Pea

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  1. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Plantas in Plan a Whole30 dream vacation   
    I came close to having my dream vacation for the past two years, in October. My place of utter and deep peace is at the ocean---almost any place at the sea. I grew up spending summers at the Jersey shore when I was a kid, with mom and grandparents, and my dad coming in on the train every weekend from work. I remember those days as long, long, long and utterly relaxing. I could entertain myself for a full day on the beach, finding shells, walking the breaker rocks, sandcastles, naps in the sun, refreshing dips in the salty sea, riding the little white waves in to the shore. 
     
    So the past two Octobers my husband and I have spent 10 days in a place literally on the ocean at a spot in Marathon, Florida in the Florida Keys. We open all the windows to hear the ocean at night through the screens, a sound that is to me one of Earth's lullabyes to humans. We have stayed in a place with a full kitchen, and I make breakfast at home every morning: eggs with salsa and avocado, good Cuban coffee and we eat it on the balcony overlooking the ocean. My husband is getting going in the morning, so I often do a post-breakfast beach walk, or go swim in the pool, or take a 30 min. bike ride on my rented bike. Then my husband and I get up and go exploring----we tour an historical place, or a nature walk, or go browse in a gallery. We usually eat lunch and dinner out----and this is what I love about being on a coast----I eat fish for one or both of those meals! And the fish is so fresh! My typical meal in most restaurants in Marathon is fish grilled in butter with a salad and vegetables, and the fish is SO GOOD! In a Cuban restaurant I will treat myself to yucca in garlic sauce, or plantanos or tostones (fried plaintains) or sometimes maduros (sweet, ripe fried plantain), asking that the starchy food is grilled in butter. 
     
    Usually my husband and I both swim in the pool a second time after lunch, doing laps. Then we read, listen to the ocean, nap before going out again for dinner. We end the day with some Cuban coffee, unsweetened. Now in the interests of honesty, I must say these real life vacations included alcohol pretty much every night with dinner. We don't drink a lot, but I usually had a glass of wine, so these memories of not those of whole30 vacations. But minus the alcohol, I'd choose this same vacation at beautiful, slow-paced oceansides all around the world---especially the Mediterranean, where I've never been. The coastal towns of Italy and Sicily, Greece.....ahhhhhhhhhhhhh. To me that is heaven.
     
    Pea
  2. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Real Food Y'all in Sustaining a real food lifestyle living with your non-real food spouse   
    As far the marriage goes, it helps to focus on the positive! Like I cherish the fact that my hubby thinks it's of course necessary and wonderful for me to eat an anti-cancer diet, rather than me focusing on what HE should eat. I focus on that he never complains that I buy expensive grassfed, organic local meat, and ignore that he buys Bubba burgers and deep fried frozen crappy crap for himself. 
     
    We're in our sixties, and I am certainly not going to change him now. He has to change himself. That's always been true, it's just it's easier to accept now that we've grown older.
     
    Good luck on your journey!
  3. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Emma in 100 lbs   
    I've also a lot of ups and downs---in my life as well as in my weight, early 100 lbs. between my adult lifetime high and low (140 lbs. at age 52, 239 lbs. at age 48). Currently I weigh about 190 lbs., and I never gained back all the weight. I write this to you to let you know you aren't alone on this journey!
     
    I wish you all the success in the world, congratulations on taking care of yourself. I lift a glass of mineral water to you and say "To life!"
     
    Susie
  4. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Stegner in Calling all over 50 folks   
    Glad to see this thread, I just left a suggestion on the forum for a "over 50" official board. (Or whatever you call the identified sections!)
     
    I just started my third whole30 this week, so my focus is on finishing strong, not reintroduction quite yet. I just wanted to say hi because I'm going to be 61 in July and wanted to find my peers! So thanks for bumping up this thread, and I hope to get to know ya'll.
     
    Pea
  5. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Emma in 100 lbs   
    You hit the nail on the head, judip. I have a friend joining me for this whole 30 and I reminded her (and me) that we need to remember that this isn't 30 days of deprivation, it's 30 days of deeply nourishing self-care and putting ourselves first.
     
    I'm a caregiver (disabled adult child, aging parents) and it wasn't until my cancer diagnosis just before Thanksgiving last year that it really hit home for me, that I MUST TAKE CARE OF MYSELF!
     
    If beating ourselves up were effective in terms of weight loss, none of us would ever have a problem. 
     
    Hugs,
    Susie
  6. Like
    Pea got a reaction from gemininurse in Whole30 on a budget   
    Here's some budget friendly suggestions:
     
    1. Buy frozen vegetables at WalMart or Aldo's. WalMart now has Wild Oats and may even organic veggies. Let's say you eat veggies with lunch and dinner and you go through 2 bags/day. Each bag will cost approximately $1.70. (I did the research). So that's $23.80 a week. Sometimes things like string beans are on sale in the market for 99 cents/lb. in which case you can save some money on fresh veggies. Buy onions for about $3.00 for enough for a week, and carrots, another $3 for a bag. Total veg. cost: $29.80.
     
    2. You can buy a large, pastured, organic chicken for $22. Boil the chicken in water until falling-off-the bone tender. Shred the chicken and set aside, Cut up an onion and some carrots, simmer nice and slow for lovely chicken soup. Throw in a bag of your frozen greens for extra nutrition. Add some chicken to each bowl, have soup for dinner, save the bones. Soup: 1 meal. Next, use the cooked chicken in a stirfry wth your onions, carrots, and frozen greens. Meal #2. Finally, use the bones and all the veggie scraps you have (onions skins, carrot tops) and make another batch of broth. 
     
    3. If the 3 of  you eat 6 eggs/day for brekkie, buying organic Omega 3 eggs from supermarket will cost you about $10.50. 
     
    4. Buy ground beef ($3.50/lb. in my market in upstate NY) about 2 pounds, for meatballs and ground meat chili. $7.
     
    5. Buy a bone-in pork butt 4 lbs. for $1.50/lb. and make pulled pork. Save the bone and add it to chicken bones for richer broth: $6
     
    Total for all this: $75.30. You can save more if you don't buy the organic chicken, and you can get the frozen veggies down to $1.08/bag if you don't buy organic. 
     
    It's lean for sure, but using every scrap (like bones and veggies scraps for broth) is key!
     
    Good luck on your whole30 journey.
     
    Pea
  7. Like
    Pea reacted to Pea in Join A 2016 Whole9 Challenge!   
    Wow, what an awesome challenge! Is it okay to join the party now? I'm on Day 9 of my third whole30 and I deeply appreciate the understanding that a good life is more than what's on one's plate.
     
    Pea
  8. Like
    Pea reacted to Pea in Join A 2016 Whole9 Challenge!   
    Wow, what an awesome challenge! Is it okay to join the party now? I'm on Day 9 of my third whole30 and I deeply appreciate the understanding that a good life is more than what's on one's plate.
     
    Pea
  9. Like
    Pea reacted to Pea in Join A 2016 Whole9 Challenge!   
    Wow, what an awesome challenge! Is it okay to join the party now? I'm on Day 9 of my third whole30 and I deeply appreciate the understanding that a good life is more than what's on one's plate.
     
    Pea
  10. Like
    Pea reacted to Emma in Susie in her Sixties   
    Congrats on ignoring the scale and all that it does.  I've got a touch of the IFF today as well.  I'd had big hopes that I'd start Whole30 and miraculously slim down.  Ha.  I know that's not the case, but the last few days I've been bloated and then I assess my body and bleh!  Of course, I'm not exercising at all and I know I need to add that in.  I can envision myself feeling healthier and active, but it's also a long way off.  Small steps.
     
    I'm absolutely horrible around the sugars and when you write about your reaction to them, it really seems like you're talking about me.  I know I can eat paleo baked goods (not during Whole30) and they don't trigger the out of control eating that regular baked goods do.  Or at least, they allow me to still be in control.  Crazy powerful things foods are.  Last night I was reading about bitters and how they help curb sugar cravings.  I'm curious about them and wonder how they'd sit in my body.  Overall, I'm so much happier on Whole30 because I don't think about foods and grazing and picking up junk food from the store that I have to keep hidden from my kids.
     
    Best wishes for a oomph filled day tomorrow!
  11. Like
    Pea reacted to Pea in Join A 2016 Whole9 Challenge!   
    Wow, what an awesome challenge! Is it okay to join the party now? I'm on Day 9 of my third whole30 and I deeply appreciate the understanding that a good life is more than what's on one's plate.
     
    Pea
  12. Like
    Pea got a reaction from LadyDi42 in New Forum Request   
    I would love to see a "specialty" forum for those over 50 or 60 years of age. Thank you! 
     
    Susie
  13. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Emma in Susie in her Sixties   
    Day Zero
     
    I'm coming out of a gluten, dairy, sugar, stress overload period, but no whining or crying aloud. Suffice it to say that I will be 61 years old in July. I have an autoimmune condition (ankylosing spondylitis) which affects my spine; I've had 5 major operations in the past 8 years, including one for thyroid cancer; and I LOVE life and I want to feel good and enjoy it. I *know* IT STARTS WITH FOOD. It doesn't end there, this yearning for the good life, but it starts there. 
     
    So here are my intentions for the 30 days:
     
    1. Follow the Whole30 rules.
    2. Watch the attitude: this is not deprivation, this is a gift I am giving myself. Set a nice table. Make a nice presentation of food.
    3. Passover is a challenge. There will be enough whole30 compliant foods to construct a compliant plate for the meals, but I am deciding ahead of time to do the following: 1 bite of gluten free matzoh for ritual purposes, and four sips (not cups) of wine at the two seders I will attend. I will not count this as a failure. 
    4. No going from sedentary to 60 miles an hour with exercise (even if I could, which I can't). My goal: 45 minutes of movement at day----walking, swimming, easy cycling. That's it. Nothing more. When I drop some of my excess weight and begin to feel better, I can consider something else. That's it for now. And it doesn't have to be all at once---I have a 20  minute loop around my neighborhood, I can do that 2 or 3 times in a day and call it a constitutional----or as the Italians say, "passeggiata." 
     
    TROUBLESHOOTING
    My biggest problem is eating all evening. I need some stress reduction strategies other than peanut butter and whipped cream sandwiches. So here it is: in the evening, if I am home, I will make some chamomile and lavender tea; take a warm bath with epsom salts, grab a book and go to bed early and read. If I feel an urge, I will come here to my log and write about it without acting on it. I will also experiment with a slow evening walk right after dinner, to interrupt the habit-switch of beginning to fight with myself about whether or not to eat when not hungry. 
     
    Today is farmer's market day so I am off to buy some lovely veggies, and also some high quality fish and meats. I will be ready for official day one tomorrow! 
     
     
     
    Susie at Sixty
  14. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Emma in Susie in her Sixties   
    So, day 7 eating done for the day.
     
    Meal one was 2 eggs and sauerkraut. 
    Meal two was lamb liver and swiss chard with 1/4 avocado.
    I got hungry around 3pm and ate 1/2 apple with handful of walnuts
    Meal three was Korean Short Ribs (from the Nom Nom Paleo cookbook) and spinach with pancetta and garlic. Some melon for dessert right after the meal. 
     
    Feeling pretty good! Post whole 30, the biggest lesson is just how rare sugar indulgences need to be for me. If my rate of weight loss is slow, that's ok. If I am 10 pounds lighter at the end of a year, it's good. I think that could happen just by keeping sugar and bread out of my life.
     
    Pea
  15. Like
    Pea reacted to Emma in Susie in her Sixties   
    Oh Susie, I was laughing as I read and wanting to just interrupt your words and say, "ME TOOOO!"
     
    I'm also so amazed at how fast the "raging gotta-eats" and the grazing goes away.  I really feel like my body and brain is constantly questing for food when I eat the other foods and I don't really know if there is A trigger or if it's just a little of everything.  And, I too, wonder why the heck I don't eat this way normally and maintain it when I feel better, feel in control, feel healthier.....aye aye aye....it's just not easy being human. 
     
    And you mentioned Dance Moms.  Oh, what an absolutely horrible show I too am drawn to it.  It's so fascinating.  That, and Toddlers in Tiaras.  Thankfully, we don't have a TV so I only get to watch when I'm in hotels on the exact right night and now I have kids that travel with me most times so even if it is on, I won't watch it with them.  But oh, I would love to sit with another human and watch some of these shows together and discuss what exactly is going on!
     
    And then, Susie, I saw you ate arugula and sardines Really, how fantastic is it to run across another person that eats the same things.  I love arugula.  I love sardines. 
     
    So anyway - I'm saying hello and wishing you well on this journey.  It's a good one for us to be on.
  16. Like
    Pea got a reaction from madness in Sustaining a real food lifestyle living with your non-real food spouse   
    I first started eating Paleo around age 50, a decade ago. I was a dedicated athlete, long distance cyclist, Crossfit instructor!
     
    Then I got Lyme Disease but it took me years to get it diagnosed, and in that time, I had 2 spine operations (probably due to undiagnosed Lyme pain!) and a host of other ills. I gained a lot of weight and had other life stressors (like an autistic adult child and another child with bipolar disorder). My eating discipline got lost in the shuffle. This is my third whole30 in the past few years and this time, it's for a real reset. Having been diagnosed with cancer this year, it's even more critical that I control what I can in my life, and eating well is one of those things.
     
    This whole30, the magic was almost instantaneous. My hunger becomes physiologic instead of emotional. I stop thinking about food all day long. My bloat diminishes.....all the good stuff.
     
    Makes you wonder what on earth would make me become careless when caring feels so good?
     
    Answer: Caregiver PUT YOURSELF FIRST!
  17. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Stegner in Calling all over 50 folks   
    Glad to see this thread, I just left a suggestion on the forum for a "over 50" official board. (Or whatever you call the identified sections!)
     
    I just started my third whole30 this week, so my focus is on finishing strong, not reintroduction quite yet. I just wanted to say hi because I'm going to be 61 in July and wanted to find my peers! So thanks for bumping up this thread, and I hope to get to know ya'll.
     
    Pea
  18. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Emma in Susie in her Sixties   
    Day Zero
     
    I'm coming out of a gluten, dairy, sugar, stress overload period, but no whining or crying aloud. Suffice it to say that I will be 61 years old in July. I have an autoimmune condition (ankylosing spondylitis) which affects my spine; I've had 5 major operations in the past 8 years, including one for thyroid cancer; and I LOVE life and I want to feel good and enjoy it. I *know* IT STARTS WITH FOOD. It doesn't end there, this yearning for the good life, but it starts there. 
     
    So here are my intentions for the 30 days:
     
    1. Follow the Whole30 rules.
    2. Watch the attitude: this is not deprivation, this is a gift I am giving myself. Set a nice table. Make a nice presentation of food.
    3. Passover is a challenge. There will be enough whole30 compliant foods to construct a compliant plate for the meals, but I am deciding ahead of time to do the following: 1 bite of gluten free matzoh for ritual purposes, and four sips (not cups) of wine at the two seders I will attend. I will not count this as a failure. 
    4. No going from sedentary to 60 miles an hour with exercise (even if I could, which I can't). My goal: 45 minutes of movement at day----walking, swimming, easy cycling. That's it. Nothing more. When I drop some of my excess weight and begin to feel better, I can consider something else. That's it for now. And it doesn't have to be all at once---I have a 20  minute loop around my neighborhood, I can do that 2 or 3 times in a day and call it a constitutional----or as the Italians say, "passeggiata." 
     
    TROUBLESHOOTING
    My biggest problem is eating all evening. I need some stress reduction strategies other than peanut butter and whipped cream sandwiches. So here it is: in the evening, if I am home, I will make some chamomile and lavender tea; take a warm bath with epsom salts, grab a book and go to bed early and read. If I feel an urge, I will come here to my log and write about it without acting on it. I will also experiment with a slow evening walk right after dinner, to interrupt the habit-switch of beginning to fight with myself about whether or not to eat when not hungry. 
     
    Today is farmer's market day so I am off to buy some lovely veggies, and also some high quality fish and meats. I will be ready for official day one tomorrow! 
     
     
     
    Susie at Sixty
  19. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Emma in 100 lbs   
    You hit the nail on the head, judip. I have a friend joining me for this whole 30 and I reminded her (and me) that we need to remember that this isn't 30 days of deprivation, it's 30 days of deeply nourishing self-care and putting ourselves first.
     
    I'm a caregiver (disabled adult child, aging parents) and it wasn't until my cancer diagnosis just before Thanksgiving last year that it really hit home for me, that I MUST TAKE CARE OF MYSELF!
     
    If beating ourselves up were effective in terms of weight loss, none of us would ever have a problem. 
     
    Hugs,
    Susie
  20. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Emma in 100 lbs   
    I've also a lot of ups and downs---in my life as well as in my weight, early 100 lbs. between my adult lifetime high and low (140 lbs. at age 52, 239 lbs. at age 48). Currently I weigh about 190 lbs., and I never gained back all the weight. I write this to you to let you know you aren't alone on this journey!
     
    I wish you all the success in the world, congratulations on taking care of yourself. I lift a glass of mineral water to you and say "To life!"
     
    Susie
  21. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Emma in 4/11 - Day One, Spiritual Journey   
    Neal, I appreciate your relationship to your whole30. Stress had moved me into that same all-evening-long eating pattern. What I find (having done this before) that almost immediately I feel the switch inside from emotion-driven appetite to physiologic hunger. 
     
    I also have been practicing mindfulness meditation for years now and I when I started this, I said to myself, "Mindful eating will be the focus of your practice for 30 days." 
     
    So I am taking this as an opportunity to listen deeply (without judgement) to my body, and to pay attention to my food when I eat. 
     
    I am very interested in hearing from you as you take each step on the way. Good luck!
     
    Pea
  22. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Alix B. in Sustaining a real food lifestyle living with your non-real food spouse   
    My hubby is a SAD addict, not to mention 67 years old, a type II diabetic, and 100 lbs. overweight. It was harder when our two sons lived home with us and I was responsible for family meals. 
     
    Now that we live alone together, it's easier. My husband eats the same thing every.single.day for breaktfast: large, commercial bagel, cream cheese, lox (smoked salmon from farmed Atlantic fish). 
     
    For lunch, no matter WHAT wonderful whole30 leftovers are in the fridge, he buys his lunch: a submarine sandwich, chinese food, pizza. JUNK! 
     
    He nibbles at my beautiful real food meals at dinner, then makes himself foods to snack on all evening, including things like hot dogs on buns, frozen Hungry Man dinners, etc. He buys all his own junk food, as I will not buy that stuff.
     
    I shop for and cook all my own meals. I make enough for both of us, and he nibbles at my stuff for form's sake. But mostly he lives on his his junk. 
     
    He doesn't try to change me and I don't try to change him. It isn't ideal, and sometimes I get lonely and sometimes I wish he would appreciate the beauty of a meal that's full of colorful veggies and beautiful meat.
     
    I've learned there are a few things we can share: he likes meat loaf and mashed potatoes, which I can build a whole30 meal upon. I've discovered that mashed cauliflower is a great binder instead of bread crumbs! He also likes meatballs so I can serve that with zucchini noodles. 
     
    I would call the state of our mealtimes a negotiated peace...
     
    Pea
  23. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Alix B. in Sustaining a real food lifestyle living with your non-real food spouse   
    My hubby is a SAD addict, not to mention 67 years old, a type II diabetic, and 100 lbs. overweight. It was harder when our two sons lived home with us and I was responsible for family meals. 
     
    Now that we live alone together, it's easier. My husband eats the same thing every.single.day for breaktfast: large, commercial bagel, cream cheese, lox (smoked salmon from farmed Atlantic fish). 
     
    For lunch, no matter WHAT wonderful whole30 leftovers are in the fridge, he buys his lunch: a submarine sandwich, chinese food, pizza. JUNK! 
     
    He nibbles at my beautiful real food meals at dinner, then makes himself foods to snack on all evening, including things like hot dogs on buns, frozen Hungry Man dinners, etc. He buys all his own junk food, as I will not buy that stuff.
     
    I shop for and cook all my own meals. I make enough for both of us, and he nibbles at my stuff for form's sake. But mostly he lives on his his junk. 
     
    He doesn't try to change me and I don't try to change him. It isn't ideal, and sometimes I get lonely and sometimes I wish he would appreciate the beauty of a meal that's full of colorful veggies and beautiful meat.
     
    I've learned there are a few things we can share: he likes meat loaf and mashed potatoes, which I can build a whole30 meal upon. I've discovered that mashed cauliflower is a great binder instead of bread crumbs! He also likes meatballs so I can serve that with zucchini noodles. 
     
    I would call the state of our mealtimes a negotiated peace...
     
    Pea
  24. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Real Food Y'all in Sustaining a real food lifestyle living with your non-real food spouse   
    As far the marriage goes, it helps to focus on the positive! Like I cherish the fact that my hubby thinks it's of course necessary and wonderful for me to eat an anti-cancer diet, rather than me focusing on what HE should eat. I focus on that he never complains that I buy expensive grassfed, organic local meat, and ignore that he buys Bubba burgers and deep fried frozen crappy crap for himself. 
     
    We're in our sixties, and I am certainly not going to change him now. He has to change himself. That's always been true, it's just it's easier to accept now that we've grown older.
     
    Good luck on your journey!
  25. Like
    Pea got a reaction from Real Food Y'all in Sustaining a real food lifestyle living with your non-real food spouse   
    As far the marriage goes, it helps to focus on the positive! Like I cherish the fact that my hubby thinks it's of course necessary and wonderful for me to eat an anti-cancer diet, rather than me focusing on what HE should eat. I focus on that he never complains that I buy expensive grassfed, organic local meat, and ignore that he buys Bubba burgers and deep fried frozen crappy crap for himself. 
     
    We're in our sixties, and I am certainly not going to change him now. He has to change himself. That's always been true, it's just it's easier to accept now that we've grown older.
     
    Good luck on your journey!