1Maryann

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  1. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from edgymama in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    When it's 6:30 am on a weekday, and you have a turkey in the oven, just because.
  2. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from JMGM in Taco beef   
    I've been making this, plus an egg for binding, into a taco meatloaf. Makes it easier to take for lunch, just zap the slices and top with some salsa. Yum!
  3. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from ultrarunnergirl in Wine: an update and some realizations   
    I just found this thread.  Don't know how I've missed it for so long. 
     
    I started a W100 on 1/1/13 with a bunch of other women on here.  The one thing that almost prevented me from doing it was that I had never gone 100 days without a drink since I was probably 16.  I wasn't sure I could do it, and at times it was rough.  But by the end of the 100 days, I felt so much better without it that I have never added it back.
     
    The key was to learn new coping skills.  As I've posted on some other threads, coming home, opening a bottle of wine, and letting the stress of the day fall away were part of the ritual that made it attractive.  During my W100, that was when I missed it most.  So I analyzed why.  What was different?  When I came home from work and wasn't drinking, I immediately started picking up the house, or folding laundry, or making dinner.  I wasn't missing the alcohol, per se, I was missing the permission it gave me to just sit and not do anything for a while.  So I started making a cup of tea, or a sparkling water, and just sitting for a few minutes while the 'stressed, Work Maryann' ebbed away and the 'peaceful, Home Maryann' took her place.  Allowing myself the decompression and transition time was every bit as important as the drink, except I didn't realize it at the time.
     
    Now, fourteen months later, my moods, my sleep, my energy levels are so much improved that I can't imagine letting wine back in.  But for those still working through their relationships with alcohol, your milage may vary.  This is the solution that works for me, but we all have to learn to ride our own bikes.
  4. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from TryingOver in Beef broth with "organic caramel color" or "organic natural flavor"   
    Congratulations.  Your eyes have been opened.  There is sugar in almost everything.  Look at your box of table salt.  I can almost guarantee there's sugar in your salt, too.  It keeps it free-flowing.  It isn't until you try eating this way that you become aware of how insidious the sugar problem is in this country.  And soy is almost as bad.  It is in most vitamins, teas, all kinds of places you would never imagine.  If nothing else, this journey has been an education for me. 
  5. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from edgymama in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    ...in a discussion of what you had for breakfast, you mention having ground beef with sauteed cabbage, or a beef stew omelet, and are genuinely surprised at the reaction of your friends.
  6. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from doedoechachacha in Binging since completing whole30   
    Jodea, many of us are not fixed in 30 days. It's an ongoing project. Look at the growth you've had this time, in recognizing you were using fruit to feed the dragon. I think most of us will do multiple Whole30s in our lives, and learn a little more about ourselves each time. We didn't get this way overnight, and we won't correct our issues overnight.
  7. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from doedoechachacha in Binging since completing whole30   
    I did this three different times. I did great on my Whole30, and derailed shortly after finishing. I was treating it like any other 'diet' that you jump on for results, then jump off when you're 'done'. I needed far more than 30 days to really develop some new habits and coping mechanisms.
    I was in the Whole100 group that started the first of the year. Of the 40 or so who started, only 7 of us made it to the end. Most of those who did were like me, with addictive personalities who have a lot of trouble with trigger foods. While a Whole100 is not recommended for most people, because you eventually need to learn how to ride your own bike, for some of us with eating disorders or unhealthy addictions to wheat, sugar, alcohol, etc. it can be very beneficial. It was somehow long enough to force me to learn new ways of cooking, eating, dealing with stress, etc. and to develop tastes for new favorites that are healthy for me.
    Now that it is over, I have very little desire to add back any of the things I know I have trouble with. I feel too good to screw it up at this point. The first three times, I spent the last few days planning what 'forbidden' food to eat first. This time, I am looking at my trigger foods and deciding the momentary pleasure they will give me is not worth the long-term effects of derailing myself once again. Will I never eat another slice of pizza? Who knows? But for right now, I am not taking the first bite, because I can easily wind up eating it for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, no matter how bad it makes me feel.
    Quitting smoking was the same for me. I failed many times. I eventually had to come to grips with the fact that I cannot have that first drag. Even now, 12 years later, I know in my heart that the first drag would not be the last one. Some dragons are better left sleeping.
  8. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from edgymama in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    When it's 6:30 am on a weekday, and you have a turkey in the oven, just because.
  9. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from LindaC in Giving up wine for W30   
    I had an epiphany this week and I wanted to share. And when it hit me, it was a 'duh' moment!
    Years ago, when I finally quit smoking for the final time, I found that even months later I would be hit with a sudden craving for a cigarette. It was bizarre, because for all intents and purposes I was long past the stage of either physical or psychological dependence. So I started analyzing who I was with, what I was doing, where Iwas, and trying to figure out why the cravings would hit at that moment.
    The answer was that I was usually alone and doing something fairly strenuous like mopping floors or yard work. The why turned out to be simple. Smokers take breaks. People just stop what they are doing, say "I need a cigarette" and go somewhere to smoke it. It turned out I didn't really want the cigarette, I wanted to give myself permission to sit down for five minutes. A lot of times we just run ourselves too hard for too long. Once I gave myself permission to take a break without guilt, without feeling like I was lazy, without beating myself up over how much was still to be done, the cravings went away.
    Wine has always been my refuge after a stressful day. I would come and pour a glass to 'decompress' after my stressful day. Instead of jumping right into cooking dinner, finishing the breakfast dishes, folding laundry, or whatever, I would pour a drink and just 'chill' for half an hour. Now, if I am stressed, I make a cup of herbal tea and sit with it. I haven't missed the wine at all. Because it wasn't the wine I wanted, it was the permission to sit down and not feel like I had to get moving on dinner and chores.
    Not sure this will make sense to anyone else, but for me it's more about cutting myself some slack than it is about the substance.
  10. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from ultrarunnergirl in Wine: an update and some realizations   
    I just found this thread.  Don't know how I've missed it for so long. 
     
    I started a W100 on 1/1/13 with a bunch of other women on here.  The one thing that almost prevented me from doing it was that I had never gone 100 days without a drink since I was probably 16.  I wasn't sure I could do it, and at times it was rough.  But by the end of the 100 days, I felt so much better without it that I have never added it back.
     
    The key was to learn new coping skills.  As I've posted on some other threads, coming home, opening a bottle of wine, and letting the stress of the day fall away were part of the ritual that made it attractive.  During my W100, that was when I missed it most.  So I analyzed why.  What was different?  When I came home from work and wasn't drinking, I immediately started picking up the house, or folding laundry, or making dinner.  I wasn't missing the alcohol, per se, I was missing the permission it gave me to just sit and not do anything for a while.  So I started making a cup of tea, or a sparkling water, and just sitting for a few minutes while the 'stressed, Work Maryann' ebbed away and the 'peaceful, Home Maryann' took her place.  Allowing myself the decompression and transition time was every bit as important as the drink, except I didn't realize it at the time.
     
    Now, fourteen months later, my moods, my sleep, my energy levels are so much improved that I can't imagine letting wine back in.  But for those still working through their relationships with alcohol, your milage may vary.  This is the solution that works for me, but we all have to learn to ride our own bikes.
  11. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from ultrarunnergirl in Wine: an update and some realizations   
    I just found this thread.  Don't know how I've missed it for so long. 
     
    I started a W100 on 1/1/13 with a bunch of other women on here.  The one thing that almost prevented me from doing it was that I had never gone 100 days without a drink since I was probably 16.  I wasn't sure I could do it, and at times it was rough.  But by the end of the 100 days, I felt so much better without it that I have never added it back.
     
    The key was to learn new coping skills.  As I've posted on some other threads, coming home, opening a bottle of wine, and letting the stress of the day fall away were part of the ritual that made it attractive.  During my W100, that was when I missed it most.  So I analyzed why.  What was different?  When I came home from work and wasn't drinking, I immediately started picking up the house, or folding laundry, or making dinner.  I wasn't missing the alcohol, per se, I was missing the permission it gave me to just sit and not do anything for a while.  So I started making a cup of tea, or a sparkling water, and just sitting for a few minutes while the 'stressed, Work Maryann' ebbed away and the 'peaceful, Home Maryann' took her place.  Allowing myself the decompression and transition time was every bit as important as the drink, except I didn't realize it at the time.
     
    Now, fourteen months later, my moods, my sleep, my energy levels are so much improved that I can't imagine letting wine back in.  But for those still working through their relationships with alcohol, your milage may vary.  This is the solution that works for me, but we all have to learn to ride our own bikes.
  12. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from Nuthatch Rancher in Older women following Whole30   
    Greetings, ladies!  May I join you?  This sounds like my kind of crowd.  I'm 57, I love bookstores, and I'm convinced Shelley's latke recipes will be every bit as good as that eggplant curry recipe she shared on another thread.
     
    My hair is natural.  I started getting my first greys in my late teens, colored my hair for 25 years, then got sick and tired of doing it.  The older I got, the greyer I got, and the faster the roots showed up.  It became too much trouble.  I had no idea what my real color would be when I decided to stop.  I let the roots grow out an inch or so, then told the hairdresser to cut off everything that wasn't grey.
     
    I love avocado.  I just purchased a 3 year old tree from the organic store I patronize.  It cost me a good penny, but it should start producing this fall and will hopefully save me some money in the long run.  I eat a half or a whole one almost every day.  Those buggers ain't cheap!
     
    I had to laugh at the canned veg talk.  In our house it was frozen, not canned, but I was out on my own before I ever had a fresh vegetable.  I'm guessing our mothers were from the crossover generation--old enough that they knew what it was to spend hours preparing meals from scratch, and totally awed by the advent of convenience foods.  The Wonder bread came already baked and sliced, and the vegetables were already washed, trimmed, and cut up.  Just heat and eat! 
     
    Betty Crocker Answer Cakes!  Anyone remember those?  Everything you needed to make a cake, all in a convenient box--the cake mix, the frosting mix, even the little disposable cake pan.  You just added an egg and some water, and you were in business.  Made it really easy to have cake for dessert any time you wanted.  (Probably the beginning of our SAD diet)
     
    Anyway, pleased to meet you all.  Hope you don't mind if I pop in once in a while.
  13. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from edgymama in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    When it's 6:30 am on a weekday, and you have a turkey in the oven, just because.
  14. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from edgymama in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    How has this thread taken me so long to discover! I just read all seven pages and laughed several times per page.
  15. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from edgymama in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    ...in a discussion of what you had for breakfast, you mention having ground beef with sauteed cabbage, or a beef stew omelet, and are genuinely surprised at the reaction of your friends.
  16. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from SpinSpin in What's your favorite Whole30-compliant CURRY?   
    I use this recipe: http://everydaypaleo.com/thai-green-curry/
    You can use this as the template for red or green curry, and a variety of veggies. My rule is to put the 'hard' veggies in early, then add the 'soft' veggies later.
  17. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from ultrarunnergirl in Wine: an update and some realizations   
    I just found this thread.  Don't know how I've missed it for so long. 
     
    I started a W100 on 1/1/13 with a bunch of other women on here.  The one thing that almost prevented me from doing it was that I had never gone 100 days without a drink since I was probably 16.  I wasn't sure I could do it, and at times it was rough.  But by the end of the 100 days, I felt so much better without it that I have never added it back.
     
    The key was to learn new coping skills.  As I've posted on some other threads, coming home, opening a bottle of wine, and letting the stress of the day fall away were part of the ritual that made it attractive.  During my W100, that was when I missed it most.  So I analyzed why.  What was different?  When I came home from work and wasn't drinking, I immediately started picking up the house, or folding laundry, or making dinner.  I wasn't missing the alcohol, per se, I was missing the permission it gave me to just sit and not do anything for a while.  So I started making a cup of tea, or a sparkling water, and just sitting for a few minutes while the 'stressed, Work Maryann' ebbed away and the 'peaceful, Home Maryann' took her place.  Allowing myself the decompression and transition time was every bit as important as the drink, except I didn't realize it at the time.
     
    Now, fourteen months later, my moods, my sleep, my energy levels are so much improved that I can't imagine letting wine back in.  But for those still working through their relationships with alcohol, your milage may vary.  This is the solution that works for me, but we all have to learn to ride our own bikes.
  18. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from ultrarunnergirl in Wine: an update and some realizations   
    I just found this thread.  Don't know how I've missed it for so long. 
     
    I started a W100 on 1/1/13 with a bunch of other women on here.  The one thing that almost prevented me from doing it was that I had never gone 100 days without a drink since I was probably 16.  I wasn't sure I could do it, and at times it was rough.  But by the end of the 100 days, I felt so much better without it that I have never added it back.
     
    The key was to learn new coping skills.  As I've posted on some other threads, coming home, opening a bottle of wine, and letting the stress of the day fall away were part of the ritual that made it attractive.  During my W100, that was when I missed it most.  So I analyzed why.  What was different?  When I came home from work and wasn't drinking, I immediately started picking up the house, or folding laundry, or making dinner.  I wasn't missing the alcohol, per se, I was missing the permission it gave me to just sit and not do anything for a while.  So I started making a cup of tea, or a sparkling water, and just sitting for a few minutes while the 'stressed, Work Maryann' ebbed away and the 'peaceful, Home Maryann' took her place.  Allowing myself the decompression and transition time was every bit as important as the drink, except I didn't realize it at the time.
     
    Now, fourteen months later, my moods, my sleep, my energy levels are so much improved that I can't imagine letting wine back in.  But for those still working through their relationships with alcohol, your milage may vary.  This is the solution that works for me, but we all have to learn to ride our own bikes.
  19. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from hollylu in Anyone on Pinterest???   
    I set my whole Pinterest account up like a recipe file.  Each board is a separate category--poultry, pork, meat, sides, soups, etc.  Feel free to join me.
     
    http://www.pinterest.com/paleomaryann  
  20. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from SpinSpin in What's your favorite Whole30-compliant CURRY?   
    I use this recipe: http://everydaypaleo.com/thai-green-curry/
    You can use this as the template for red or green curry, and a variety of veggies. My rule is to put the 'hard' veggies in early, then add the 'soft' veggies later.
  21. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from tulipgirl6 in What is the Carb Curve?   
    I don't do much formal exercise.  I tend my yard and garden and lug heavy feed sacks at work.  Even without much exercise I have always eaten a half to a whole sweet potato a day, sometimes more.  Listen to your body.  For no apparent reason, some days you will want more and some you will want less.  We have conditioned ourselves to eat to a 'diet' with rigid guidelines.  Go with the flow.  If you aren't full until the next mealtime, eat a bit more.  If you are feeling stuffed, cut back.  I have always eaten on the high end of the spectrum of protein, fat, and starchy veggies and still have lost weight on every W30.  A lot of this is relearning how to listen to your body instead of the 'junk food devil' whispering in your ear.  Let us know how it goes.
  22. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from bridgid10 in Help, I can't find a sausage that doesn't have some sort of sugar in it!   
    I buy ground pork at Whole Foods and make my own using this recipe:  http://cupcakesomg.blogspot.com/2013/01/new-years-resolutions-are-stupid-paleo.html I make a batch every week to have with my sweet potato hash and eggs.
     
    Edited to add:  i don't make patties, I just saute it up in crumbles.  Much easier to mix with the hash.
  23. Like
    1Maryann reacted to A_Whole_New_Me in Really? This is where my line is drawn in the sand.   
    This thread is the only combative thread I've read on this forum & the only one where offensive language was used.  There's a very good reason the "r" word is no longer used in polite conversation, just like the "f" word (that rhymes with rag) and the "n" word are no longer used in polite conversation.  It's a simple matter of respect. I respect other people, and thus I strive to refrain from using language designed to offend.
     
    Have you read It Starts with Food yet?  That is intended to be the comprehensive resource for this diet, not the shopping list.  I would think it's pretty self-explanatory that one page shopping list is not intended to be the comprehensive resource.
  24. Like
    1Maryann got a reaction from Physibeth in Really? This is where my line is drawn in the sand.   
    I'm sorry you don't think the mods are treating you kindly enough. Please go back and read your original post.  I read it, and immediately thought "Who does this person think she is?"  You saw something on the list you didn't agree with, and instead of respectfully asking for clarification, you got all in-your-face, you-people-are-a-bunch-of-jerks, I'm-digging-in-my-heels-and-not-budging.  I'm glad to see you wanted to be talked to like a two year old, because that is how you came across.
     
    Your original post was highly combative.  On top of that, you used a put-down that NOBODY uses in polite conversation, nor should they.  And then when somebody very gently chided you on it, you got offended.  How many of us that read your initial post do you think you might have offended?
     
    You seem to have gotten off on the wrong foot here.  I'm sorry for that, there is a lot of valuable information and support on this site.  But we are not like most online forums.  I know there are a lot of places out there where people can't disagree without belittling or being argumentative.  We are not one of them.  Name calling, derogatory terms, temper tantrums and hissy fits are not well tolerated.
     
    Perhaps we can all start over?
  25. Like
    1Maryann reacted to missmary in Really? This is where my line is drawn in the sand.   
    You are offended? Robin is right to call out the use of "retarded." That's not ok. I'm not "offended" I'm offended. words matter. And honestly she called you out in the gentlest most sensitive way I can imagine doing so.
     
    This is a safe space where we respect each other. If you would like to join us in mutual respect on the forum, we would welcome you and do our best to help.
     
    FWIW I agree that it would be helpful to add a note on the shopping list to clarify that it is not comprehensive and pretty much all vegetables are permitted on the regular whole30 plan (just not "vegetables" which are actually grain, like corn, or "vegetables" which are actually legumes, like peas). You are not the first to be confused by that one.