ScoutFinch

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  1. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from whitjm5 in Question re: weight loss recommendations   
    The explanation for the sleep comes from Robb Wolf, and he explains it well on his blog, but I think it's also treated pretty well in ISWF also. Mostly has to do with circadian rhythms and their effect on cortisol, if I'm remembering it correctly, and the less cortisol that gets dumped into your system, the less your system hangs on to fat. Anyway, I got blackout shades and disconnected the fire alarm in my room (there's one right outside the door, so I'm not going to burn up) to get rid of that light, and I have an alarm clock that only lights up when you press the top. What I'm finding is that I've gradually gone from only being able to sleep four hours at a stretch, to almost seven each night (I take Natural Calm before bed as well).
    One of the main reasons I started W30 apart from stopping weight gain (I'll be happy about that even if I don't lose an appreciable amount of weight over time) is that I can no longer take pain meds for fibromyalgia, and sleep disturbance seems to have a big effect on pain (and with fibro you also get terrible cognitive cloudiness, memory problems, sensory disturbances like feeling you can taste noise in your mouth). I'm already noticing that pain is less, I wake up clearer and less feeling depressed (never been a big caffeine drinker so am pretty sure it's not that), and my memory is a zillion times better than it was four months ago, seriously. I'm also turning off computers, television, and lights about an hour before I go to bed, watching the sun set naturally. It means I go to bed pretty early right now, but I'm liking that!
    Your mileage may vary--I like that one! Thanks!
  2. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from whitjm5 in Question re: weight loss recommendations   
    Thank you, but don't know YMMV? (not a texter!) Still am wondering the reasons behind the suggestions, since they seem so disparate.
    I also began losing once I cut fats about in half, but also I am pretty sure sleeping in a pitch black room at night now is making a difference also.
  3. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from whitjm5 in Question re: weight loss recommendations   
    I've noticed looking at several mainline paleo-based eating plans that the recommendations for weight loss seem to be pretty contradictory in terms of what to limit. Sisson and Taubes say, up the fat, reduce or eliminate carbs. Wolf says lay off the fat until you reach where you want to be. Hartwigs say keep at least one fat at every meal regardless and keep a rein on fruit consumption.
    I understand that all of them also say many other things about weight loss, but recommended restrictions seem to be the most contradictory. For myself, I think it would be foolish (not to mention a setup for failure) for a woman of my age to take fat out of the diet, but I am curious if anyone knows why there is this disparity in the recommendations.
  4. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from CraftyCarnivore in Anyone have a good whole chicken recipe?   
    The simplest is the best. Here's Martha Rose Shulman's method, one I even wrote an essay about, it is so charming:
    Wash chicken in cold water inside and out, pat dry. Salt and pepper the inside. Rub a goodly amount of olive oil into the skin, then salt and pepper the breast, place the chicken that side down in an oiled shallow roasting pan. Rub oil on the back side, salt and pepper again.
    Roast fifteen minutes at 450, then reduce the heat to 350. Turn the bird over about halfway through the total time (you want about 20 minutes total roasting time per pound; I get very fresh chickens so I usually go an extra 10 minutes or so). Be sure to shut the oven door when you take the chicken out to turn it so as to not lose heat.
    I turn the bird with a couple of wooden spoons, one inside and one out. It's not elegant, but it keeps the skin from being torn on metal tongs.
    For variety, add lemon juice, lemon zest, rosemary, oregano, tarragon, or any chicken-friendly herb, dried or fresh. This is truly my favorite way to eat chicken. The breast is moist and the dark meat is to die.
  5. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from klyons1970 in HELP! Other Breakfast Ideas - non-eggs   
    If you can stand meat, I really enjoy a bowl of beef stew (recipe in Well Fed), along with vegetables and sometimes a piece of fruit.
  6. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from 1Maryann in How to reintro when I'm not interested in ever eating many of those things again   
    I hear you. Do I ever hear you! You don't really know the meaning of the word regret until you've felt that one. Wow.
  7. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from CraftyCarnivore in Anyone have a good whole chicken recipe?   
    The simplest is the best. Here's Martha Rose Shulman's method, one I even wrote an essay about, it is so charming:
    Wash chicken in cold water inside and out, pat dry. Salt and pepper the inside. Rub a goodly amount of olive oil into the skin, then salt and pepper the breast, place the chicken that side down in an oiled shallow roasting pan. Rub oil on the back side, salt and pepper again.
    Roast fifteen minutes at 450, then reduce the heat to 350. Turn the bird over about halfway through the total time (you want about 20 minutes total roasting time per pound; I get very fresh chickens so I usually go an extra 10 minutes or so). Be sure to shut the oven door when you take the chicken out to turn it so as to not lose heat.
    I turn the bird with a couple of wooden spoons, one inside and one out. It's not elegant, but it keeps the skin from being torn on metal tongs.
    For variety, add lemon juice, lemon zest, rosemary, oregano, tarragon, or any chicken-friendly herb, dried or fresh. This is truly my favorite way to eat chicken. The breast is moist and the dark meat is to die.
  8. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from Tom Denham in How to reintro when I'm not interested in ever eating many of those things again   
    I agree--I did a full reintro of dairy, and had no problem with it, so that while I don't think I'd make a habit of eating dairy, I know that it won't totally knock me off and I can enjoy a latte when I choose. Sugar and flour were another experience altogether--and I'm glad I know that now. Will be rare if ever that I choose to eat those. I've never been a huge fan of rice, so while that's an okay food, I won't eat it often, probably not at all would I make it at home. Legumes another rarity--I'd eat good peanut butter if it were offered in something that didn't have sugar in it, and I really love ham and bean soup, but that would be something I'd be just as happy to have a bowl of once or twice a year if I made it myself.
  9. Like
    ScoutFinch reacted to MelliebuStacey in Can I have...a relationship?   
    My $0.02..? I think that you've become consciously aware of an emotional eating trigger--kudos! If he's worth your time, he'll support you through this, and at the end of the 30 days, you'll be closer than imaginable right now! If he isn't (and the stress of being with him for whatever reason keeps poking at the dormant Sugar Dragon)...let him go, and find yourself a man who loves, appreciates, and respects you for taking the time and energy necessary to fuel the healthiest possible version of yourself!
  10. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from MelliebuStacey in Can I have...a relationship?   
    I think a topic thread for dealing with the emotional issues that come up would be great. I never know where to put this kind of post, either, and emotional eating by far has been the most to deal with through this whole thing. I realize none of the moderators is a counselor, though! But a place to vent that doesn't get in the way of the actual forum topic sounds good.
  11. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from Krista Billows Rodriguez in W30 and weight loss...NO GUARANTEES   
    We may call it chronic under-eating, but if your body experiences it as starving, it will want to gain weight first once you begin to feed it again (research first done at U of MN bears this out). Over time, though, it is most likely (but not guaranteed) that your weight will normalize to the best weight for you. In your case, it may just be that you need a longer period of time to see results that you want. In the meantime, congratulations for having done so well! (and throw out the damn scale!
  12. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from kb0426 in CRANKY   
    Eating a cookie will not fix any of these problems.
  13. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from Krista Billows Rodriguez in W30 and weight loss...NO GUARANTEES   
    We may call it chronic under-eating, but if your body experiences it as starving, it will want to gain weight first once you begin to feed it again (research first done at U of MN bears this out). Over time, though, it is most likely (but not guaranteed) that your weight will normalize to the best weight for you. In your case, it may just be that you need a longer period of time to see results that you want. In the meantime, congratulations for having done so well! (and throw out the damn scale!
  14. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from Moluv in My writing suffers with Whole 30   
    If you just take alcohol (and then factor in the bajillions of us for whom sugar might as well be liquor), it's a well-observed thing to believe that when you're loaded, you're doing great work. For absolutely sure feeling like the impulse gates have been let down leads to, or can lead to, feeling more free to do the work. But often often often you look back at what you did at that point and it turns out to be, if not outright bad, not very impressive work, or not very different work than you would have done sober.
    I am convinced that it's very possible to develop new habits and rituals that don't have anything to do with food that will let writers and artists access the inner permission to get started and to be fully creative. For myself, I know for sure that when I feel clear and well, my work is far better, if not as easy to get to.
  15. Like
    ScoutFinch reacted to Jtandi in Ever slip up...ever?!   
    Michelle - I think it is so fantastic you can be so honest with yourself, and coming on here actually shows how dedicated and serious you are about your process! don't beat yourself up, keep going, and if possible add days on to the back.
    I took very seriously the advice in ISWF that said it's only 30 days. just 30 days. and also the advice to not even think of a slip as an option. I needed to hold on to that many many times. I am on day 98 of a whole100 - the first of any type of whole_ for me. I really feel, for me, this is life and death. I am such a severe sugar addict I felt as though I was heading for type 2 diabetes and obesity among other physical ailments if I didn't make some serious changes. it helps that I work in an ER and see on a daily basis what this looks like...the diabetics with amputations, dialysis, etc.
    I feel a huge part of this process is learning to be honest with ourselves and our food choices (you always have a choice) and I believe that's exactly what you are doing!
  16. Like
    ScoutFinch reacted to kb0426 in CRANKY   
    Eating a cookie will not fix any of these problems .
    You are welcome.
    Sending happy vibes out to you!
  17. Like
    ScoutFinch reacted to MyWar in CRANKY   
    I'm on day 14, and I am in a terrible mood. I slept through my alarm, forgot my breakfast and lunch, forgot my medication, couldn't put on makeup, can't get anything done at work, and overall just want to lay under my desk until 5pm.
    Please remind me that eating a cookie will not fix any of these problems. Thank you in advance.
  18. Like
    ScoutFinch reacted to jennrider in My writing suffers with Whole 30   
    Very interesting topic. I find thoughts flow when someone has pissed me off. I'm fairly laid back so I don't get this overflowing of thought too often. About the third week of my first W30, I was really able to turn inward for inspiration. There was a calmer, deeper tone to my writing. I don't write for public view, but have journaled since high school. I noticed that by not having a candy bar or glass of wine as an escape, I had to really look at what was going on inside my crazy head. I find that I get that bubbly, give me something to write with now feeling at the weirdest times. It comes from a place of happiness rather than anger or angst.
    Eat the carbs. I eat an apple, banana and sweet potatoe/squash/turnip etc. every day. The amount of food I eat is ridiculous. If I let myself slip into old calorie/fat counting habits I would probably freak out.
  19. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from kb0426 in CRANKY   
    Eating a cookie will not fix any of these problems.
  20. Like
    ScoutFinch reacted to ginsinnot in I Believe, and Now Is the Time   
    My before:
    Life was just sort of okay, maybe a little bleh. I felt like I couldn't really complain, but kept feeling something was missing. I had my “health†after all.
    I got really, suddenly, very sick in 2003. I had just graduated from college, was working in a research lab at a university, and was getting ready to start a PhD program. I woke up one day feeling as if an elephant was sitting on my chest, and through the day, my heart would just start racing for no reason. I ended up being admitted for almost a week due to a pulmonary embolism and a blood clot in my leg. Instead of getting better, I got sicker. I lost like 15 pounds in a few short weeks. Everything made me sick. I had no energy, just taking a shower made me feel like I was 80. I had horrible joint pains that would wake me in the night. My stomach felt like someone was reaching in and just squeezing. It took just a few months (though they did not feel short, and racked up 20+ emergency room visits) to be diagnosed with Crohn's Disease. The next 4 years were pretty rough, regular admits to the hospital, liquid only for months to rest my intestines, medications with side effects that were very real and very scary, and a total redefinition of my life. A trip to the grocery store became my big outing for a week. I was “disabled†and Social Security. And when you're in your 20s, that's not a good thing at all.
    But then, I started to feel a little better. I have not been admitted for a few years now. I was able to start working, just a sedentary desk job to ease back into the work force. Not exactly the job I had dreamed of and worked towards through school and college. I take one immune suppresser these days, not 48 pills of 5 different medications like I have in the past. I started to eat more and more foods as time went by.
    But I didn't feel good, not as good as I knew I could feel. I just wasn't deathly sick. So, I started searching, and wondering. I wanted to feel great, to be the healthiest person I could be even with a disease they don't know how to cure. I wanted to be happy and full of energy. I wanted to start my day ready to go, not wondering when I could take a nap. I wanted to not be irritable and almost anxious feeling. And I always wondered, why isn't food a part of what we talk about when I see my specialists? When I was really sick, it took the GI specialist almost a year before he suggested cutting out dairy as many people with Crohn's become lactose intolerant!?!
    Besides wanting to feel better, I wanted to be healthy. The medications I have taken to treat my Crohns can cause cancer (not to mention the 20+ cat-scans). That's not something I want. My dad died of a brain stem cancer when he was only 42. Two years ago I cared for my mother in my home while pancreatic cancer killed her. I have a sister that had ovarian and cervical cancer before age 45. I take cancer risks very seriously.
    This Is How I found Whole30:
    I stumbled on the paleo diet. The science geek in me that longed for that PhD in Molecular Biology fell flat out in love with Robb Wolf's podcasts. And I can't resist snark (and he's a little snarky). I started listening, in order, to podcasts from 2 years ago. I bought his book and started moving towards a Paleo way of eating and sleeping. And one day, he had Melissa and Dallas from the Whole9 on. So I checked them out online. And I ran out that night and bought ISWF. I read that in about 2 days. And then I read it again. And thought “yeah, why not today?†So I started working on my sister and may have forced her to read it. I'd already been cooking more Paleo for my husband. I told him he was welcome to join in, as all the food in the house was going to be Whole30 compliant. And I started on September 19th.
    Now that I've finished my Whole30:
    I could cry. This didn't just change my life, it's blown my mind.
    I've been so sick and so tired before. I thought just the absence of horrible pain was maybe going to be what I settled for. That I was going to settle for a less than dreamy job because maybe I wasn't healthy enough to go for more.
    I love reasons, not rules. I have loved science and experimentation since I was old enough to read. I want proof. And now I AM THE PROOF.
    I feel so good. My sleep (I need 9 hours and I refuse to feel bad about that) is restful. My energy is even and high. I wake up excited for the day, even just regular old workdays. Even when I'm tired, it's not a bone-numbing cranky fatigue. It's just simply tired. My mood, well, I didn't think I had mood issues before. But I must have, because I feel awesome now. I'm happy and calm and just great. When people ask me how I'm doing, I'm working on saying the words “fabulousâ€, “great†and “wonderfulâ€. I'm not good, I'm better than that and I want to share that. I eat. A lot. And I love it. I love eating fat and meats and vegetables. I feel satisfied. And I can tell I'm healthier. Joint pains I've dealt with for years are gone. My skin is just nicer. I feel confident this way of eating and sleeping and caring for my body is a way to battle cancer, that I'm arming my genes in the best way I can.
    My body just feels good, like every cell in my body is rejoicing in some serious sunshine and rainbows.
    I don't know how much weight I lost because this journey moved me to banish the scale (it's in the basement, and likely on its way to the landfill instead of being donated). I know that my clothes fit better. I know that I feel like dancing. And running. And lifting some heavy stuff.
    What's next? Well, we're going to keep eating like this. I'm going to follow the re-introduction plan to check out dairy. But I don't miss any grains. Maybe someday I'll be tempted, but I'll wait for that day. I'm never going to drink pop again (I had an unhealthy relationship with a certain diet soda). I will also follow the plan to check out some legumes. And honestly, I want the solid data from doing a re-introduction.
    With my husband's support, I'm looking at a graduate program. But instead of molecular biology in a pure research lab, I'm going to pursue a degree in food science and nutrition. Because, I BELIEVE, It Starts With Food.
    Thank you, to everyone on the forum for their support. To my sister Sarah for sharing the cooking and the cleaning. To my husband for coming along for the ride.To Dallas and Melissa for sharing with all of us.
  21. Like
    ScoutFinch reacted to MelliebuStacey in Scarred to go off plan & dealing w/guilt   
    First of all, I love this post. I really needed to read a lot of this today
    It is scary to come off a W30, and there will be slip-ups, victories, and days where you're not sure what the heck to do!
    My personal credo has come to be simple: how am I going to feel (physically, mentally, emotionally) after I put this in my mouth?
    Don't get discouraged--I have gained more weight than am proud of following three months of sheer bad eating (I won't make excuses, I was going through a sh!^^y time and I made terrible food choices); however, I'm 3 weeks back into riding my bicycle with my helment on (the helmet being my W9 guiding principles and a whole lotta willpower), and I feel better than I ever have. I have to remember where I'm coming from--I've been on both sides of the disordered eating spectrum; from being a compulsive overeater and weighing close to 200 pounds (I'm 5 feet tall mind you), to being a severe anorexic and weighing in just over 70 pounds before being hospitalized. Only recently (within the past 18 months) have I began to have a healthy relationship with food and exercise, and it's most certainly a marathon, not a sprint.
    Be proud of your gains, and let the parts of your past that you wish not to re-live ultimately be your guiding light, not a source of guilt or regret.
  22. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from SpinSpin in Too thin-can I continue with this?   
    And despite all this excellent advice, 102 pounds for someone who is eating is a problem you likely need to see your doctor about. That's a serious health risk.
  23. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from MelliebuStacey in Scarred to go off plan & dealing w/guilt   
    This is just a great thread. For me, good-quality unsweetened cream I whip with my little rotary egg beater over strawberries tastes spectacular. A Green and Black's milk chocolate bar was awful, and it used to be one of my favorite treats ever. Sweet potato chips are not worth the paper they are printed on (from?). A glass of wine last week was fine, last night was hideous (and this morning), so that has to be a very, very every-once-in-a-while thing. A mouthful of carrot cake (seriously, a mouthful) and an hour later I had fibro symptoms worse than right before I stopped eating wheat before Thanksgiving.
    But, it is still kind of scary to go out there and do it. But I am agreeing with everyone here that the more you allow yourself to eat what you choose for the good reasons you do, the less all that garbagy, "I'm cheating/transgressing (I was so sad to see that word on a post the other day)/going off diet" thinking will get you. I'm pretty sure.
    Thanks for starting this! Really helped me today.
  24. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from 1Maryann in Welcome Baby Atticus   
    Best name ever! Congratulations, and welcome to one of the most wonderful times of your life. Blessings on you all.
  25. Like
    ScoutFinch got a reaction from Emily in Vegetarian raised- turned meat eater!   
    A great book written by someone with a similar experience as you is Real Food by Nina Planck.
    Roasted whole chicken is fantastic. Some of the meat menus in Well Fed might be to your taste if you decide to start eating red meat, especially the cinnamon beef stew (I am a bit older than you, and these days find that chicken doesn't supply as much feeling of healthfulness as does red meat, but see what you think), but she also has the brining method for skinless boneless chicken breasts that you might try right away. Fatty fish is always good--good quality salmon and trout especially. Tuna salad with homemade mayo and chopped celery is one of my three go-to meals and is great in a pinch if you like canned tuna.