LadyM

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  1. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from trailrunner70 in Pre-Menstrual and I want Chocolate.....   
    There's also evidence that women crave chocolate before their periods because it's high in magnesium and THAT's what our bodies actually need. I rarely crave chocolate now that I take a magnesium supplement. And I generally need to increase my dose significantly the week before my period.
  2. Thanks
    LadyM got a reaction from suzannes in Binge eating - how do I break this nasty cycle?   
    @foursimplewords get better! But why not continue W30? I've found it to be the most supportive thing I can do for my body when my immune system is under attack. Just a thought.
     
    @OP I struggled in the same ways during my first W30 (a W47 one year ago), so in my second (now on Day 54), I did what others here have suggested: I banned nuts and dried fruit unless as a small part of larger compliant recipe. The only dried fruit I keep in my house is raisins, for that purpose, and all the nuts are banished to the freezer. It's made a WORLD of difference to my success on this W30 and in eliminating the urge to binge. I also second the book Brain Over Binge that someone else suggested. Best of luck to you and keep searching. You're on the right path, and if you keep going, you'll find what works for you and you will not have to live this way. It starts with food and getting the proper nourishment, followed by impulse control and perhaps some psychological and spiritual attention. You'll get there!
  3. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from NatalieCatalie_ in Finished first Whole 30 but Weight Loss Is SLOOOOOOW   
    You've started a really wonderful conversation here that many of us needed to revisit! Thank you for that.
     
    I'd like to add that a six pound weight loss on W30 is more than likely a six pound fat loss. If you've done crash diets in the past and lost 6-10 pounds in a week, likely very little of that was fat and mostly water, perhaps even muscle mass. Remember that the scale doesn't tell us what, exactly, we've lost; and it certainly doesn't promise that whatever we've lost will stay off. However, with W30, you're setting yourself up for sustainable fat loss. Trust that over your past experiences with crash diets and whatever your monkey mind is telling you about the number on the scale.
     
     
    So very true. And, the marketing world wants you to believe you can get thin fast. However, it's much more invested in making sure that even if you lose weight fast you'll always get fat again so you keep coming back for more of their paid weight loss schemes that don't work. Seriously. They literally set us up to fail in order to maximize their profit. It's a vicious cycle orchestrated by greed. Let's not forget that. Ever.
     
    And keeping that in mind, we have to shift all of our expectations. We've been fed a pack of lies, and if we continue to believe effective weight loss looks like the yo-yo model (without the return back up), then we're complicit in the lies and destruction. Instead, let's explode those faulty expectations and dive into the new model of the W30 that puts our lives and health back into our own hands. Release the fear and embrace the revolution!
  4. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from Robin R. in Whole 30 + Weight Watchers   
    I second the idea of working to better understand what's happening in your body at this point. You say you feel bloated. Can you pinpoint particular foods that cause bloat? As someone mentioned, looking into FODMAPs might help. Playing with your portions might also help, while also staying within the template recommendations. I know for me, my tastebuds prefer to eat the high end of fats, but my body does better eating the low end of fats. I also needed to get real about how I was using certain compliant foods. Dried fruit and nut butters are as good as candy for me--they make me less, not more, healthy, because of how I tend to eat them.
     
    This is one of the things I love and find incredibly valuable about Whole30. It's not one size fits all, and once you start, there are so many ways to take a closer look at ourselves and our behavior. Foods are healthy--or not--not just physically but psychologically. Figuring that out, and how to work with it for myself, has been revolutionary.
     
    Taking the longview is paramount. I've been Whole30ing and pursuing a Whole9 life for three years now. My massage therapist says my body composition has completely changed for the better. I know myself so much better. Even when I off road or get off track, I know how to get back. I can love and accept myself and my less-than-healthy behaviors in a new way. I am, ultimately, less fat than when I started, and wearing a smaller size. I am, ultimately, hugely more healthy in every possible way than when I started. And I did not lose dramatic numbers on the scale.
     
    In my years of doing WW on and off I could never say any of that, even when at my lowest weight, which I only ever hovered around for a flash.
     
    Oh, and one other thing: I think when folks start W30 after years of dieting of various stripes, they have a tendency to go through a re-feed period. Our bodies are clamoring for real nutrition! So, even when we have weight to lose, it comes off slowly at first, and that's actually a good thing. As you ease in and the body grows accustomed to being properly nourished, it won't clamor as much for food.
     
    In the meantime, you need to coach yourself to relax your anxiety about weight loss. If you continued to lose two pounds a month you'd be seriously ahead in no time! And those 40 pounds would be gone for good in less than two years, which is probably a shorter amount of time than it took for you to put them on. In the meantime you'll be cementing habits that will make you happier, healthier, and stronger for the rest of your life.
  5. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from anniejean83 in Kombucha Makers Unite; Where to ask and be answered   
    Hi gang! I've hopped on the bandwagon and am attempting to grow a SCOBY in my pantry from a bottle of regular GT's and a cup of sweetened black tea. I feel like a kid again doing a science experiment. So fun!
    Though when I was in the fifth grade I never imagined I could have partners in crime from all over the world via the magic of the intarwebs. . . . Love. It.
  6. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from LisaZ in Wine: an update and some realizations   
    Your awareness is admirable and I wish you the best of luck! Since you know drinking for you is a stress-response, can you work on coming up with other ways to relieve stress? Working out, hot baths/showers, pampering myself with a pedicure, meditation and yoga are a few things that work well for me. And in having those tools I've found my attitude toward stressors has changed. I've made myself a priority so work doesn't have the same hold on me. I simply refuse to compromise myself, and funny thing: I still have a job and I seem to be even more effective at it! I hope that turns out to be the case for you, too.
  7. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from LisaZ in Wine: an update and some realizations   
    I've been lurking on this thread for some time and even read Drink on y'all's recommendation. Lots to contemplate. Thanks for helping to deepen my thinking and self reflection on this subject.
    What especially interests me is Susie's bringing up intensity. I think any addiction can be boiled down to an addiction to intensity--though the substance or behavior may vary, that's what underlies it. It's true for me and it's true for others I've observed. Anyway, I think part of the process for me is learning to be open and attuned to natural intensity rather than created intensity. The sensation I feel when I observe the quality of light during my daily walks at dusk vs. the feeling I get from a glass or two of wine. The natural high I get from dancing my hair straight while sober rather than drinking to excess and then making dubious choices.
    I very rarely drink (< once a month max), but when I do it tends to be in celebration mode and looks an awful lot like binge drinking. I can easily have a glass of wine with colleagues at a work dinner and then not think about alcohol until the next fancy work dinner. But I recognize that my behavior with alcohol can certainly be dangerous. And it doesn't make me healthier to imbibe.
    However, what's most important to me is to look at the underlying issue even more than simply eliminating alcohol, which is still a very real possibility for me. And intensity is a key. In addition to looking out for natural intensity, for me what's important is exorcising my own natural intensity through creative expression. I write, I dance, I sing, I act, I draw. We were put on this earth to create, whether we believe we're naturally creative or artists or whatever or not. Flex those muscles and call it play. Look at how kids behave for inspiration. It's not about being "good" at whatever you're doing; it's about joy.
  8. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from NoMoreCrunchyCravings in Newly compliant RX bars and the sugar dragon   
    OK, so I finally tried an RX bar yesterday and was surprised at my response, which was "Meh."
     
    I ate it at the end of a small meal with a cup of tea, and I wag my finger at myself for using it as a kind of cookie/dessert; but I also figured it might be the safest way to test the product without triggering a binge.
     
    It's definitely sweet, tasty, and very dense. I felt my heart rate increase a bit as I always do when I eat concentrated sweet stuff. And after I finished it, it felt heavy in my tum. I didn't want any more.
     
    The verdict: I will keep them as an emergency but don't see myself indulging very frequently. I prefer real food. And when I'm post W30 (I'm on Day 40 of an extended W30 right now) and craving a particular dessert, I'll either bypass it with protein and fat, or consciously and deliberately give in to the real thing when it's truly worth it.
     
    I declare this experiment a success! And want to underscore how thrilled I am by the extent to which I've come to understand and negotiate with if not slay my sugar dragon with W30.
  9. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from Robin R. in Whole 30 + Weight Watchers   
    I second the idea of working to better understand what's happening in your body at this point. You say you feel bloated. Can you pinpoint particular foods that cause bloat? As someone mentioned, looking into FODMAPs might help. Playing with your portions might also help, while also staying within the template recommendations. I know for me, my tastebuds prefer to eat the high end of fats, but my body does better eating the low end of fats. I also needed to get real about how I was using certain compliant foods. Dried fruit and nut butters are as good as candy for me--they make me less, not more, healthy, because of how I tend to eat them.
     
    This is one of the things I love and find incredibly valuable about Whole30. It's not one size fits all, and once you start, there are so many ways to take a closer look at ourselves and our behavior. Foods are healthy--or not--not just physically but psychologically. Figuring that out, and how to work with it for myself, has been revolutionary.
     
    Taking the longview is paramount. I've been Whole30ing and pursuing a Whole9 life for three years now. My massage therapist says my body composition has completely changed for the better. I know myself so much better. Even when I off road or get off track, I know how to get back. I can love and accept myself and my less-than-healthy behaviors in a new way. I am, ultimately, less fat than when I started, and wearing a smaller size. I am, ultimately, hugely more healthy in every possible way than when I started. And I did not lose dramatic numbers on the scale.
     
    In my years of doing WW on and off I could never say any of that, even when at my lowest weight, which I only ever hovered around for a flash.
     
    Oh, and one other thing: I think when folks start W30 after years of dieting of various stripes, they have a tendency to go through a re-feed period. Our bodies are clamoring for real nutrition! So, even when we have weight to lose, it comes off slowly at first, and that's actually a good thing. As you ease in and the body grows accustomed to being properly nourished, it won't clamor as much for food.
     
    In the meantime, you need to coach yourself to relax your anxiety about weight loss. If you continued to lose two pounds a month you'd be seriously ahead in no time! And those 40 pounds would be gone for good in less than two years, which is probably a shorter amount of time than it took for you to put them on. In the meantime you'll be cementing habits that will make you happier, healthier, and stronger for the rest of your life.
  10. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from NoMoreCrunchyCravings in Newly compliant RX bars and the sugar dragon   
    OK, so I finally tried an RX bar yesterday and was surprised at my response, which was "Meh."
     
    I ate it at the end of a small meal with a cup of tea, and I wag my finger at myself for using it as a kind of cookie/dessert; but I also figured it might be the safest way to test the product without triggering a binge.
     
    It's definitely sweet, tasty, and very dense. I felt my heart rate increase a bit as I always do when I eat concentrated sweet stuff. And after I finished it, it felt heavy in my tum. I didn't want any more.
     
    The verdict: I will keep them as an emergency but don't see myself indulging very frequently. I prefer real food. And when I'm post W30 (I'm on Day 40 of an extended W30 right now) and craving a particular dessert, I'll either bypass it with protein and fat, or consciously and deliberately give in to the real thing when it's truly worth it.
     
    I declare this experiment a success! And want to underscore how thrilled I am by the extent to which I've come to understand and negotiate with if not slay my sugar dragon with W30.
  11. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from RabbitFood in Cravings in day 24?   
    Congrats on resisting!
     
    The good news is you know for sure there's nothing your body actually requires from a beer. If you haven't eaten much fruit or starchy veg lately, the craving could be instructive in that you need more carbs. Or it could be as simple as stress. Stress causes cravings. And giving in to the cravings never diminishes the stress. In fact, it usually exacerbates it.
  12. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from ag919 in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    My period was five days late with my Whole30, and I've never ever ever ever in the 25 years I've been menstruating been late. Not through chemo, marathon training, nothing.
  13. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from trailrunner70 in Pre-Menstrual and I want Chocolate.....   
    There's also evidence that women crave chocolate before their periods because it's high in magnesium and THAT's what our bodies actually need. I rarely crave chocolate now that I take a magnesium supplement. And I generally need to increase my dose significantly the week before my period.
  14. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from Robin R. in Whole 30 + Weight Watchers   
    I second the idea of working to better understand what's happening in your body at this point. You say you feel bloated. Can you pinpoint particular foods that cause bloat? As someone mentioned, looking into FODMAPs might help. Playing with your portions might also help, while also staying within the template recommendations. I know for me, my tastebuds prefer to eat the high end of fats, but my body does better eating the low end of fats. I also needed to get real about how I was using certain compliant foods. Dried fruit and nut butters are as good as candy for me--they make me less, not more, healthy, because of how I tend to eat them.
     
    This is one of the things I love and find incredibly valuable about Whole30. It's not one size fits all, and once you start, there are so many ways to take a closer look at ourselves and our behavior. Foods are healthy--or not--not just physically but psychologically. Figuring that out, and how to work with it for myself, has been revolutionary.
     
    Taking the longview is paramount. I've been Whole30ing and pursuing a Whole9 life for three years now. My massage therapist says my body composition has completely changed for the better. I know myself so much better. Even when I off road or get off track, I know how to get back. I can love and accept myself and my less-than-healthy behaviors in a new way. I am, ultimately, less fat than when I started, and wearing a smaller size. I am, ultimately, hugely more healthy in every possible way than when I started. And I did not lose dramatic numbers on the scale.
     
    In my years of doing WW on and off I could never say any of that, even when at my lowest weight, which I only ever hovered around for a flash.
     
    Oh, and one other thing: I think when folks start W30 after years of dieting of various stripes, they have a tendency to go through a re-feed period. Our bodies are clamoring for real nutrition! So, even when we have weight to lose, it comes off slowly at first, and that's actually a good thing. As you ease in and the body grows accustomed to being properly nourished, it won't clamor as much for food.
     
    In the meantime, you need to coach yourself to relax your anxiety about weight loss. If you continued to lose two pounds a month you'd be seriously ahead in no time! And those 40 pounds would be gone for good in less than two years, which is probably a shorter amount of time than it took for you to put them on. In the meantime you'll be cementing habits that will make you happier, healthier, and stronger for the rest of your life.
  15. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from trailrunner70 in Pre-Menstrual and I want Chocolate.....   
    There's also evidence that women crave chocolate before their periods because it's high in magnesium and THAT's what our bodies actually need. I rarely crave chocolate now that I take a magnesium supplement. And I generally need to increase my dose significantly the week before my period.
  16. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from NatalieCatalie_ in Finished first Whole 30 but Weight Loss Is SLOOOOOOW   
    You've started a really wonderful conversation here that many of us needed to revisit! Thank you for that.
     
    I'd like to add that a six pound weight loss on W30 is more than likely a six pound fat loss. If you've done crash diets in the past and lost 6-10 pounds in a week, likely very little of that was fat and mostly water, perhaps even muscle mass. Remember that the scale doesn't tell us what, exactly, we've lost; and it certainly doesn't promise that whatever we've lost will stay off. However, with W30, you're setting yourself up for sustainable fat loss. Trust that over your past experiences with crash diets and whatever your monkey mind is telling you about the number on the scale.
     
     
    So very true. And, the marketing world wants you to believe you can get thin fast. However, it's much more invested in making sure that even if you lose weight fast you'll always get fat again so you keep coming back for more of their paid weight loss schemes that don't work. Seriously. They literally set us up to fail in order to maximize their profit. It's a vicious cycle orchestrated by greed. Let's not forget that. Ever.
     
    And keeping that in mind, we have to shift all of our expectations. We've been fed a pack of lies, and if we continue to believe effective weight loss looks like the yo-yo model (without the return back up), then we're complicit in the lies and destruction. Instead, let's explode those faulty expectations and dive into the new model of the W30 that puts our lives and health back into our own hands. Release the fear and embrace the revolution!
  17. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from Robin R. in Whole 30 + Weight Watchers   
    I second the idea of working to better understand what's happening in your body at this point. You say you feel bloated. Can you pinpoint particular foods that cause bloat? As someone mentioned, looking into FODMAPs might help. Playing with your portions might also help, while also staying within the template recommendations. I know for me, my tastebuds prefer to eat the high end of fats, but my body does better eating the low end of fats. I also needed to get real about how I was using certain compliant foods. Dried fruit and nut butters are as good as candy for me--they make me less, not more, healthy, because of how I tend to eat them.
     
    This is one of the things I love and find incredibly valuable about Whole30. It's not one size fits all, and once you start, there are so many ways to take a closer look at ourselves and our behavior. Foods are healthy--or not--not just physically but psychologically. Figuring that out, and how to work with it for myself, has been revolutionary.
     
    Taking the longview is paramount. I've been Whole30ing and pursuing a Whole9 life for three years now. My massage therapist says my body composition has completely changed for the better. I know myself so much better. Even when I off road or get off track, I know how to get back. I can love and accept myself and my less-than-healthy behaviors in a new way. I am, ultimately, less fat than when I started, and wearing a smaller size. I am, ultimately, hugely more healthy in every possible way than when I started. And I did not lose dramatic numbers on the scale.
     
    In my years of doing WW on and off I could never say any of that, even when at my lowest weight, which I only ever hovered around for a flash.
     
    Oh, and one other thing: I think when folks start W30 after years of dieting of various stripes, they have a tendency to go through a re-feed period. Our bodies are clamoring for real nutrition! So, even when we have weight to lose, it comes off slowly at first, and that's actually a good thing. As you ease in and the body grows accustomed to being properly nourished, it won't clamor as much for food.
     
    In the meantime, you need to coach yourself to relax your anxiety about weight loss. If you continued to lose two pounds a month you'd be seriously ahead in no time! And those 40 pounds would be gone for good in less than two years, which is probably a shorter amount of time than it took for you to put them on. In the meantime you'll be cementing habits that will make you happier, healthier, and stronger for the rest of your life.
  18. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from NatalieCatalie_ in Finished first Whole 30 but Weight Loss Is SLOOOOOOW   
    You've started a really wonderful conversation here that many of us needed to revisit! Thank you for that.
     
    I'd like to add that a six pound weight loss on W30 is more than likely a six pound fat loss. If you've done crash diets in the past and lost 6-10 pounds in a week, likely very little of that was fat and mostly water, perhaps even muscle mass. Remember that the scale doesn't tell us what, exactly, we've lost; and it certainly doesn't promise that whatever we've lost will stay off. However, with W30, you're setting yourself up for sustainable fat loss. Trust that over your past experiences with crash diets and whatever your monkey mind is telling you about the number on the scale.
     
     
    So very true. And, the marketing world wants you to believe you can get thin fast. However, it's much more invested in making sure that even if you lose weight fast you'll always get fat again so you keep coming back for more of their paid weight loss schemes that don't work. Seriously. They literally set us up to fail in order to maximize their profit. It's a vicious cycle orchestrated by greed. Let's not forget that. Ever.
     
    And keeping that in mind, we have to shift all of our expectations. We've been fed a pack of lies, and if we continue to believe effective weight loss looks like the yo-yo model (without the return back up), then we're complicit in the lies and destruction. Instead, let's explode those faulty expectations and dive into the new model of the W30 that puts our lives and health back into our own hands. Release the fear and embrace the revolution!
  19. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from Robin R. in Whole 30 + Weight Watchers   
    I second the idea of working to better understand what's happening in your body at this point. You say you feel bloated. Can you pinpoint particular foods that cause bloat? As someone mentioned, looking into FODMAPs might help. Playing with your portions might also help, while also staying within the template recommendations. I know for me, my tastebuds prefer to eat the high end of fats, but my body does better eating the low end of fats. I also needed to get real about how I was using certain compliant foods. Dried fruit and nut butters are as good as candy for me--they make me less, not more, healthy, because of how I tend to eat them.
     
    This is one of the things I love and find incredibly valuable about Whole30. It's not one size fits all, and once you start, there are so many ways to take a closer look at ourselves and our behavior. Foods are healthy--or not--not just physically but psychologically. Figuring that out, and how to work with it for myself, has been revolutionary.
     
    Taking the longview is paramount. I've been Whole30ing and pursuing a Whole9 life for three years now. My massage therapist says my body composition has completely changed for the better. I know myself so much better. Even when I off road or get off track, I know how to get back. I can love and accept myself and my less-than-healthy behaviors in a new way. I am, ultimately, less fat than when I started, and wearing a smaller size. I am, ultimately, hugely more healthy in every possible way than when I started. And I did not lose dramatic numbers on the scale.
     
    In my years of doing WW on and off I could never say any of that, even when at my lowest weight, which I only ever hovered around for a flash.
     
    Oh, and one other thing: I think when folks start W30 after years of dieting of various stripes, they have a tendency to go through a re-feed period. Our bodies are clamoring for real nutrition! So, even when we have weight to lose, it comes off slowly at first, and that's actually a good thing. As you ease in and the body grows accustomed to being properly nourished, it won't clamor as much for food.
     
    In the meantime, you need to coach yourself to relax your anxiety about weight loss. If you continued to lose two pounds a month you'd be seriously ahead in no time! And those 40 pounds would be gone for good in less than two years, which is probably a shorter amount of time than it took for you to put them on. In the meantime you'll be cementing habits that will make you happier, healthier, and stronger for the rest of your life.
  20. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from Robin R. in Whole 30 + Weight Watchers   
    I second the idea of working to better understand what's happening in your body at this point. You say you feel bloated. Can you pinpoint particular foods that cause bloat? As someone mentioned, looking into FODMAPs might help. Playing with your portions might also help, while also staying within the template recommendations. I know for me, my tastebuds prefer to eat the high end of fats, but my body does better eating the low end of fats. I also needed to get real about how I was using certain compliant foods. Dried fruit and nut butters are as good as candy for me--they make me less, not more, healthy, because of how I tend to eat them.
     
    This is one of the things I love and find incredibly valuable about Whole30. It's not one size fits all, and once you start, there are so many ways to take a closer look at ourselves and our behavior. Foods are healthy--or not--not just physically but psychologically. Figuring that out, and how to work with it for myself, has been revolutionary.
     
    Taking the longview is paramount. I've been Whole30ing and pursuing a Whole9 life for three years now. My massage therapist says my body composition has completely changed for the better. I know myself so much better. Even when I off road or get off track, I know how to get back. I can love and accept myself and my less-than-healthy behaviors in a new way. I am, ultimately, less fat than when I started, and wearing a smaller size. I am, ultimately, hugely more healthy in every possible way than when I started. And I did not lose dramatic numbers on the scale.
     
    In my years of doing WW on and off I could never say any of that, even when at my lowest weight, which I only ever hovered around for a flash.
     
    Oh, and one other thing: I think when folks start W30 after years of dieting of various stripes, they have a tendency to go through a re-feed period. Our bodies are clamoring for real nutrition! So, even when we have weight to lose, it comes off slowly at first, and that's actually a good thing. As you ease in and the body grows accustomed to being properly nourished, it won't clamor as much for food.
     
    In the meantime, you need to coach yourself to relax your anxiety about weight loss. If you continued to lose two pounds a month you'd be seriously ahead in no time! And those 40 pounds would be gone for good in less than two years, which is probably a shorter amount of time than it took for you to put them on. In the meantime you'll be cementing habits that will make you happier, healthier, and stronger for the rest of your life.
  21. Like
    LadyM reacted to SaraRuns in LadyM's seduction continues (sur son propre velo)   
    I've been checking in to see if anyone else is around.
    No W30 for me, but it is good to see (read) you!  You'll have to share more of what's been going on this summer.
  22. Like
    LadyM reacted to danielleavincent in Day 39: last day reflections, results, & tips   
    As the Grateful Dead says, "What a long, strange trip it's been."
    Yes, I do know how to count, and I do realize 39 is more than 30. 10 days into the Whole30, I realized my husband used vegetable oil to cook some salmon. When I read the vegetable oil ingredients, I found (with great frustration) that it contained soybean oil (jerks!).
    Here I am, on the eve of the last day of my Whole30. I really enjoyed reading these posts when I was just getting started, so I figured I'd share the love.
    First, if you're just getting started or are considering getting started, I want you to know it will be simultaneously very easy and incredibly difficult to do this. And that's exactly why you should definitely do this.
    In the first week, I had a sticky on my computer that said, "just because it's easy, doesn't mean it's not worth it." And then it got really hard, and I took the sticker off.
    The Whole30 has not just changed my relationship with food, it has changed my relationship with alcohol, with my friends, and even (most importantly) with my husband. When I looked back over my journal, I realized that before the Whole30, I was hung over or not feeling great (tired, angry, unmotivated, foggy) nearly every day. I started the program because I have my own business and I also do contracting work for a large company as a Marketing and Content person. Life was very stressful, and I literally couldn't afford to go around foggy and unmotivated. We have a huge conference coming up and I'm largely a one-woman-show marketing the conference, so the stakes are high. I figured if I could have only one benefit from the Whole30, I would want to get my motivation and focus back.
    Spoiler alert: I got it back within the first week.
    I also had 40 lbs to lose to get to my goal weight, I would regularly wake up at 3AM with panic attacks, I had a rash on my leg for the past 15 years that wouldn't go away no matter what, and more importantly, my life just wasn't going how I wanted it to go. I was bored a lot, and boredom makes me suicidal. Literally. Oh yeah, did I mention I also suffer from depression, anxiety, and ADD?
    My husband, while a sweet and valiant and wonderful man, didn’t want to commit to my “crazy diet.” He halfheartedly committed not to drinking at the house (more on that exciting story arc later).
    The first two days hit me like a truck.
    Thankfully, I had felt so bad before, it hardly seemed much different. Headache, nausea, muscle aches, sour mood, etc… all the familiar trappings of a regular old fashioned hangover. Familiar! No big deal!
    After that, it was really great. I went through a couple rough patches in the first week or two, but mostly it was smooth sailing. My energy was up, my mood was good, and I was thinking clearly.
    I honestly think 100% of that benefit was from not drinking.
    A side note about my drinking: I was a pretty heavy drinker. My husband and I probably drank a bottle of wine each per night. I knew the alcohol would be a big part of the thing, so two weeks into the whole thing, I found a book called the 30 Day Sobriety Solution. If you are reading along thinking, “oh no, but my wine!” (or even if not) I truly recommend this book. It has daily exercises that address every aspect of the psychological trauma that eliminating alcohol (or really, anything, but it’s about alcohol) entails. I don’t know if I would have been able to do it without the book.
    On day 10, when my husband cooked that fateful salmon and sent me back to day 1, I can’t even tell you how mad I was. In retrospect, it seems silly. 10 days in? Psha! Nothing! But at the time, it felt like I was playing Monopoly and I just got sent to Jail. (don’t worry, I wasn’t mad at him, just at the oil)
    Some people would say that a tiny little vegetable oil was fine (it’s in the acceptable food list), but I had set my intention that I wanted to do this right, and so I reset my emails and started over (btw, the emails are a great resource).
    But then, day 13 happened. Predictably, there was a massive setback in my journey. And also predictably, the setback was around alcohol.
    See, my husband and I have been drinkers forever. Like, since we were 18 (we’re in our 40s). As you’ll recall, he was not enthusiastic about giving up alcohol, and my not drinking was really difficult for both of us. We went camping with some friends on day 13, and I asked him to support me by not drinking on the trip, since I knew that was going to be my biggest challenge yet. He agreed. But when we were camping, “not drinking” became “not drinking in front of me,” which was not what we agreed to at all.
    I got mad and we cut the trip short, and that kicked off the worst fight we have ever had in our four years of marriage. For the first, time I wasn’t entirely confident we were going to be together forever. I can’t even explain to you how heartbreaking and mortifying this was.
    I really loved my new diet, and I especially loved not drinking. He loved neither of these things, and for a time, it seemed like we might be on different paths. We could hold it together for a while, but really, can one alcoholic go sober and stay with another alcoholic who kept drinking? Was it really worth it for a diet? Couldn’t I just go back to drinking?
    It was a real low time.
    And then he suddenly experienced a lot of sharp pain and we went to the ER for his stomach. The ER determined it wasn’t an emergency, but did tell him to get an ultrasound to see what was going on in there. I think it was kind of a wake up call, and he agreed to stop drinking through the end of the Whole30. I also think he saw that our relationship was really at risk, and his behavior was the least healthy of the choices.
    I was and am so grateful that he decided to quit drinking with me.
    We re-arranged our living room and hid the TV behind the couch so our old habit of drinking in front of the TV wasn’t so conspicuously missing (it’s unplugged, but if we really want to watch a movie, we can dig it out).
    Re-arranging the living room set off a chain of reactions that included me finishing a painting so we could put it on the newly blank wall, and finishing the curtains I had been meaning to sew. Our whole space is reorganized for living, not watching.
    (All of these changes were because of the exercises in the 30 Day Sobriety Solution book.)
    We’ve talked about it since, and he now is glad we both quit drinking. He doesn’t want to back to our old way of life either. He’s still not on board with the food changes, but hey, that’s fine. We’re all where we’re at, right?
    The Results
    Last week, I broke down and weighed myself. I had lost 10 lbs since starting the plan! My clothes fit differently, and most of the weight seems to have come off my stomach. My depression is better (though I’m still on medication and don’t feel the need to change it) and my skin is clearer. My face used to be kind of puffy (I wish I took before and after), but now it is thinner (and no double chin anymore!). The other day, after I put on makeup, I realized that my skin looks dull with makeup on, and glows without it. I still have red patches, but now I mix my foundation with moisturizer so it’s more sheer. My knees don't hurt as much (they were pretty painful) and I sleep pretty well -- no more panic attacks at all. Not even one.
    Most importantly, my relationship with my husband is better. I know we’ll live longer and happier lives together because of this.
    I had to change my relationships with several of my friends… unfortunately, I realized some of my drinking buddy friends were just drinking buddies. Now, I seek out relationships with positive people who share my joy of life.
    I'm going to weigh myself again tomorrow (the official end), but I can tell I have lost more weight.
    I am absolutely going to stick with the plan moving forward, but I am making an exception of going out to eat. I didn't eat out even a single time on the plan just because I don't trust the ingredients in anything that I don't fix myself, but I want to go out periodically. I'll still order stuff on plan, but if someone uses vegetable oil, I'm not going to raise a federal case about it.
     
    I know this is really long, but I hope it helps. I read the forums in the beginning and didn't see anything like this, so I wanted to share.
    Much love,
    Danielle
     
  23. Like
    LadyM reacted to SaraRuns in LadyM's seduction continues (sur son propre velo)   
    So how did graduation go?  Are you settling into your summer break?
     
    Hope all is well!
  24. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from illiah in LadyM's seduction continues (sur son propre velo)   
    Day 10
    M1 swirly quiche, bone broth, 8:30
    M2 goulash soup, kraut, kale chips, strawberries, 2:45
    M3 bison steak, slaw, strawberries, kale chips, booch, 7:15
    Exercise: 90 min yoga, 2.5 mile walk
    Chilly here again, so I'm enjoying some morning bone broth as I type. Yoga this morning was a little less painful today, partly because I'm healing, and partly because I humbled myself enough to use blocks in some standing forward bending postures. I know this painful experience is rich with life lessons I haven't yet become aware of. Staying open to that rather than staying mad. This is a good thing.
    My evening ritual walk continues to satisfy me, and yesterday I had the added benefit of an unexpected compliment from BFF. He said I look like I'm losing again. That makes me very happy. Perhaps my 30 day experiment is already yielding positive results. I see him at noon for a massage, finally, after 6 weeks of cancellations and rescheduling. Hoping he can help. Then back to my old chiro this evening for another adjustment. Little by little. And then I'll be ready for some physical therapy in short order. Really looking forward to the continuing treasure hunt and learning to recalibrate and never take my body and good health for granted!
    Had an enlightening session with my therapist yesterday, too. We talked about and named my continuing grief about my mom's death and permanent physical absence from my life as well as my pattern of creating intensity to avoid feeling the depth of my grief. Obsessing about diet, overdoing exercise, sporadic binge drinking and eating . . . all of these, among others, fit the pattern. So, now that I have new awareness, the challenge is to stay open to natural intensity (the quality of light and bright green leaves and grass on my evening walks, for example) rather than creating often destructive intensity. My work now is to settle into the ordinariness of life right now. Hunker down into the reality of grief--the tiredness and lack of desire that make me antsy. That, and keep moving my body, writing, eating healthy, and meditating. This is my prescription, and I'm an excellent patient.
    And one of these days I'll get back on my bike and get back to the beach, two of my most beloved forms of natural intensity. All in due time.
  25. Like
    LadyM got a reaction from Knittykitty333 in One year, one W47 plus a W85 later I finally feel like a success   
    Though I completed my first W30, a W47, actually, in May 2013, this is my first time writing a success story. So much has happened between my W47 a year ago and the W85 I just completed that I can finally feel like a success even though I still haven't achieved the kind of magic I (falsely) expected when I first decided to give W30 a shot. And that's why I'm writing this. For all the people who begin W30 believing it will be the final magic bullet they've been hoping for but then perhaps find something else different than what they expected.

    For me that something else has been far grander than what I could have imagined.

    I was one of those people who didn't lose weight and may have even gained some during my first attempt at this. But I came back one year later for another go round because of what it set in motion. Whole 30 has dramatically changed my relationship with food and with my body for the better. This is the dream of all dreams come true, I now realize.

    Here's what's changed for me:

    1. I eat three meals a day, no snacks, no problem.

    2. I no longer suffer from sugar cravings of any kind. No real or fake sugar, fruit, or nuts and nut butters call the siren song.

    3. My digestion and elimination are regular and gas is infrequent.

    4. Food is not a reward. It doesn't set me on fire, bring me up, or bring me down. Food is food. And I take genuine pleasure in preparing and eating it. I have finally learned the importance, meaning, and practice of savoring food.

    5. My mood is stable and I am a nicer person.

    6. I have made sleep and stress reduction a priority, and I now sleep the sleep of angels. Every night.

    7. My skin is clearer (acne has been a serious problem since puberty).

    8. Despite an injury set back, exercise is a regular habit.

    9. I have finally lost some weight. Some time around day 60 I was about 8 pounds down, and I don't know what that number is now, but it doesn't seem like much more than that. My clothes aren't hanging off me, though my smaller clothes are fitting me better.

    10. I am no longer at war with my body. I accept it for its protean nature, and I am much more attuned to its needs and hungers, most of which have nothing to do with food now because I have learned to genuinely nourish myself.
     
    In between my W30 experiences, my mom died from kidney failure, a complication resulting from diabetes and heart disease. I could not save her, and my grief significantly affected my own health. One of the ways I can make sense of her early death is to learn from it, and to choose to thoroughly care for myself in ways she never managed to care for herself.

    During my most recent W85, my dad came to visit me, and I gave him three days of compliant meals as well as a copy of It Starts With Food. He has been morbidly obese for most of my life and on a roller coaster of diets and weight loss successes and failures for most of his life. With the support of OA, which he began a year and a half ago, and the tools of ISWF, he and his wife, who suffers from MS, have completed a W30 and are living a W9 life that is transforming their health for the better. This makes me at least as happy and proud as my own success with W30.

    There is no end point for me. As long as I live, I will need to tend to my body, a complex organism complicated by childhood cancer and its treatments that left my immune system in shambles and my thyroid obliterated. I am working with a functional medicine doctor I trust to help my body heal and repair itself. She supports the W9 lifestyle, and I finally feel I am receiving the kind of integrative medicine I've needed for decades. I also trust now that my body wants to heal and that it will take persistence and patience on my part.

    So, I move forward with joy and with gratitude for this program, the wonderful supportive community of this forum, and for my doggedness in finding and staying on my own peculiar path. I will continue eating W30 style with minimal off roading only when I can truly savor the experience. And I'll be checking in while riding my own bike here.