not "bad" just because it causes unbearable bloating and gas for my mom. Legumes aren't "bad" just because they're not allowed for Whole30, but they aren't "good" either.
    Throwing out the labels allows me to really look at the reasons behind my choices. I'm able to really consider the why of it, which allows me to better understand whether or not something can be part of my food freedom. Sometimes that means I'm looking forward at consequences and making that decision before eating a thing... sometimes I'm looking back and realizing I really could've done without it, avoiding physical discomfort that really made it "not worth it for me". Sometimes I realize that a food choice inadvertently was on on-ramp to "off the rails", so I rein it in (mini-reset) and take that into account the next time I'm deciding whether or not to eat that food.
    If I do choose to eat something I know will bring consequences, I don't justify my decisions or bargain with myself to make them (i.e., "it's only a little" or "I'll exercise more"). I just make the decision, and allow myself to enjoy the food I chose (hint: if it wasn't enjoyable, it wasn't worth it and next time I'll skip it even if I didn't experience any bad reaction).
    It's all about food freedom, and it really was freeing to not only stop seeing foods as my enemies but also to stop the cycle of calling myself names because of my food choices (or head-first dives into just-eat-everything, which happen far less often now).
  24. Like
    Jihanna reacted to Mariina in Started June 26-- Day 14!   
    Wow, thank you so much Jihanna!  Your response could not have been more helpful.  I'm sure I will continuously go back and read this throughout and after my whole30.  It's about being self reflective, truthful with yourself, and understanding why we are making certain choices and whether or not it was one worth making again or not because of whatever consequences.
  25. Like
    Jihanna reacted to coachmandiep in Started June 26-- Day 14!   
    Yes, yes, yes!  Well said Jihanna!  I echo everything you said here.  This is exactly what Food Freedom is about.  No judgements, no punishments, no guilt; only decisions based on what you have learned (from your reintroduction and continued experience).  It is a journey that is never-ending, as we are constantly learning and adding to our list of worth-it and not-worth-it foods.  Even this can change when considering the situation.  The ability to learn and move on using your new-found knowledge is Food Freedom!