Jihanna

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  1. Thanks
    Jihanna reacted to SchrodingersCat in Amazon   
    @kirbz and @CNW
    I can explain the salami thing (as a salami maker!) - Salami is a fermented meat. It isn't cooked, it is aged and fermented. If it isn't fermented properly, it just rots and (at best) goes off, while at worst it can create very toxic bacteria. The key ingredient to kick starting a ferment? SUGAR! There's simply no other way to kick off a ferment.
    In fermented products like sauerkraut and fermented veg, there is enough naturally occurring sugar to kick off the ferment, but meat has 0 naturally occurring sugar, so it must be added. 
    So while there are chomp sticks and some rare products which claim to be salami and don't have sugar, they're actually more of a jerky product (dehydrated and preserved with salt) than a salami. I have wracked my brain on how to make compliant salami and have come up absolutely blank. It just can't be done, and still be a salami.
     
  2. Like
    Jihanna reacted to Brewer5 in Like an Onion   
    Thanks @BabyBear ~ I appreciate your support.  
    This journey back to food that is not causing a chemical shit-show in my brain and my entire body ... it is very, very much like quitting smoking.  We've had discussions on the forum about this in the past.  I don't think the majority of people are aware of how much food really does interact with every part of our being.
    I can go one day, EASY.  And I feel better -- good!  Productive!  Two days ... probably even easier.  Things start to become habit again.  
    It's day 3 that is the hardest for smokers.  They say it's because after 72 hours, all of the nicotine is gone from your body.  But we all know there's more to it than that.
    It's those layers of myself and how I got to this point that I need to peel back here.  And it can be downright painful.  
    We self-medicate with food, smoking, alcohol, drugs, shopping, gambling ... and our brain is literally wired to expect those big hits of dopamine.  Not only do we have withdrawal symptoms from the absence of whatever we have removed ~ but we have to FACE those things we were self-medicating for in the first place.  Whew.  Ugly.
    The great news is -- I am a strong and confident person.  I have grown and learned so much.  I love myself for who I am.  And I really don't engage in the "beat myself up" behavior.  So what you are saying resonates with me.  
    If I have 50 "Day 1's" throughout this year ... that's still 50 days of good eating that I wouldn't have had otherwise.  Lol.  That's not my goal ... but it IS a tiny win.  
  3. Like
    Jihanna reacted to Brewer5 in Like an Onion   
    I can't believe how many new products have come out since I did my first Whole 30 ... 5 years ago?  Five years doesn't sound like a long time, but things have come A LONG way.
    Those days of trying to make my own mayonnaise in the beginning gave me PTSD, I'm afraid.  I can't even look at my blender without thinking of it.    But last night I checked out the Sir Kensington avocado oil mayonnaise my husband has in the fridge, and what do I see?  NO SUGAR.  Are you kidding me?  I haven't looked around the forums lately, but if anyone out there is saying it is too much work -- I would be giving the whole, "We walked barefoot in the snow to school, five miles each way, and it was ALL uphill" speech.  ...It's probably best if I stay here and don't look.  Lol.
    When Dallas and Melissa wrote the book back then, they said this isn't hard.  I didn't think it was "hard" -- but it was a lot of thinking and a lot of extra work.  Now?  Yeah.  So totally not hard.  
    Jicama already cut into sticks?  Sweet potatoes already diced and ready to cook?  Wait -- ZOODLES, too?!  I bought a frickin Zoodler!  
    So, yeah.  You can tell I haven't spent much time at the grocery store lately.  I hate the grocery store.  But I actually enjoyed the trip last night.
    ---
    Came home and had a nice big romaine salad with chicken breast (cooked in the air fryer ~ we are loving that thing!), salsa, Tessemae's cilantro lime dressing, and a whole lotta baked potato with ghee and coconut oil.
    Did I want to eat the cheesecake in the fridge at one point?  Of course I wanted to.  But I'd rather feel good, and that was my very next thought.
    "Cravings are a suggestion, not a command."  <-- That is the biggest thing that has stuck with me from my time spent on a quit smoking forum.  It is so simple, but holds so much meaning.
  4. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from DarrellWolfe in What do you drink?   
    Soda addiction is something I battled off and on since I was 15 years old, and now 24 years later I've finally kicked the habit. It's one of my biggest NSVs, and doing Whole30 would've been totally worth it (for me) if that was my only gain.
    Prior to Whole30, I draink 1-2 liters of "fully-leaded" Coca-Cola every day. I even polished off the last of my "one last bottle" the evening before my Day 1.
    Week 1 sucked, especially Days 2-4. It was horrifying. I was fighting dehydration, withdrawal, and lovely lady-type issues all at once. "Hangover" doesn't do it justice, it was detox (which is way worse than just being hung over). I slept a lot, there were points where I couldn't move without just breaking down in tears... and I was so glad that I'd prepped a little bit so I could eat and tell the family to DIY. I needed nausea meds to keep food down long enough to let me fall asleep on Day 2. The headache lasted for days, but I still had to get out and do things like buy groceries for the new week's meal plan, put them away, and even cook for my family. Day 5 I finally managed the whole day without meds for pain or nausea.
    During that first week, I did actually sweeten things with fruit/juice more than I probably should've. I was drinking black coffee, but also having hot tea during the day (2 cups water and 2 bags tea: 1 black, 1 "fruity" but compliant from a sampler box) which I sweetened with juice squeezed out of Cuties (1 baby orange per mug of tea). I also started keeping ice in my "main" cup so I could grab ice to suck on any time I felt like I would've normally grabbed a mint (I went through a large bag from Kroger every 1-2 weeks before W30). I'm another one who doesn't like regular unflavored water, but I get a good bit of it through my ice due to the amount I go through (and I drink water as the ice melts because it tastes better to me when it's still super-cold).
    Reading here, I had seen quite a few ways to get my soda fix without stepping out of compliance. But I'm a recovering alcoholic, so I am all too aware of what it means if I need a "fix"... it means I'm addicted, which means anything remotely like that thing I craved would only serve to support that addiction rather than help me break free of it. Even adding a splash of fruit juice (especially lemon/lime) to some sparkling water would've been totally SWYPO for me, because I could drink Sprite in place of Coke and be happy as long as I didn't feel the need for the caffeine at the time.
    The day after my Whole30, I drank some Coke. It's not recommended, it definitely wasn't a reintro of only one food group, but I needed to know if it was going to cause those cravings again... because if it did, I wanted to do another 30 days to continue working on getting free of that addiction.
    I'll be honest -- it didn't even taste good. It was syrupy, the carbonation didn't give me the "ahh" feeling I expected, and it tasted more like chemicals than sweetness. I sipped on it very sparingly while we were out (because I didn't want to pay for ice and had forgotten my ice cup at home), then gave the rest to my husband as soon as we walked back in our front door. He hasn't been doing Whole30 with me, and took it gladly... but I just reveled in the fact that even carbonation has no hold on me, anymore!
    Breaking my soda addiction probably wouldn't have happened if I hadn't done Whole30 the way it was intended, complete with sucking it up and making sure I didn't give myself any room for adventures in SWYPO. I feel so much happier knowing that I can continue my (slow and drawn-out) reintroduction without worrying that I'm going to slide right back into my old habits and addictions afterward, because if I can break away from SODA, I'm totally confident that I can break away from anything.
    (On a related note, on that first reintro day I also added some honey to my hot tea, and didn't even notice enough change in flavor for me to bother adding any sweetener to it since then.)
    Putting down the things we're used to is hard, and not recreating them during Whole30 might actually be harder... but finding freedom from the things that are doing more harm than good (in our bodies and minds) is really what this whole process is all about.
  5. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from BabyBear in KiwiKendra's Log from New Zealand   
    A good way to use up ranch is twice-baked ranch potatoes... just sayin'  they're delicious!
    This recipe went over really well with my family during my first Whole30 --
    https://thewholecook.com/broccoli-ranch-twice-baked-potatoes/
    (Of course, I was told that just the ranch and bacon would've been fine, the broccoli was non-essential for everyone except me!)
  6. Like
    Jihanna reacted to ShannonM816 in What A Serving of Eggs Looks Like   
    If your meals are keeping you satisfied 4-5 hours at a time, you're good.
    Often, we see people who come from a background of calorie restriction who continue to limit their meal sizes the way they would if they were counting calories, sometimes purposefully, sometimes subconsciously. Mostly, this was a post to encourage those people to eat as much as they need to eat, even if it seems like a lot of food, and to say that it is okay to eat more than what they may be used to, if that's what it takes to stay satisfied and avoid snacking between meals.
  7. Like
    Jihanna reacted to Angelia in My Journey from a Day 31 perspective   
    Agreed!  That is my plan after other reintro's.  I'm not in a big hurry to get back to peanuts or soy, so I'm in no rush but I do want to know which is the guilty party.
  8. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from KiwiKendra in KiwiKendra's Log from New Zealand   
    A good way to use up ranch is twice-baked ranch potatoes... just sayin'  they're delicious!
    This recipe went over really well with my family during my first Whole30 --
    https://thewholecook.com/broccoli-ranch-twice-baked-potatoes/
    (Of course, I was told that just the ranch and bacon would've been fine, the broccoli was non-essential for everyone except me!)
  9. Like
    Jihanna reacted to kirbz in Kirbz's Whole30 Log   
    ROUND 3, Day 8: Monday, September 9
    Meal 1: three scrambled eggs with a splash of coconut milk; bowl of cauliflower bone broth soup; two slices of bacon
    Pre-Workout Snack: hard-boiled egg; banana
    Exercise (6 hours, 20 minutes): 5.88-mile, 10-pitch rock climb with 2,395 of elevation gain and topping out at 10,306 feet (137 average HR; 174 max HR)  
    Intra-Workout Snack: pouch of peach, apricot, and banana baby food; pouch of blueberry, pear, and purple carrot baby food; half mango RXBar
    Intra-Workout Meal 2: collard green sandwich wrap with four slices deli turkey, one and a half slices of bacon, half avocado, onion, sprouts and mayo; banana
    Post-Workout Snack: hard-boiled egg; pouch of sweet potato and beet baby food; can of coconut water
    Meal 3: one and a half chicken enchilada stuffed bell peppers; can of sliced potatoes pan fried in ghee
    Water Intake: ~100 oz
    Symptoms/NSVs:
    Improved physical performance Jeans and climbing harness fitting more loosely Regular bowel movements (this is a big deal because I’m pretty regularly constipated on Whole30) Thoughts/Reflections: I did it! My first double-digit multi-pitch climb!
    I don’t know if my hard work is finally paying off, if I’m turning the corner toward Tiger Blood, or if I just fueled right, but I felt great today! Honestly, it was probably a combination of all of those things and I’m so, so happy to finally see changes happening in the mountains.  
    It was hard. Most definitely, it was hard. And my legs were oh-so tired. But I never doubted that I could do it! And that is a huge improvement over my last multi-pitch climb!
    I do like the fueling strategy I used, which was basically lots of fruity carbs (thank you new Whole30 workout guidelines!). Though I think I could have used one more carb break before the summit. The final push to the summit felt like bonking more than general fatigue, and that’s likely due to the fact that I hadn’t had a carb hit in quite some time before those last few pitches. For a while, it just didn’t feel that far away so I kept holding out. And then I had an RXBar rather than fruit, which I think was a mistake. So, here’s to lots of fruity carbs for fuel!
    [Photo 1: the lake where we started, with Tenaya Peak in the background]
    [Photo 2: from the top of Tenaya Peak] 


  10. Thanks
    Jihanna got a reaction from KiwiKendra in KiwiKendra's Log from New Zealand   
    When I was doing my first round, I bookmarked my log so I could jump straight to it without getting distracted by the rest of the forum. Then, after posting, I'd go wander and look at other peoples' posts  
    Regarding quoting -- if someone's post is long and you're wanting to quote/respond to a small part of it, you can highlight that bit and then choose the quote option  This helps when you have long-winded comments, like the ones I sometimes give  You can choose to put a response/quote in your own log post, or you can respond in one and do a separate post just for your actual log (which might help you keep it straight when scrolling through to find your posts), but if you come to this thread to respond and post your new entries then it'll all stay in the same thread.
    I hope that helped without making it more confusing!
  11. Like
    Jihanna reacted to ShannonM816 in KiwiKendra's Log from New Zealand   
    Remember that all your meals don't have to be fancy. Some really simple meals that I do that don't take a lot of prep:  scrambled eggs with spinach/other vegetables; a can of tuna or salmon mixed with mayo or avocado or even just olive oil, on top of salad; hamburger patty (I buy frozen, pre-formed ones and cook them straight from the freezer, but you could buy ground meat of whatever type you prefer and freeze it in patties) with mayo and mustard or avocado, tomato, onion, and pickles, with a side of roasted potato or sweet potato.  Or I grill a bunch of chicken at the start of the week, then I can use it in salads or stir fries for several meals. You don't have to have a brand new recipe at every meal. Just make sure you have food that is easy to prepare quickly on days when you don't have time to do anything elaborate. 
  12. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from KiwiKendra in KiwiKendra's Log from New Zealand   
    Nope, it's not... you're right! I actually hate the store stuff with a passion, never have liked it and would purposefully avoid it when possible. I didn't like my first few batches of homemade mayo either, but they were fine for mixing in with herbs and stuff for dressings. How I make it now is great for me, though; I can finally stand the taste of it  
  13. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Emma in KiwiKendra's Log from New Zealand   
    It's only failure if you don't learn something from the experience. If you do learn, it's a stepping stone.
    I'd definitely encourage you to kind of slowly ramp yourself into your start date, so that you can prepare some condiments ahead of time and get a feel for how they taste, tweaks you might want to make, and how often you use them. If you also go ahead and remove a couple of the food groups W30 eliminates, you might be able to limit your detox issues (since you won't be coming off all of them all at once).
    Either way, it's awesome that you're not just walking away!
    That said, I absolutely despise the taste of mayo made with olive oil, even the super-light stuff. I tried grapeseed oil once, and then tried once where I did half grapeseed and half light olive... both disgusting. SUNFLOWER OIL is my saving grace, because it's way cheaper than avocado (which is what's suggested in so many blogs) and it has an amazingly light flavor that lets the seasonings do all the talking. My recipe includes the oil, egg, and lemon juice, plus salt, mustard powder, garlic powder, and a sprinkle of pepper. I'm happy to share it, if you'd like
  14. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Jack william in Suggestions for Coffee Substitute?   
    I'd second the Crio Bru type drinks. I bought myself a sampler pack for Mother's Day, and I've been really enjoying them. I usually add some into my morning coffee so I get a chocolate-y undertone to the coffee itself, but I've also tried a couple of them brewed alone... mixed with just a bit of almond milk, it's quite a nice departure from my usual morning drinks. I sometimes add a dash of cinnamon with mine, also.
  15. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from LindsayO in Suggestions for Coffee Substitute?   
    I'd second the Crio Bru type drinks. I bought myself a sampler pack for Mother's Day, and I've been really enjoying them. I usually add some into my morning coffee so I get a chocolate-y undertone to the coffee itself, but I've also tried a couple of them brewed alone... mixed with just a bit of almond milk, it's quite a nice departure from my usual morning drinks. I sometimes add a dash of cinnamon with mine, also.
  16. Like
    Jihanna reacted to ShannonM816 in Suggestions for Coffee Substitute?   
    Have you tried the cacao based beverages like choffy or crio bru? I don't have them real often, but they're a nice change. Don't expect it to taste like hot chocolate, it's not sweetened, it's just brewed cocoa beans, but it's not bad. 
    There was a discussion here on the forum recently about the mushroom based drinks, I don't remember if anyone ever went back and posted an actual review of them or if it was just people asking if anyone had tried them.
    You might also consider quitting all caffeine at some point and seeing how that affects things. It can be pretty miserable at first, but after a couple of weeks you may be surprised to find that you don't need the morning jolt of coffee anymore.
  17. Like
    Jihanna reacted to Pandora Black in What do you drink?   
    Flavored sparkling water (La Croix, Bubbly) is my saving grace. I don’t like it as much as I liked soda, but it’s fine for now. It got me off the soda at least. I also love turmeric tea with lemon.
    I had the same experience as Jihanna, detox was awful. I had a headache, my cravings were off the charts and I was exhausted. I slept a lot. But it passed and now I’m feeling lots better. I don’t even crave soda anymore.
  18. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Pandora Black in What do you drink?   
    Soda addiction is something I battled off and on since I was 15 years old, and now 24 years later I've finally kicked the habit. It's one of my biggest NSVs, and doing Whole30 would've been totally worth it (for me) if that was my only gain.
    Prior to Whole30, I draink 1-2 liters of "fully-leaded" Coca-Cola every day. I even polished off the last of my "one last bottle" the evening before my Day 1.
    Week 1 sucked, especially Days 2-4. It was horrifying. I was fighting dehydration, withdrawal, and lovely lady-type issues all at once. "Hangover" doesn't do it justice, it was detox (which is way worse than just being hung over). I slept a lot, there were points where I couldn't move without just breaking down in tears... and I was so glad that I'd prepped a little bit so I could eat and tell the family to DIY. I needed nausea meds to keep food down long enough to let me fall asleep on Day 2. The headache lasted for days, but I still had to get out and do things like buy groceries for the new week's meal plan, put them away, and even cook for my family. Day 5 I finally managed the whole day without meds for pain or nausea.
    During that first week, I did actually sweeten things with fruit/juice more than I probably should've. I was drinking black coffee, but also having hot tea during the day (2 cups water and 2 bags tea: 1 black, 1 "fruity" but compliant from a sampler box) which I sweetened with juice squeezed out of Cuties (1 baby orange per mug of tea). I also started keeping ice in my "main" cup so I could grab ice to suck on any time I felt like I would've normally grabbed a mint (I went through a large bag from Kroger every 1-2 weeks before W30). I'm another one who doesn't like regular unflavored water, but I get a good bit of it through my ice due to the amount I go through (and I drink water as the ice melts because it tastes better to me when it's still super-cold).
    Reading here, I had seen quite a few ways to get my soda fix without stepping out of compliance. But I'm a recovering alcoholic, so I am all too aware of what it means if I need a "fix"... it means I'm addicted, which means anything remotely like that thing I craved would only serve to support that addiction rather than help me break free of it. Even adding a splash of fruit juice (especially lemon/lime) to some sparkling water would've been totally SWYPO for me, because I could drink Sprite in place of Coke and be happy as long as I didn't feel the need for the caffeine at the time.
    The day after my Whole30, I drank some Coke. It's not recommended, it definitely wasn't a reintro of only one food group, but I needed to know if it was going to cause those cravings again... because if it did, I wanted to do another 30 days to continue working on getting free of that addiction.
    I'll be honest -- it didn't even taste good. It was syrupy, the carbonation didn't give me the "ahh" feeling I expected, and it tasted more like chemicals than sweetness. I sipped on it very sparingly while we were out (because I didn't want to pay for ice and had forgotten my ice cup at home), then gave the rest to my husband as soon as we walked back in our front door. He hasn't been doing Whole30 with me, and took it gladly... but I just reveled in the fact that even carbonation has no hold on me, anymore!
    Breaking my soda addiction probably wouldn't have happened if I hadn't done Whole30 the way it was intended, complete with sucking it up and making sure I didn't give myself any room for adventures in SWYPO. I feel so much happier knowing that I can continue my (slow and drawn-out) reintroduction without worrying that I'm going to slide right back into my old habits and addictions afterward, because if I can break away from SODA, I'm totally confident that I can break away from anything.
    (On a related note, on that first reintro day I also added some honey to my hot tea, and didn't even notice enough change in flavor for me to bother adding any sweetener to it since then.)
    Putting down the things we're used to is hard, and not recreating them during Whole30 might actually be harder... but finding freedom from the things that are doing more harm than good (in our bodies and minds) is really what this whole process is all about.
  19. Like
    Jihanna reacted to Christie Inge, HHC in What would you do?   
    So, I totally understand the whole not wanting to waste food thing. AND, what I've also realized along the way is that food is always going to get wasted; we have an overabundance of food in the US and unless you are going to ship it off to people in less fortunate countries, you can waste it in the trash or in your body. 
    As far as the neighbor, if it continues to happen, you may need to have an honest conversation with her and perhaps discuss other ways you might be able to connect that isn't food (her actual motivation for bringing you the scones was probably to connect with you). 
  20. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in What do you drink?   
    Soda addiction is something I battled off and on since I was 15 years old, and now 24 years later I've finally kicked the habit. It's one of my biggest NSVs, and doing Whole30 would've been totally worth it (for me) if that was my only gain.
    Prior to Whole30, I draink 1-2 liters of "fully-leaded" Coca-Cola every day. I even polished off the last of my "one last bottle" the evening before my Day 1.
    Week 1 sucked, especially Days 2-4. It was horrifying. I was fighting dehydration, withdrawal, and lovely lady-type issues all at once. "Hangover" doesn't do it justice, it was detox (which is way worse than just being hung over). I slept a lot, there were points where I couldn't move without just breaking down in tears... and I was so glad that I'd prepped a little bit so I could eat and tell the family to DIY. I needed nausea meds to keep food down long enough to let me fall asleep on Day 2. The headache lasted for days, but I still had to get out and do things like buy groceries for the new week's meal plan, put them away, and even cook for my family. Day 5 I finally managed the whole day without meds for pain or nausea.
    During that first week, I did actually sweeten things with fruit/juice more than I probably should've. I was drinking black coffee, but also having hot tea during the day (2 cups water and 2 bags tea: 1 black, 1 "fruity" but compliant from a sampler box) which I sweetened with juice squeezed out of Cuties (1 baby orange per mug of tea). I also started keeping ice in my "main" cup so I could grab ice to suck on any time I felt like I would've normally grabbed a mint (I went through a large bag from Kroger every 1-2 weeks before W30). I'm another one who doesn't like regular unflavored water, but I get a good bit of it through my ice due to the amount I go through (and I drink water as the ice melts because it tastes better to me when it's still super-cold).
    Reading here, I had seen quite a few ways to get my soda fix without stepping out of compliance. But I'm a recovering alcoholic, so I am all too aware of what it means if I need a "fix"... it means I'm addicted, which means anything remotely like that thing I craved would only serve to support that addiction rather than help me break free of it. Even adding a splash of fruit juice (especially lemon/lime) to some sparkling water would've been totally SWYPO for me, because I could drink Sprite in place of Coke and be happy as long as I didn't feel the need for the caffeine at the time.
    The day after my Whole30, I drank some Coke. It's not recommended, it definitely wasn't a reintro of only one food group, but I needed to know if it was going to cause those cravings again... because if it did, I wanted to do another 30 days to continue working on getting free of that addiction.
    I'll be honest -- it didn't even taste good. It was syrupy, the carbonation didn't give me the "ahh" feeling I expected, and it tasted more like chemicals than sweetness. I sipped on it very sparingly while we were out (because I didn't want to pay for ice and had forgotten my ice cup at home), then gave the rest to my husband as soon as we walked back in our front door. He hasn't been doing Whole30 with me, and took it gladly... but I just reveled in the fact that even carbonation has no hold on me, anymore!
    Breaking my soda addiction probably wouldn't have happened if I hadn't done Whole30 the way it was intended, complete with sucking it up and making sure I didn't give myself any room for adventures in SWYPO. I feel so much happier knowing that I can continue my (slow and drawn-out) reintroduction without worrying that I'm going to slide right back into my old habits and addictions afterward, because if I can break away from SODA, I'm totally confident that I can break away from anything.
    (On a related note, on that first reintro day I also added some honey to my hot tea, and didn't even notice enough change in flavor for me to bother adding any sweetener to it since then.)
    Putting down the things we're used to is hard, and not recreating them during Whole30 might actually be harder... but finding freedom from the things that are doing more harm than good (in our bodies and minds) is really what this whole process is all about.
  21. Like
    Jihanna reacted to pags98 in What do you drink?   
    I've said this on the forum a few times now, but he honestly just needs to suck it up (man to man here/tough love).  I drank a minimum of 60 oz of soda per day.  It went down something like this: 44oz soda from the corner store in the morning to get me to lunch.  Water or a 20oz soda at lunch.  One or two 12 oz sodas at home in the evening. 
    I took to Spindrift my first Whole30 and also found a compliant Spearmint Hot Tea to give me a bit of caffeine help.  I had horrible headaches for a few days but then the SpinDrift and Water alone were fine.  By the end of my first Whole30 I could no longer stand the tasted of diet soda.  Now when I absolutely feel like I want one I'll oblige myself with one regular sugar soda but otherwise it's water, sparkling water or SpinDrift.   During my current Whole30 I have had tea once or twice a week and drink at least 80 oz of regular water and (2) 12oz Sparkling Waters of various types a day.  
    Yes it sucks, but it will likely change his perspective on those drinks.  This is still one of my biggest NSVs of Whole30 and it has lasted over 6 months!
  22. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Lorna from Canada in What would you do?   
    I have to agree -- taking them allowed her to feel that her generosity and thoughtfulness was appreciated (which it seems was actually the case, as well). For me, I probably would've frozen them and at least tried one after my Whole30 OR I'd have considered maybe donating them to a local school or church office, something that would make sure they'd get eaten without having to be eaten by me.
  23. Thanks
    Jihanna reacted to Karen in Started Whole30 and My Period is Early/Late   
    One of our members, @Karen, wrote up this explanation a while back of why your period may have come early or late during (usually) your first Whole30. I thought it was far too good to let it be lost in the depths of the forum so I've pinned it to the top of the Ladies Only section. Hopefully if you're a little nervous or worried about your early or "missing" period, this will help explain what may be happening. As with all things on this forum, no one here is medically trained and this information is not meant to be taken as medical advice. If you are nervous or concerned, please see your doctor. ~ Ladyshanny
     
    Here's my synopsis of it all - someone else can chime in if I'm not 100% or if there's more to the story... I'm going off memory and not consulting my sources for the fine details. My cycles used to be all over the place and I took the time to figure it all out, but I'm going by memory here... This applies to those that AREN'T on hormonal birth control.
    Although we tend to think of our cycles in terms of our actual period, ovulation actually runs the show. From the time you have your period until you ovulate, estrogen is dominant. Once your FSH and estrogen levels reach a peak level, your body decides, "hey, I can ovulate now". For most people, this takes about 14 days from the first day of our period to happen, but for some, it can take much longer. Things like stress (eh hem, diet changes!, stress from work/relationships, car accident, etc.) can actually prevent ovulation for a little bit while your body figures out what's going on. After all, it doesn't want to allow you to get pregnant while the body is under stress, so it holds onto that egg until it knows all is well.
    However, once you ovulate, your body has a finite amount of time until you'll get your period. For most, that's 12-14 days. From ovulation until your period, progesterone is dominant. Your progesterone levels raise until it realizes your body isn't pregnant, and then when your progesterone levels drop, that prompts your period, and it starts all over again. Got it? (Interesting side note - progesterone actually causes your body temp to rise. That's why people TTC and trying NOT TC take their temps. When temps rise, you've ovulated, and when it drops, you can expect your period within a day or two.)
     
    If you just started a Whole30 and your period is late, it's quite likely that ovulation was delayed due to stress. You'll still have about 12-14 days from ovulation until your period, so delayed ovulation means delayed period. Granted, there could be other reasons, but if you were completely regular your entire life and all of a sudden this threw things for a loop, that's a possible explanation. That's how it typically is for me. Another reason is that for those that are estrogen-dominant, you may not have as much progesterone, so instead of getting that 12-14 days between your period and ovulation, you might normally, for example, only 8 days. But when you change your diet and balance your hormones, poof, your progesterone levels kick in and you may get a few more good days between ovulation and your period! For those TTC, that's super important. But if you're just counting the days from your last period, it may seem a bit late.
    For those of you that end up with your period earlier than expected while on a Whole30, there can be a few possible theories, but they all depend on where you are in your cycle and where your hormones are at. If your body has been trying to ovulate but it's taking longer than normal due to perceived stress, your endometrium is still thickening that whole time, and your body may need to release some of it (spotting). Your body could even say, "screw it, there's no way we're ovulating this month!" and your period could start without even ovulating (that's an annovulatory cycle). If you've already ovulated and your hormones are in flux, perhaps your progesterone levels have dropped temporarily, which means your period starts sooner than normal instead of getting those 12-14 days between ovulation and your period. I'm sure there are other reasons, but those are my best guesses for those that are curious.
    Rest assured, at some point, your body will figure out that the diet changes are actually a good thing. Typically within a cycle or two, estrogen and progesterone will balance out how they should, your luteal phase (between ovulation and your period) will be the appropriate length, and all is well in the world. For those that are concerned about TTC, I HIGHLY recommend Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Wexler. She explains all this, how to track your cycles (that's the only way I could make sense of my goofy cycles for a while), and how you can correct any oddballs that you run into!