Jihanna

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  1. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from ArtFossil in Detailed Reintroduction Schedule Questions   
    Throughout the reintroduction, the only non-compliant foods you should be eating are the ones that you're testing that day. You may not experience any immediate reactions that you can see during your "recovery" period before starting a new test, but that doesn't mean that continued exposure won't cause an issue... and if you experience any issues, you need to be able to point out exactly what's likely causing it, not be left wondering if it was the newly reintroduced food or one you continued eating.
    The only exception to that is generally the added sugar. I personally wouldn't go overboard adding sugar to everything myself, but when it comes to sugars in things I'm reintroducing (or a small amount in a recipe I'm using for reintroduction), that's completely fine. Once we begin to reintroduce foods, it can be difficult to stick to the no added sugars rule anyway, by virtue of added sugar being in so much of what we want to test.
    I would separate the wine and beer since you're dealing with two different types of alcohol there. I separated just about all of my own foods for reintroduction, though, because I wanted to know (for instance) if certain beans affect me more heavily than some or if quinoa would be better/worse compared to rice. I feel like detailed knowledge is a good thing when it comes to determining what should and shouldn't be part of my everyday diet.  
  2. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from ArtFossil in Detailed Reintroduction Schedule Questions   
    Throughout the reintroduction, the only non-compliant foods you should be eating are the ones that you're testing that day. You may not experience any immediate reactions that you can see during your "recovery" period before starting a new test, but that doesn't mean that continued exposure won't cause an issue... and if you experience any issues, you need to be able to point out exactly what's likely causing it, not be left wondering if it was the newly reintroduced food or one you continued eating.
    The only exception to that is generally the added sugar. I personally wouldn't go overboard adding sugar to everything myself, but when it comes to sugars in things I'm reintroducing (or a small amount in a recipe I'm using for reintroduction), that's completely fine. Once we begin to reintroduce foods, it can be difficult to stick to the no added sugars rule anyway, by virtue of added sugar being in so much of what we want to test.
    I would separate the wine and beer since you're dealing with two different types of alcohol there. I separated just about all of my own foods for reintroduction, though, because I wanted to know (for instance) if certain beans affect me more heavily than some or if quinoa would be better/worse compared to rice. I feel like detailed knowledge is a good thing when it comes to determining what should and shouldn't be part of my everyday diet.  
  3. Thanks
    Jihanna got a reaction from CZC in Need Ideas - Not Hungry and Nauseous   
    @Sharon90 Unfortunately, the suggestion of toast wouldn't be in line with Whole30 rules, because we're not to recreate any baked goods (even with entirely compliant ingredients -- and the linked recipe calls for all-purpose flour, wheat flour, honey, and vanilla extract, all of which are not compliant). Yogurt is possible on Whole30, but it's probably easier to make a compliant one than it is to find one in the store.
    Eating is important, I agree, and not eating will lead to deeper problems... but if the original poster (or anyone else struggling with this kind of an issue) intends to follow Whole30, they'll definitely need to make sure to keep the rules of the program in mind, so any suggestions we make for them should also do that.
    I'm sorry if that sounds harsh, it's not intended to be -- I just believe it's important to support each other within the rules of the program that brought us to this forum  
  4. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from DonnaGail in Can i have Crepini Egg Thins?   
    @DonnaGail When a question is posted here in the "Can I Have?" forum, it's generally because the poster is on-round and wants to know if they can use it during Whole30. The official Whole30 stance on recreations like this is that they're off-limits for everyone on round, even those who "don't have a problem" with those foods. That's the filter that gets applied to questions here, to determine whether a thing is on-plan or should be held until one is exploring food freedom... because it's safe to assume that the person asking is either mid-round at the time or plans to be on-round soon and is trying to prepare.
    Hope that helps to clarify why we're so adamant that the Crepini Egg Thins are definitely not allowed during a round, but could be useful during food freedom  
     
  5. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from TrustyMutsi in Reintroduction Day 3 observations...   
    A whole tablespoon of sugar per cup of coffee seems a bit high, when just coming out of having no added sweeteners for the past 30 days... I read in your other thread that the sugary coffee made you sick, and now seeing how much you added that makes total sense to me. (As a reference, my first added sugar was a little less than a tsp of honey added to 2 cups of hot tea; and when I did finally try adding sugar to my coffee, I started at 1/2 tsp per cup and learned I can handle up to 1 tsp per large mug but more than that one mug of coffee will make me sick to my stomach; since then, I stopped drinking coffee about 3 months ago, except when I grab an occasional cup where I work.)
    Think of Whole30 like rehab. When an addict gets clean, their resistance to the drug of choice is lowered, and they're much more likely to overdose at that point because of that lowered resistance (e.g., they want a hit and grab the dose they used to take, then that overloads their system and problems ensue). Our bodies have the same thing happen during Whole30 -- our resistances are lowered, so if we test the same level of sugar or dairy or whatever that we previously used (especially if we were heavy-handed), we're likely to experience problems. Give your body a little grace by taking it slow on things like this, especially since you noticed that reaction with the coffee on your first try
    I'd definitely suggest total W30 compliance until you feel back to your W30 normal, and then try a day of only added sugar without the caffeine as well (and in smaller amounts than you would've been prone to use prior to your W30 round). Give it a few/handful of days for you to normalize, and then keep moving forward with other stuff.
    Some other ideas on added sugar:
    -- honey in hot tea
    -- a little brown sugar mixed into sweet potato mash
    -- molasses as sweetener for homemade bbq
    -- honey as sweetener for a homemade vinaigrette
  6. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from iwantcandy in Help with Sugar Withdrawals   
    I'm so sorry you're going through such bad sugar withdrawals... but I'll tell you straight-up that there's NO WAY I would've survived the first few days of my first W30 without OTC pain meds. Even if medication is a last resort, please don't make yourself miserable if you can't find relief with natural options.
    That said, some things you might want to try are...
    Temple/scalp/crown massage, especially if you can put your hands on some good essential oils. I typically mix a few drops each of rosemary, peppermint, and lavender into about a half-tablespoon of carrier oil, then massage that into my scalp and all around the "bony perimeter" of my head. This works even better for me if done right after a warm shower, so my scalp pores are open wide.
    Aromatherapy, either with a diffuser or by putting a few drops of essential oil on a piece of jewelry, at your wrists, etc. You can just Google "essential oils for sugar cravings" to get a ton of results. While I've never personally used my EOs to combat cravings, I do know a few people who have done so, and it's definitely helped them through the process.
    Skip fruits and any "sweet" veggies (like roasted sweet potatoes or butternut squash) for the first week or so. This might seem like it's counter-intuitive, but trust me when I say that it's so much harder to actually get past those cravings if you cater to them with a sweet food, even semi-sweet fruits and especially dried fruits. If the withdrawal is hitting you hard, I truly suggest hitting back with all you've got by backing away from anything that feeds your sugar dragon enough to keep it alive and kicking... starve the beast, then enjoy the fruits of your labor (pun intended) once it's sleeping. 
    Also, keep reminding yourself that this is temporary. Not only is the program itself a relatively short-term thing, but your body's withdrawal symptoms should also be fairly short-term as long as you don't prolong the process (see the note above about skipping fruits and the like until your dragon is dreaming). You can do this, but yes it sucks while you're in the middle of the detox.
    This list is not intended to be exhaustive, but does include a few ideas that have helped me and a few of my friends. Good luck in finding something that helps take the edge off the cravings for you.
  7. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Tasha30 in Last day tomorrow and no real change.   
    I definitely saw more differences in my first round (this past January, where my cycle somehow started the same day my W30 did, yikes!) than I did in the second one (cycle in the middle). Our hormones can get all jumbled just from the eating changes, so when we add in the natural hormonal cycle we're dealing with, it can really start to mess with one's head! Doing an extended round that allows you to get through an entire cycle and then some is probably a really good idea, and I hope it works out well for you!
  8. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Anhe in How many servings in recipes?   
    Servings are how many portions the dish should be able to split into for making a meal. So if a recipe has 2 servings, that's either one person who eats it twice or two people who eat it once; 4 servings could be one person eating four times or 3 people eating once and 1 person having leftovers for the next day (not the only options there, obviously, just giving a different example).
    So if the book says it's 2 servings and to have the leftovers the next day, it definitely means that ONE PERSON can eat it for dinner and then have the leftovers the next day, not two meals for two people (that would be 4 servings).
    This isn't an exact science, though, because of the "personalized servings" issue. Some of us just plain eat more than others, and some are satisfied with much less, so you'll have to play around with recipes a bit to find out where you fall and how they work (especially if you haven't been used to following recipes and planning meals like this in the past). If you find that the split-up portion isn't going as far as the recipe thinks it should, then it's worth considering a 1.5x or 2x recipe next time if you want to make sure you've got leftovers; likewise, if you realize it seems to have servings that are much larger than you typically need, you'll know that recipe stretches a little further for you.
    Also remember that most recipes are for a single dish that might not be intended to stand alone, especially in the context of W30. I've not looked over the recipes in the book myself, so I'm not sure if it gives dishes or meal plans, but my personal rule for planning a dinner is protein, starchy veggie, non-starchy veggie, a bit of fat -- sometimes this is in the form of a chili with a side salad, sometimes it's a casserole, sometimes it's totally separate dishes that we put on the plates however we wish... the whole point is to have a rounded meal that is satisfying and won't have us scrounging in the kitchen at 1 in the morning  
    Hope that helps.
  9. Like
    Jihanna reacted to SugarcubeOD in Snacks--when and what to eat?   
    So if you're trying to kick a sugar addiction, feeding it sugar (fruit or dried fruit) is just giving in to cravings with different sugar.  The only way to beat a sugar dragon is to starve it.  Some people eat Lara bars and yes, some of them are compliant depending on the ingredients but they're not recommended and especially not if you're trying to resolve a sugar problem.
    Second, if you want or need a snack, fruit and nuts/nut butters are not your ideal choice.  Nut butter is a fat on the program not a protein (while it has a nominal amount of protein, theres much more fat).  Hardboiled egg and mayo or leftover chicken salad or a couple meatballs and half an avocado... those are protein/fat snacks that would be of better help to you.
  10. Thanks
    Jihanna got a reaction from Settyfitness in Instant pot recipes?   
    I forgot to add that it's insanely easy to do potatoes and sweet potatoes in the pressure cooker, too. You can "bake" them whole (just put them on a trivet above the water) or cut them up and let them stew in water/broth and seasonings (my preference if I'm planning to mash them). If you've got another dish that cooks in roughly the same time as you need for baked potatoes, you can put that in the bottom and put a higher trivet in to do your potatoes at the same time, too... so that's also helpful
    Steamer baskets are wonderful, as well, and gives you additional options for things like steamed broccoli or a California veggie blend.
    One thing I do NOT use mine for, unless I'm trying out a new recipe that calls for it, is soups. I like being able to hover over my soup, taste and season as I go, etc., so I keep those on the stove!
  11. Thanks
    Jihanna got a reaction from Settyfitness in Instant pot recipes?   
    I love my pressure cooker. I don't use it nearly as often as I did the first few weeks I had it (I had a few meals where I literally cooked 3 parts of one meal in the same insert since it was the only one I had, haha)... but there are a few things that I don't cook except in it, and I try to put at least one pressure-cooked main dish in every weekly meal plan. It's practically replaced my crock pot for a lot of things, though I do still love to pull that out also
    Moving on... the things I love to cook in an electric pressure cooker...
    "Boiled Eggs" -- There are several good blog posts out there about doing eggs this way, but I'll boil it down here (ahem).
    -- insert trivet and pour in water (I've used as little as 1 Cup and as much as 1.5 Cup with repeatable success)
    -- place eggs on trivet (I can fit 10 large eggs on mine without stacking or being too crowded)
    -- cover and lock lid, making sure the release valve is closed; manual cook 4 minutes (some say 5, I prefer 4)
    -- once done, natural pressure release FIVE MINUTES, then quick-release the rest
    -- use tongs to move eggs into a bowl of cool/cold water to soak for 5-10 minutes, then store in fridge
    This method produces the most easy-to-peel eggs I've ever cooked, and it's so easy to quickly do as many as I want. They're technically not boiled though, hence the quotes.

    Spaghetti Squash -- We love this in our house, and while it IS perfectly possible to roast them in the oven, I've found that I prefer to do them in the pressure cooker instead. As with the eggs, you'll want to use a trivet to keep the squash above about 1 Cup of water. Slice the squash in half, clean out the seeds, and then place on the trivet (I usually do 1 half at a time, unless both fit easily). Some bloggers say you should have the inside down for cooking, others don't; I've personally found it doesn't change the product too much, apart from needing to drain it if the inside is angled up enough to catch liquid as the steam condenses. If you like crunchier strands, start with 7 minutes and work up to see what works best for you... I do ours for 10 minutes (an older squash that's dried out a bit might need longer to reach the desired level of cook).

    Whole Chicken -- It's insanely easy to do a whole chicken in one of these. Just empty the inner cavity, add whatever seasonings (oils, rubs, spices, herbs stuffed inside, etc.), and cook for 6-10 minutes per pound of chicken. (Many sites/recipes say to cook for 6 minutes per pound, which probably works if the chicken is completely thawed. Mine are usually at least a little frozen, even after a thaw attempt, so I've found it works better to go with 8-10 per pound; so for a 5 pound chicken, I'd probably go with 40-42 minutes.) The most beautiful thing is that it's so easy to change up seasonings every time.

    Just about any Roast -- Change up the seasonings, maybe, but I love doing roasts in the pressure cooker now. It's much easier cleanup, and nearly every recipe I've tried has been phenomenal. This pork roast with apple gravy is my favorites pork recipe so far, and my whole family loved this beef pot roast and veggies one (which is very similar to what I'd do in the crock, but this one's done faster and I think we all agreed it even tasted better than my crock roasts have).

    Barbecue Chicken -- I almost avoided barbecue during my Whole30 because I was scared I wouldn't find a good sauce that I could handle, since my pre-W30 favorite was one of the Sweet Baby Ray's varieties (which undoubtedly would be WAY to sweet for me, now!) Enter the linked recipe. Granted, I adapted it a little to fit my own preferences and what I had on hand (plain mustard instead of spicy brown, and regular paprika instead of smoked due to a "smoke" flavor sensitivity in the household; I also used the suggested seasonings instead of a store-bought rub). My chicken breasts were actually straight out of the freezer thanks to a complete lack of preparation on my part (haha), so I added an extra 6 minutes to my pressurized cook time and this turned out perfectly.

    Power-Veggie Chili -- That's just my name for it, but it fits! As with most things, I adapted it to fit our tastes and needs; this means I left out the cauliflower, cumin, and cayenne, and I subbed in plain paprika instead of smoked. I also made my chili powder on the fly, because that isn't a blend we keep on hand. Everyone loved this, and as my first experience with pumpkin used to thicken broth, I have to say I was very impressed. (We're actually having this again for dinner tonight, despite the fact that it's getting up to nearly 80 today.)

    For recipe searches, I'll make sure to include "pressure" or "pressure cook" in my search. Looking specifically for "InstantPot" recipes can drastically reduce your results, since that's just a brand name and while many bloggers will label their recipes that way, some don't (but both usually include "pressure" in the name and/or directions). Tack "Whole30" on the back of it and you're off to the races ("paleo" can work too, and many of those bloggers will considerately note to remove sweeteners for Whole30, etc.).

    Good luck and have fun!
  12. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from ultrarunnergirl in Do I need to restart...?   
    You're right, whether or not the alcohol would cook off is definitely not the point, and it's good that you realize that even if he didn't. The point is simply that we don't use those types of ingredients during Whole30, plain and simple. That's the bad news.
    The good news is that you're already planning to extend your experience, and based on current progress extending to even just 45 days would provide 30 whole days of compliance (assuming no other off-plan stuff happens). I'd maybe mark the first day post-beef in the calendar or food diary so you know when you've moved away from that, but otherwise allow yourself to breathe and progress normally. It's entirely possible that there won't be any ill effects, but it's also possible that there would be (and taking note of any symptoms and such would be a great idea even in times when you're not trying to determine if something caused a problem).
    The hard news is that if your husband is doing the cooking and shopping, he's going to have to read labels. If you were doing the cooking and shopping, you'd need to read labels to make sure your "already-approved" items are still approved, and he'll need to do the same. Alternatively, if you've got a local place you'd shop at that does online ordering, he could give you his list and you could put the order in (checking ingredients online, as needed)... but it would definitely be best if he'd take ownership of it, because it means that he knows what is and isn't allowed and is going to make sure you're getting what you need.
    Regarding the waste of food -- anytime I've been on round and realized something wasn't compliant after already cooking, I've either allowed others in the family (who weren't on round) to eat that or I've stored it in the freezer for use after my Whole30.
    Good luck!
  13. Like
    Jihanna reacted to chichi in Issues with leafy greens   
    @heb2014 I don't know how you guys are doing now, but I and my partner experienced something similar,--he wasn't even doing the W30, but our together meals changed. It can be frustrating when one person's body reacts totally differently than another person's, but of course, that was the point of this whole thing for me, to figure out what makes you feel your best, and what's seldom worth making yourself feel crappy. It can be kind of disheartening to find it's a 'good for you' food. My husband turned out to have a digestive allergy to raw carrots, and then, when vegetables became a much more significant portion of our meals, we realized he was always having a reaction to cooked carrots, as well, he'd just never eaten a whole bunch of them. Carrots are like my second-favorite vegetable, and he doesn't like my first-favorite! We are careful with all root vegetables with him, parsnips and beets, and it just means that sometimes, I make a big ole batch of something I like, knowing it's just for my lunches, and we are both eating in a way (mostly) that makes us feel good. 
  14. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from DonnaGail in Fig, Apricot or other Jam recipes?   
    I forget which thread it was in, but somewhere here on the forums there had been a question about using jams during Whole30 for certain cooking reasons, and they'd shared a peach jam from Amazon which was sweetened only with fruit juice. I checked that company's offerings, and they have a Royal Fig Jam that is also only sweetened by fruit juice (grape and date), which might work for you in this if you want something you can buy rather than something you can make.
  15. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from DonnaGail in Can i have Crepini Egg Thins?   
    @DonnaGail When a question is posted here in the "Can I Have?" forum, it's generally because the poster is on-round and wants to know if they can use it during Whole30. The official Whole30 stance on recreations like this is that they're off-limits for everyone on round, even those who "don't have a problem" with those foods. That's the filter that gets applied to questions here, to determine whether a thing is on-plan or should be held until one is exploring food freedom... because it's safe to assume that the person asking is either mid-round at the time or plans to be on-round soon and is trying to prepare.
    Hope that helps to clarify why we're so adamant that the Crepini Egg Thins are definitely not allowed during a round, but could be useful during food freedom  
     
  16. Like
    Jihanna reacted to laura_juggles in Can i have Crepini Egg Thins?   
    So, I think it's really great that you're here supporting people and sharing your experience. 
    But can you please maybe be a little more thoughtful about your "it's not a trigger for me so I don't care" attitude? If you're using them now and you're not doing a Whole30, that's fine, but maybe a "they're great for my Food Freedom when I'm not in the middle of a Whole30" could be included? Because it really comes across like your entire Whole30 philosophy is "screw the rules, I'll do what I want". 
  17. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from laura_juggles in Can i have Crepini Egg Thins?   
    Crepini is a crepe made with a flour substitute (cauliflower powder). This makes it totally paleo-friendly, but definitely is against the spirit of Whole30. Making your own crepe would definitely still be against the rules, because it would be a recreation of a pancake-like product. Whisking an egg and frying it thinly is NOT a crepe, however -- it's an egg, nothing else added to make it crepe-like.
    For ongoing health, it's fine. But if you're mid-round then it's not okay for Whole30.
  18. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from laura_juggles in Can i have Crepini Egg Thins?   
    Crepini is a crepe made with a flour substitute (cauliflower powder). This makes it totally paleo-friendly, but definitely is against the spirit of Whole30. Making your own crepe would definitely still be against the rules, because it would be a recreation of a pancake-like product. Whisking an egg and frying it thinly is NOT a crepe, however -- it's an egg, nothing else added to make it crepe-like.
    For ongoing health, it's fine. But if you're mid-round then it's not okay for Whole30.
  19. Like
    Jihanna reacted to laura_juggles in Can i have Crepini Egg Thins?   
    Because it would be a whole slippery slope of contradictions and confusion if every single rule in the Whole30 looked like this:
    No pancakes or recreations of baked goods (tortillas, waffles, muffins, etc). Unless you don't usually eat pancakes. Or toast. Or tacos. Or unless you really don't actually like muffins, but you're so tired of eggs that a concoction of almond flour, eggs, and fruit will be the one thing that keeps you from going off the rails and housing the package of cookies you left in the pantry for your kids. 
    -----
    The thinly cooked scrambled egg thing mentioned above is not a crepe in the same way that spiral-cut zucchini is not pasta. The first is an omelette and the second is squash cut in thin strips. Cooking or cutting something in a slightly different way to achieve your purpose (like cauliflower "rice" or zoodles) is completely different than taking a compliant thing (i.e. a head of cauliflower) and mixing a bunch of other stuff in it to make it something indistinguishable from what it originally was (i.e. "wraps" made with "cauliflower powder"...what has to happen to a head of cauliflower to turn it into a powder? That kinda screams franken-food to me). 
    I feel like you're seriously getting hung up on words rather than the spirit of the Whole30. 
     
  20. Thanks
    Jihanna got a reaction from DonnaGail in Pancakes/Trail food   
    Just a quick note, because I think it might bear saying to avoid confusion -- my previous post is not in any way directed at the original poster. The OP was trying to get some ideas regarding trail food that follows the Whole30 food group restrictions while possibly (but not necessarily) following the W30 guidelines; this coming after having successfully completed a Whole30 round and liking how her body feels when the restricted food groups are removed, but wanting to have a convenient (and light) way of carrying additional protein on the trail. That's totally understandable, and seems to me like that's part of learning to ride her own bike -- she's taking what works well for her into her everyday life, allowing for some flexibility because sometimes life demands that (and darnit, sometimes we just plain need it).
    My previous post was directed specifically at the idea of planning a "Whole30" round with the mindset that the rules don't matter, because they really do, especially for people who have never done an elimination diet and may be struggling with severe food relationship issues.
  21. Like
    Jihanna reacted to ArtFossil in Day 9 & feeling hopeless   
    First of all, not everyone feels terrific while doing a Whole30! It does help to follow the recommendations and the meal template and make sure you are getting enough protein, veggies and fats. It also helps to make sure you salt your food as you are not getting added salt in processed food. And many people feel better with at least one serving of starch vegetables every day. Finally, drinking water--HALF your weight in ounces--is key, so just do it!
    Secondly, a Whole30 doesn't have to be expensive. Where I live, avocados, shrimp and (especially) compliant bacon are expensive so I would be limiting those foods (I never at bacon on my Whole30 because either couldn't find it or I couldn't afford it.). You can eat cheaply by roasting lots of vegetables (just olive oil, salt and pepper), eating things like grilled chicken breasts, and making your own mayonnaise and ghee (clarified butter). I roasted a lot of vegetables, made a lot of frittatas and tuna salad, and used my Forman grill almost every night and kept things very simple, with balsamic vinaigrette, dump ranch and a compliant curry sauce as my only dressings/sauces. I didn't make any "recipes;" I just made what I would already eat compliant.
    On a more philosophical note, Whole30 is an elimination diet. It is designed so that if you comply and you eliminate completely foods that are common sources of inflammation for 30 days and then systematically reintroduce these food groups (not repeating them) during your Reintroduction, you will have invaluable data. That is, you will know exactly how YOU respond to these foods so that you can make an informed and conscious choice whether to eat them going forward. If you want this information, you'll stick with it.
  22. Like
    Jihanna reacted to DonnaGail in Whole 30 Shopping List - Confusing   
    Just wanted you ladies to know I am finally figuring everything out. Thanks so much for your help. For the past few months, I have designated most of my pantry shelves to Whole 30 compliant foods and in my fridge. Also created an Excel spreadsheet with all my favorite compliant foods and ingredients that includes columns with the store names I purchased them, either local or online eliminating redoing research and adding to the spreadsheet compliant items as I find them. Makes eating healthier ongoing so much easier! 
  23. Like
    Jihanna got a reaction from Tasha30 in I THOUGHT i was on Day 24... until I read my medication label :(   
    While that's totally possible, it should probably be noted that none of us should be dropping prescribed medications without discussing the decision with our respective doctors... doing so improperly can cause severe problems, so I honestly hope no one feels so amazing on Whole30 that they just decide to get off medications on their own, particularly not before they've established a long-term plan which promotes health (rather than returning to whatever diet and lifestyle had them in pain previously).
    That said, I do love it when dietary changes provide the template for breaking free of medications  
  24. Thanks
    Jihanna got a reaction from heb2014 in Issues with leafy greens   
    If it's something that has always caused an issue for him, then he should probably avoid them. It's something he can certainly discuss with his doctor, but it could be something as simple as a sensitivity to leafy greens (though there's potential for other issues that seems less likely if these are the only things that cause problems). I'd suggest that there's no need for him to be miserable just to test whether or not this will improve within the framework of Whole30, though it could be that you could test cooked greens during reintroductions to see if those give him the same type of symptoms that he experiences with salads.
  25. Like
    Jihanna reacted to ShannonM816 in What A Serving of Eggs Looks Like   
    If your meals are keeping you satisfied 4-5 hours at a time, you're good.
    Often, we see people who come from a background of calorie restriction who continue to limit their meal sizes the way they would if they were counting calories, sometimes purposefully, sometimes subconsciously. Mostly, this was a post to encourage those people to eat as much as they need to eat, even if it seems like a lot of food, and to say that it is okay to eat more than what they may be used to, if that's what it takes to stay satisfied and avoid snacking between meals.