ScoutFinch

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  1. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from jjwhole30 in Fibromyalgia/Chronic Fatigue   
    The problem with recommending the autoimmune protocol is that fibro is not understood to be an autoimmune disease. I would suggest everyone be *very* careful implementing or suggesting eating restrictions that have more potential to result in disordered eating. "Keep doing what you're doing" might not be the best advice.
     
    The sad truth is that fibromyalgia is a very, very difficult condition to live with. Sometimes food choices help, and sometimes they don't. I have had the best luck with strength training, because it allows for the greatest amount of movement from day-to-day. But the groggy, foggy, painful exhaustion can hit me no matter what I'm doing otherwise.
     
    It's very hard to be strong and to keep on. I hate it when they say fibro patients "are known to be perfectionists" (does that mean, um, unlike yourself, Doc?) but it's really true that Job 1 has to be compassion for ourselves and what we can do today. If that means three hot baths and four hours on the couch with One Life to Live, then that's today. Remember that you are whole, no matter how unwell you are.
  2. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from suzannes in Sugar Addict? Is it possible to actually do this?   
    What a great thread--I could have "liked" every single post here, and it was almost embarrassing to see how much I have denied what a problem this is for me as well. No moderation at all--one person said in another post, she can have a half-open bottle of wine on the counter for a week and not touch it, and yet scarf down every bit of sugar in the house. This is the same for me, dozens of frozen chocolate chip cookies, frozen slices of cake, etc. I could not wait to thaw out before I ate them, and lots of that kind of eating alone, not in front of others. There is alcoholism on both sides of my family and as a little girl we often ended the night eating a big bag of candy bars before bed while the adults had something to drink. I think it really must be the case that alcoholism is an extreme form of sugar addiction, but I don't have any problem calling sugar addictive or treating it as such. When I finish the W30, I don't see myself adding sugar back in any time soon, barring the slight amount of honey in my favorite boxed beef broth. As to starchy vegetables, at first they were more of an item on my plate, but now I just find them satisfying and a necessary source of calories and energy.
  3. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from naomilemoyne in Anyone have a good whole chicken recipe?   
    The simplest is the best. Here's Martha Rose Shulman's method, one I even wrote an essay about, it is so charming:
    Wash chicken in cold water inside and out, pat dry. Salt and pepper the inside. Rub a goodly amount of olive oil into the skin, then salt and pepper the breast, place the chicken that side down in an oiled shallow roasting pan. Rub oil on the back side, salt and pepper again.
    Roast fifteen minutes at 450, then reduce the heat to 350. Turn the bird over about halfway through the total time (you want about 20 minutes total roasting time per pound; I get very fresh chickens so I usually go an extra 10 minutes or so). Be sure to shut the oven door when you take the chicken out to turn it so as to not lose heat.
    I turn the bird with a couple of wooden spoons, one inside and one out. It's not elegant, but it keeps the skin from being torn on metal tongs.
    For variety, add lemon juice, lemon zest, rosemary, oregano, tarragon, or any chicken-friendly herb, dried or fresh. This is truly my favorite way to eat chicken. The breast is moist and the dark meat is to die.
  4. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from jjwhole30 in Fibromyalgia/Chronic Fatigue   
    The problem with recommending the autoimmune protocol is that fibro is not understood to be an autoimmune disease. I would suggest everyone be *very* careful implementing or suggesting eating restrictions that have more potential to result in disordered eating. "Keep doing what you're doing" might not be the best advice.
     
    The sad truth is that fibromyalgia is a very, very difficult condition to live with. Sometimes food choices help, and sometimes they don't. I have had the best luck with strength training, because it allows for the greatest amount of movement from day-to-day. But the groggy, foggy, painful exhaustion can hit me no matter what I'm doing otherwise.
     
    It's very hard to be strong and to keep on. I hate it when they say fibro patients "are known to be perfectionists" (does that mean, um, unlike yourself, Doc?) but it's really true that Job 1 has to be compassion for ourselves and what we can do today. If that means three hot baths and four hours on the couch with One Life to Live, then that's today. Remember that you are whole, no matter how unwell you are.
  5. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from Fancy in Welcome Baby Atticus   
    Best name ever! Congratulations, and welcome to one of the most wonderful times of your life. Blessings on you all.
  6. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from jjwhole30 in Fibromyalgia/Chronic Fatigue   
    Also, jj, if you think you might have Lyme or Epstein-Barr, best to get them checked. Even ruling them out would be a great relief, I would think.
  7. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from jjwhole30 in Fibromyalgia/Chronic Fatigue   
    The problem with recommending the autoimmune protocol is that fibro is not understood to be an autoimmune disease. I would suggest everyone be *very* careful implementing or suggesting eating restrictions that have more potential to result in disordered eating. "Keep doing what you're doing" might not be the best advice.
     
    The sad truth is that fibromyalgia is a very, very difficult condition to live with. Sometimes food choices help, and sometimes they don't. I have had the best luck with strength training, because it allows for the greatest amount of movement from day-to-day. But the groggy, foggy, painful exhaustion can hit me no matter what I'm doing otherwise.
     
    It's very hard to be strong and to keep on. I hate it when they say fibro patients "are known to be perfectionists" (does that mean, um, unlike yourself, Doc?) but it's really true that Job 1 has to be compassion for ourselves and what we can do today. If that means three hot baths and four hours on the couch with One Life to Live, then that's today. Remember that you are whole, no matter how unwell you are.
  8. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from NY2LA2MONTREAL in Fibromyalgia/Chronic Fatigue   
    Now at Day Seven today. For the past three days, I've been feeling like pain is moving through my arms and legs like some kind of hot nasty liquid, and fog is a little worse than it had been. I'm trying to track when this happens, and we've also had some severe damp weather moving through. But digestion is better, skin clearing up, and on a few days energy levels have been pretty great. Will keep on keeping on, and sending good wishes to everyone else here struggling with this.
    lulucandoit, I am going to do the 30 regularly, but will also see after that if another 30 days without nightshades makes a difference--two days ago I had a larger serving than usual of tomatoes, and about an hour later did feel an increase in pain and lowering of energy. Could have been a coincidence and I'll do the first Whole30 without trying to make that determination first, though, but thanks for mentioning that.
  9. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from Angela Poliquin in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    Grapefruit is just a little too sweet for them.
    They ask for the chuck roast, and "leave the fat on."
    Steak and eggs sounds like sort of a sissy breakfast.
    They have candid conversations with total strangers about their gastrointestinal function.
    They break down and sob uncontrollably at the sight of toddlers drinking 100% fruit juice.
    They wonder how many miles they can really clock running per week.
    They dream about Ring Dings and whiskey instead of sex.
    Their real men eat crustless quiche.
  10. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from Angela Poliquin in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    Grapefruit is just a little too sweet for them.
    They ask for the chuck roast, and "leave the fat on."
    Steak and eggs sounds like sort of a sissy breakfast.
    They have candid conversations with total strangers about their gastrointestinal function.
    They break down and sob uncontrollably at the sight of toddlers drinking 100% fruit juice.
    They wonder how many miles they can really clock running per week.
    They dream about Ring Dings and whiskey instead of sex.
    Their real men eat crustless quiche.
  11. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from RaspberryRose in How do you heal the mind??   
    I agree very much with Amy--thinking about what's happening to you in mind and body as symptoms of something that is harmful to you is the most helpful way to look at it. I think guilting yourself and chewing yourself out are only counter-productive, in both the short and the long run. Also, for me the time spent experimenting with what is truly a food that harms my health, puts on weight (which I now see as not as a punishment for having done something bad, but a signal from my body that it is having to compensate for some toxic element within it, which also helps a lot), is not wasted time--it's time spent learning, and that for me has been very important. It's a nice accomplishment to do a W30, but the bigger picture is what you're after--not "compliance" to be "compliant" with a certain philosophy/religion of eating, but eating so that your body and mind are nourished, and the cravings and habits of the past are a bit easier not to choose.
     
    And, like they say about quitting smoking, the more times you do it, the better chance of success you have, not the opposite as would seem intuitively true. Every time you "start over," that's a positive in the bank, and more likely that you'll more often choose what's better for you.
  12. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from 1Maryann in HELP! Other Breakfast Ideas - non-eggs   
    If you can stand meat, I really enjoy a bowl of beef stew (recipe in Well Fed), along with vegetables and sometimes a piece of fruit.
  13. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from mamaxt in Fibromyalgia/Chronic Fatigue   
    I also have fibro and was on disability for three years, about two years after the diagnosis in 2002. I started a couple of months ago thinking harder about diet, very difficult for me to do, but as these things often happen, I started with Web.Md, which led me to Wheat Belly, which led me to Summer Tomato's blog, which led me to Perfect Health Diet, which led me here, all pretty quickly. Wheat Belly allows for so many ways to eat inflammatory foods (most of which I didn't know were potentially toxic, like beans). PHD seems like a very good "off-Whole 30" way to eat, but when I found Whole 30 after that (via a blog from a lovely Indian guy whose name I can't remember, if somebody does--it's not Kamal, but something like that, and he reviews Paleo blogs quite a bit--actually it was through him that I found the blog tummyrumblr and on that blog found this--sorry--you know what thinking things through is like when you have chronic pain and fatigue!)
    Anyway, I'm officially on Day 0 because I reset after four days, realizing that I'd been eating probably too much fruit, plus some salted roasted nuts that may account for the bloating every evening. So, that's my first question: how much fruit do you all eat and still feel okay? (I know I hold on to fruit as my sweet tooth fairy.) But last night, I slept all the way through the night for the first time in ages, and I think reflux is improving, too.
    Pain yesterday was very harsh. On Wheat Belly, after the first four days I then felt terrific for about three weeks, and then the pain came back double at least.
    As to exercise, in 2008 I decided to train to walk a half-marathon, because of something I'd read again about exercise and aging. I figured if the fibro was too much for the goal, at least I'd have been walking several times a week. In the program I used on Prevention.com, you had to include one day of cross-training, and for the first time I started to lift weights regulary (1 pound for some exercises, body weight on others). What I found almost immediately was that strength training in particular cut my fibro pain drastically, probably in half or more.
    Now (as now, having been out of the gym for two weeks fighting an infection), when I don't strength train, the pain comes back in full force. Why this should be so I can't tell you, but it's definitely been the case for the past four years, very reliable. Right now I lift on my own once a week, and work with a trainer using TRX, kettle bells, and other "functional" weights (my trainer one of those human performance guys), and it's really good. I tried 3x/week and that was too much.
    This also makes other exercise very doable. I walk, jog a little, and have discovered the rowing machine, which is wonderful beyond words.
    I don't get to the gym every day, but aim for 4-5 times a week, and try to walk a little every day, and compliment the activity with about twice as much rest as I worked out, and that seems to be a good balance for me.
    I am really hoping that adding this piece of non-inflammatory eating will take the rest of the edge off, since I can no longer tolerate pain meds of any kind.
    Thank you for staring this thread!
  14. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from melcrawf in How to reintro when I'm not interested in ever eating many of those things again   
    I agree--I did a full reintro of dairy, and had no problem with it, so that while I don't think I'd make a habit of eating dairy, I know that it won't totally knock me off and I can enjoy a latte when I choose. Sugar and flour were another experience altogether--and I'm glad I know that now. Will be rare if ever that I choose to eat those. I've never been a huge fan of rice, so while that's an okay food, I won't eat it often, probably not at all would I make it at home. Legumes another rarity--I'd eat good peanut butter if it were offered in something that didn't have sugar in it, and I really love ham and bean soup, but that would be something I'd be just as happy to have a bowl of once or twice a year if I made it myself.
  15. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from Angela Poliquin in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    Grapefruit is just a little too sweet for them.
    They ask for the chuck roast, and "leave the fat on."
    Steak and eggs sounds like sort of a sissy breakfast.
    They have candid conversations with total strangers about their gastrointestinal function.
    They break down and sob uncontrollably at the sight of toddlers drinking 100% fruit juice.
    They wonder how many miles they can really clock running per week.
    They dream about Ring Dings and whiskey instead of sex.
    Their real men eat crustless quiche.
  16. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from RaspberryRose in How do you heal the mind??   
    I agree very much with Amy--thinking about what's happening to you in mind and body as symptoms of something that is harmful to you is the most helpful way to look at it. I think guilting yourself and chewing yourself out are only counter-productive, in both the short and the long run. Also, for me the time spent experimenting with what is truly a food that harms my health, puts on weight (which I now see as not as a punishment for having done something bad, but a signal from my body that it is having to compensate for some toxic element within it, which also helps a lot), is not wasted time--it's time spent learning, and that for me has been very important. It's a nice accomplishment to do a W30, but the bigger picture is what you're after--not "compliance" to be "compliant" with a certain philosophy/religion of eating, but eating so that your body and mind are nourished, and the cravings and habits of the past are a bit easier not to choose.
     
    And, like they say about quitting smoking, the more times you do it, the better chance of success you have, not the opposite as would seem intuitively true. Every time you "start over," that's a positive in the bank, and more likely that you'll more often choose what's better for you.
  17. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from RaspberryRose in How do you heal the mind??   
    I agree very much with Amy--thinking about what's happening to you in mind and body as symptoms of something that is harmful to you is the most helpful way to look at it. I think guilting yourself and chewing yourself out are only counter-productive, in both the short and the long run. Also, for me the time spent experimenting with what is truly a food that harms my health, puts on weight (which I now see as not as a punishment for having done something bad, but a signal from my body that it is having to compensate for some toxic element within it, which also helps a lot), is not wasted time--it's time spent learning, and that for me has been very important. It's a nice accomplishment to do a W30, but the bigger picture is what you're after--not "compliance" to be "compliant" with a certain philosophy/religion of eating, but eating so that your body and mind are nourished, and the cravings and habits of the past are a bit easier not to choose.
     
    And, like they say about quitting smoking, the more times you do it, the better chance of success you have, not the opposite as would seem intuitively true. Every time you "start over," that's a positive in the bank, and more likely that you'll more often choose what's better for you.
  18. Like
    ScoutFinch reacted to AmyS in How do you heal the mind??   
    One thing to keep in mind with all of this is that the sugar, gluten, and grains bring on negative self-talk and harsh self-judgment and depression.  It can take some time to work it out of our systems enough to feel the relief.  But a lot of that feeling of not being able to do it and of guilt and feeling ashamed and all of that sort of icky feeling cluster of emotional gunk is a symptom of the sugar overload in our bodies.  It's not a moral response to a bad choice.  It is literally a physical symptom of too much sugar in our bodies.  And we have to give ourselves enough time to let the sugar out of our bodies during the start of a Whole30 - those first days and maybe weeks, we'll still have some of that negative self-talk and depression from the sugar.  But I think it REALLY helps to understand that it's not a real feeling of guilt or a true shame or something like that.  It is a physical symptom of too much sugar. 
     
    I'm not saying that's the total picture for everyone - I know many of us fight food addictions of one form or another.  But when we get in the cycle of "I need to get off of sugar/I can't get off of sugar/I feel guilty/I'm depressed" etc. - that's a symptom, not a moral weakness.  Basically, you feel bloated and depressed.  Both are symptoms.
     
    I hope that makes sense, and helps some.  I feel this very often, and even with almost a year away from sugar except on planned occasions, my body chemistry has so many decades of reaching for it that I find the cravings nearly intolerable some days.  And so it really helps me a whole lot to understand that those cravings are not weakness, they're merely one more symptom of sugar overload in my body.  (Same applies to dairy and grains for me.)
  19. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from jp_atkinson in Third Whole30   
    And maybe get yourself to a meeting? "I become a jerk when I drink" sounds like something beyond a food problem. Congratulations on five years of marriage, and may you have many, many more.
  20. Like
    ScoutFinch reacted to annabel in I can't get started...   
    Maybe just commit to doing it for 10 days and then re-evaluating at the end of that, or even just a Monday to Friday. Or try cutting out some of the bad stuff that you're eating and increase what you're cutting out each week. Derval posted a great plan for going primal without really trying in this thread: http://forum.whole9life.com/topic/9420-im-always-hungry-now/page__p__94719__hl__+paleo%20+steps__fromsearch__1#entry94719
  21. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from jp_atkinson in Third Whole30   
    I was talking to a behavioral specialist recently who said that multiple attempts to reach a goal are in fact positive--it's how most people quit smoking, for example. Framing your attempts to reach your health goals in this positive way is likely pretty important. You are more likely not to be a person with no discipline and little accountability (research seems to bear out that people who try to lose weight are quite the opposite in fact), but rather a person in his 40s who has a very typical physiological response to eating processed foods. And of course that problem gets snagged on all the feelings that are attached to foods and eating.
    I know that there are foods for me that are, as they say here, "brakes off," and it's not likely that I'll try to add them back any time soon (I much enjoy all of the ones you mention, too, though I go straight for the regular chips). But I've also benefited so much from doing the W30 as a way to observe when the times are that I want to reach for those foods--what feelings, etc., and though this is my first one (just finished), I know that I'll do this again, probably a couple of times a year.
    I wish you all good luck and success with this W30, and hope it's a process of revealing things to you that are very helpful.
  22. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from Robin Strathdee in W30 and weight loss...NO GUARANTEES   
    We may call it chronic under-eating, but if your body experiences it as starving, it will want to gain weight first once you begin to feed it again (research first done at U of MN bears this out). Over time, though, it is most likely (but not guaranteed) that your weight will normalize to the best weight for you. In your case, it may just be that you need a longer period of time to see results that you want. In the meantime, congratulations for having done so well! (and throw out the damn scale!
  23. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from LadyM in My writing suffers with Whole 30   
    I have so totally given up being the angst-filled, tortured artist. Most of the time, they are just awful writers!
  24. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from Kniptionapamp in Question re: weight loss recommendations   
    I've noticed looking at several mainline paleo-based eating plans that the recommendations for weight loss seem to be pretty contradictory in terms of what to limit. Sisson and Taubes say, up the fat, reduce or eliminate carbs. Wolf says lay off the fat until you reach where you want to be. Hartwigs say keep at least one fat at every meal regardless and keep a rein on fruit consumption.
    I understand that all of them also say many other things about weight loss, but recommended restrictions seem to be the most contradictory. For myself, I think it would be foolish (not to mention a setup for failure) for a woman of my age to take fat out of the diet, but I am curious if anyone knows why there is this disparity in the recommendations.
  25. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from 1Maryann in HELP! Other Breakfast Ideas - non-eggs   
    If you can stand meat, I really enjoy a bowl of beef stew (recipe in Well Fed), along with vegetables and sometimes a piece of fruit.