Karen

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  1. Thanks
    Karen got a reaction from Penny_gaga in Started Whole30 and My Period is Early/Late   
    One of our members, @Karen, wrote up this explanation a while back of why your period may have come early or late during (usually) your first Whole30. I thought it was far too good to let it be lost in the depths of the forum so I've pinned it to the top of the Ladies Only section. Hopefully if you're a little nervous or worried about your early or "missing" period, this will help explain what may be happening. As with all things on this forum, no one here is medically trained and this information is not meant to be taken as medical advice. If you are nervous or concerned, please see your doctor. ~ Ladyshanny
     
    Here's my synopsis of it all - someone else can chime in if I'm not 100% or if there's more to the story... I'm going off memory and not consulting my sources for the fine details. My cycles used to be all over the place and I took the time to figure it all out, but I'm going by memory here... This applies to those that AREN'T on hormonal birth control.
    Although we tend to think of our cycles in terms of our actual period, ovulation actually runs the show. From the time you have your period until you ovulate, estrogen is dominant. Once your FSH and estrogen levels reach a peak level, your body decides, "hey, I can ovulate now". For most people, this takes about 14 days from the first day of our period to happen, but for some, it can take much longer. Things like stress (eh hem, diet changes!, stress from work/relationships, car accident, etc.) can actually prevent ovulation for a little bit while your body figures out what's going on. After all, it doesn't want to allow you to get pregnant while the body is under stress, so it holds onto that egg until it knows all is well.
    However, once you ovulate, your body has a finite amount of time until you'll get your period. For most, that's 12-14 days. From ovulation until your period, progesterone is dominant. Your progesterone levels raise until it realizes your body isn't pregnant, and then when your progesterone levels drop, that prompts your period, and it starts all over again. Got it? (Interesting side note - progesterone actually causes your body temp to rise. That's why people TTC and trying NOT TC take their temps. When temps rise, you've ovulated, and when it drops, you can expect your period within a day or two.)
     
    If you just started a Whole30 and your period is late, it's quite likely that ovulation was delayed due to stress. You'll still have about 12-14 days from ovulation until your period, so delayed ovulation means delayed period. Granted, there could be other reasons, but if you were completely regular your entire life and all of a sudden this threw things for a loop, that's a possible explanation. That's how it typically is for me. Another reason is that for those that are estrogen-dominant, you may not have as much progesterone, so instead of getting that 12-14 days between your period and ovulation, you might normally, for example, only 8 days. But when you change your diet and balance your hormones, poof, your progesterone levels kick in and you may get a few more good days between ovulation and your period! For those TTC, that's super important. But if you're just counting the days from your last period, it may seem a bit late.
    For those of you that end up with your period earlier than expected while on a Whole30, there can be a few possible theories, but they all depend on where you are in your cycle and where your hormones are at. If your body has been trying to ovulate but it's taking longer than normal due to perceived stress, your endometrium is still thickening that whole time, and your body may need to release some of it (spotting). Your body could even say, "screw it, there's no way we're ovulating this month!" and your period could start without even ovulating (that's an annovulatory cycle). If you've already ovulated and your hormones are in flux, perhaps your progesterone levels have dropped temporarily, which means your period starts sooner than normal instead of getting those 12-14 days between ovulation and your period. I'm sure there are other reasons, but those are my best guesses for those that are curious.
    Rest assured, at some point, your body will figure out that the diet changes are actually a good thing. Typically within a cycle or two, estrogen and progesterone will balance out how they should, your luteal phase (between ovulation and your period) will be the appropriate length, and all is well in the world. For those that are concerned about TTC, I HIGHLY recommend Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Wexler. She explains all this, how to track your cycles (that's the only way I could make sense of my goofy cycles for a while), and how you can correct any oddballs that you run into!
  2. Like
    Karen got a reaction from Zee_1 in Thyroid issues?   
    I'm going to post my experiences:
    Have had hypo symptoms since I can remember as a kid. In college, doctors started testing my TSH - was always perfect - in the 1-2 range. I always had symptoms, always got tested, and was always told it was fine. Oh, and my cholesterol started creeping higher and higher every year.
    Fast forward to 2008/2009 - found out I had endometriosis and put my nose in as many books as I could find. Was convinced I was estrogen dominant so I found an awesome independent doc (MD with one food in alternative med) that eventually found all my hormones low across the board - cortisol, progesterone, testosterone, estrogen, etc. and we started supplementing with various things to see if we could get my levels to rise at all, normalize my cycles, and reduce the pain from endometriosis. Even ruled out a pituitary tumor as everything was just low across the board. Hit a sweet spot with bio-identical progesterone in terms of pain relief, but I still felt awful. Sluggish, tired, gained weight at the drop of a hat, just miserable. So, we finally realized we hadn't done a full thyroid panel and - of course - free T3 and free T4 were low as well, despite having a perfect TSH.
    I tried synthroid - big fail. It brought my body to a halt even on the smallest dose. I was on it for a month and realized it was a chore to even bring my hand to my mouth to eat... It was really bad. I was in a huge fog and in slow motion. Then, we tried dessicated thyroid hormone. It didn't have an effect as extreme as synthroid so I tried it longer, but in the end, had the same result. I gained more weight than ever. Got my reverse T3 levels testing and had a super high ration of T3/RT3. I stopped the dessicated. I really, really, really wanted that to work, particularly after all I had read on STTM. It seems my body doesn't like to convert T4 into T3.
    So... finally started on Cytomel. It's straight up T3 and bypasses the conversion from T4 to T3. I got my life back, to an extent. My cholesterol dropped by 50 points, though it's still high. I was able to drop about 10 pounds effortlessly, though that's tapered and I still have ways to go. Still felt a lot of adrenal issues and have started on the circadian T3 method - essentially waking up in the wee hours of the night to take my first dose of cytomel for the day so it'll kick in while my body is creating cortisol. I'm seeing changes but haven't hit the sweet spot.
    Throughout all of this, I've been eating pretty clean (no gluten, dairy, caffeine, eggs, citrus, minimal sugar, minimal processed foods, etc.) but just started a Whole30 to see if I can get my body to work even better so I can take only the minimal amount of thyroid hormone needed in order to feel good.
    My advice for those of you that are only given synthroid as an option - try it if you must, and if you're still not feeling well, track your symptoms so you can put them in front of your doctor as proof as to how you're doing, despite 'normal' labs. www.reliefinsite.com is a fab pain tracker but will also let you track multiple other symptoms, and lets you print out reports and even share access with your doc! It's hard to dismiss symptoms when you put a graph in front of them that shows your energy levels increasing/decreasing on a certain med... I'm lucky that my doctor is awesome and tells me to stop a drug as soon as I don't feel well on it (which is really common for me) and lets me try whatever I want, but I had to go through a few awful ones before I got to her. Be persistent or find a new doctor. It's your body - listen to it!
    (Sorry for writing a book - I'm really passionate about undiagnosed or poorly treated thyroid issues - with good reason!)
  3. Like
    Karen got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    I almost always have delayed ovulation if I start a Whole 30 before I ovulate, even if I was following pretty closely prior. I start them after ovulation now! Diet changes can throw the body for a loop... And the body is smart enough not to get pregnant when there are fast changes (think drought, famine back in caveman days), so ovulation can be delayed until it figures out conditions are safe for a possible pregnancy. Make sure you're eating plenty, and getting plenty of fat. Eventually, your body will realize conditions are great for conception and you'll ovulate. 
  4. Thanks
    Karen got a reaction from Penny_gaga in Started Whole30 and My Period is Early/Late   
    One of our members, @Karen, wrote up this explanation a while back of why your period may have come early or late during (usually) your first Whole30. I thought it was far too good to let it be lost in the depths of the forum so I've pinned it to the top of the Ladies Only section. Hopefully if you're a little nervous or worried about your early or "missing" period, this will help explain what may be happening. As with all things on this forum, no one here is medically trained and this information is not meant to be taken as medical advice. If you are nervous or concerned, please see your doctor. ~ Ladyshanny
     
    Here's my synopsis of it all - someone else can chime in if I'm not 100% or if there's more to the story... I'm going off memory and not consulting my sources for the fine details. My cycles used to be all over the place and I took the time to figure it all out, but I'm going by memory here... This applies to those that AREN'T on hormonal birth control.
    Although we tend to think of our cycles in terms of our actual period, ovulation actually runs the show. From the time you have your period until you ovulate, estrogen is dominant. Once your FSH and estrogen levels reach a peak level, your body decides, "hey, I can ovulate now". For most people, this takes about 14 days from the first day of our period to happen, but for some, it can take much longer. Things like stress (eh hem, diet changes!, stress from work/relationships, car accident, etc.) can actually prevent ovulation for a little bit while your body figures out what's going on. After all, it doesn't want to allow you to get pregnant while the body is under stress, so it holds onto that egg until it knows all is well.
    However, once you ovulate, your body has a finite amount of time until you'll get your period. For most, that's 12-14 days. From ovulation until your period, progesterone is dominant. Your progesterone levels raise until it realizes your body isn't pregnant, and then when your progesterone levels drop, that prompts your period, and it starts all over again. Got it? (Interesting side note - progesterone actually causes your body temp to rise. That's why people TTC and trying NOT TC take their temps. When temps rise, you've ovulated, and when it drops, you can expect your period within a day or two.)
     
    If you just started a Whole30 and your period is late, it's quite likely that ovulation was delayed due to stress. You'll still have about 12-14 days from ovulation until your period, so delayed ovulation means delayed period. Granted, there could be other reasons, but if you were completely regular your entire life and all of a sudden this threw things for a loop, that's a possible explanation. That's how it typically is for me. Another reason is that for those that are estrogen-dominant, you may not have as much progesterone, so instead of getting that 12-14 days between your period and ovulation, you might normally, for example, only 8 days. But when you change your diet and balance your hormones, poof, your progesterone levels kick in and you may get a few more good days between ovulation and your period! For those TTC, that's super important. But if you're just counting the days from your last period, it may seem a bit late.
    For those of you that end up with your period earlier than expected while on a Whole30, there can be a few possible theories, but they all depend on where you are in your cycle and where your hormones are at. If your body has been trying to ovulate but it's taking longer than normal due to perceived stress, your endometrium is still thickening that whole time, and your body may need to release some of it (spotting). Your body could even say, "screw it, there's no way we're ovulating this month!" and your period could start without even ovulating (that's an annovulatory cycle). If you've already ovulated and your hormones are in flux, perhaps your progesterone levels have dropped temporarily, which means your period starts sooner than normal instead of getting those 12-14 days between ovulation and your period. I'm sure there are other reasons, but those are my best guesses for those that are curious.
    Rest assured, at some point, your body will figure out that the diet changes are actually a good thing. Typically within a cycle or two, estrogen and progesterone will balance out how they should, your luteal phase (between ovulation and your period) will be the appropriate length, and all is well in the world. For those that are concerned about TTC, I HIGHLY recommend Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Wexler. She explains all this, how to track your cycles (that's the only way I could make sense of my goofy cycles for a while), and how you can correct any oddballs that you run into!
  5. Thanks
    Karen got a reaction from Penny_gaga in Started Whole30 and My Period is Early/Late   
    One of our members, @Karen, wrote up this explanation a while back of why your period may have come early or late during (usually) your first Whole30. I thought it was far too good to let it be lost in the depths of the forum so I've pinned it to the top of the Ladies Only section. Hopefully if you're a little nervous or worried about your early or "missing" period, this will help explain what may be happening. As with all things on this forum, no one here is medically trained and this information is not meant to be taken as medical advice. If you are nervous or concerned, please see your doctor. ~ Ladyshanny
     
    Here's my synopsis of it all - someone else can chime in if I'm not 100% or if there's more to the story... I'm going off memory and not consulting my sources for the fine details. My cycles used to be all over the place and I took the time to figure it all out, but I'm going by memory here... This applies to those that AREN'T on hormonal birth control.
    Although we tend to think of our cycles in terms of our actual period, ovulation actually runs the show. From the time you have your period until you ovulate, estrogen is dominant. Once your FSH and estrogen levels reach a peak level, your body decides, "hey, I can ovulate now". For most people, this takes about 14 days from the first day of our period to happen, but for some, it can take much longer. Things like stress (eh hem, diet changes!, stress from work/relationships, car accident, etc.) can actually prevent ovulation for a little bit while your body figures out what's going on. After all, it doesn't want to allow you to get pregnant while the body is under stress, so it holds onto that egg until it knows all is well.
    However, once you ovulate, your body has a finite amount of time until you'll get your period. For most, that's 12-14 days. From ovulation until your period, progesterone is dominant. Your progesterone levels raise until it realizes your body isn't pregnant, and then when your progesterone levels drop, that prompts your period, and it starts all over again. Got it? (Interesting side note - progesterone actually causes your body temp to rise. That's why people TTC and trying NOT TC take their temps. When temps rise, you've ovulated, and when it drops, you can expect your period within a day or two.)
     
    If you just started a Whole30 and your period is late, it's quite likely that ovulation was delayed due to stress. You'll still have about 12-14 days from ovulation until your period, so delayed ovulation means delayed period. Granted, there could be other reasons, but if you were completely regular your entire life and all of a sudden this threw things for a loop, that's a possible explanation. That's how it typically is for me. Another reason is that for those that are estrogen-dominant, you may not have as much progesterone, so instead of getting that 12-14 days between your period and ovulation, you might normally, for example, only 8 days. But when you change your diet and balance your hormones, poof, your progesterone levels kick in and you may get a few more good days between ovulation and your period! For those TTC, that's super important. But if you're just counting the days from your last period, it may seem a bit late.
    For those of you that end up with your period earlier than expected while on a Whole30, there can be a few possible theories, but they all depend on where you are in your cycle and where your hormones are at. If your body has been trying to ovulate but it's taking longer than normal due to perceived stress, your endometrium is still thickening that whole time, and your body may need to release some of it (spotting). Your body could even say, "screw it, there's no way we're ovulating this month!" and your period could start without even ovulating (that's an annovulatory cycle). If you've already ovulated and your hormones are in flux, perhaps your progesterone levels have dropped temporarily, which means your period starts sooner than normal instead of getting those 12-14 days between ovulation and your period. I'm sure there are other reasons, but those are my best guesses for those that are curious.
    Rest assured, at some point, your body will figure out that the diet changes are actually a good thing. Typically within a cycle or two, estrogen and progesterone will balance out how they should, your luteal phase (between ovulation and your period) will be the appropriate length, and all is well in the world. For those that are concerned about TTC, I HIGHLY recommend Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Wexler. She explains all this, how to track your cycles (that's the only way I could make sense of my goofy cycles for a while), and how you can correct any oddballs that you run into!
  6. Thanks
    Karen got a reaction from Penny_gaga in Started Whole30 and My Period is Early/Late   
    One of our members, @Karen, wrote up this explanation a while back of why your period may have come early or late during (usually) your first Whole30. I thought it was far too good to let it be lost in the depths of the forum so I've pinned it to the top of the Ladies Only section. Hopefully if you're a little nervous or worried about your early or "missing" period, this will help explain what may be happening. As with all things on this forum, no one here is medically trained and this information is not meant to be taken as medical advice. If you are nervous or concerned, please see your doctor. ~ Ladyshanny
     
    Here's my synopsis of it all - someone else can chime in if I'm not 100% or if there's more to the story... I'm going off memory and not consulting my sources for the fine details. My cycles used to be all over the place and I took the time to figure it all out, but I'm going by memory here... This applies to those that AREN'T on hormonal birth control.
    Although we tend to think of our cycles in terms of our actual period, ovulation actually runs the show. From the time you have your period until you ovulate, estrogen is dominant. Once your FSH and estrogen levels reach a peak level, your body decides, "hey, I can ovulate now". For most people, this takes about 14 days from the first day of our period to happen, but for some, it can take much longer. Things like stress (eh hem, diet changes!, stress from work/relationships, car accident, etc.) can actually prevent ovulation for a little bit while your body figures out what's going on. After all, it doesn't want to allow you to get pregnant while the body is under stress, so it holds onto that egg until it knows all is well.
    However, once you ovulate, your body has a finite amount of time until you'll get your period. For most, that's 12-14 days. From ovulation until your period, progesterone is dominant. Your progesterone levels raise until it realizes your body isn't pregnant, and then when your progesterone levels drop, that prompts your period, and it starts all over again. Got it? (Interesting side note - progesterone actually causes your body temp to rise. That's why people TTC and trying NOT TC take their temps. When temps rise, you've ovulated, and when it drops, you can expect your period within a day or two.)
     
    If you just started a Whole30 and your period is late, it's quite likely that ovulation was delayed due to stress. You'll still have about 12-14 days from ovulation until your period, so delayed ovulation means delayed period. Granted, there could be other reasons, but if you were completely regular your entire life and all of a sudden this threw things for a loop, that's a possible explanation. That's how it typically is for me. Another reason is that for those that are estrogen-dominant, you may not have as much progesterone, so instead of getting that 12-14 days between your period and ovulation, you might normally, for example, only 8 days. But when you change your diet and balance your hormones, poof, your progesterone levels kick in and you may get a few more good days between ovulation and your period! For those TTC, that's super important. But if you're just counting the days from your last period, it may seem a bit late.
    For those of you that end up with your period earlier than expected while on a Whole30, there can be a few possible theories, but they all depend on where you are in your cycle and where your hormones are at. If your body has been trying to ovulate but it's taking longer than normal due to perceived stress, your endometrium is still thickening that whole time, and your body may need to release some of it (spotting). Your body could even say, "screw it, there's no way we're ovulating this month!" and your period could start without even ovulating (that's an annovulatory cycle). If you've already ovulated and your hormones are in flux, perhaps your progesterone levels have dropped temporarily, which means your period starts sooner than normal instead of getting those 12-14 days between ovulation and your period. I'm sure there are other reasons, but those are my best guesses for those that are curious.
    Rest assured, at some point, your body will figure out that the diet changes are actually a good thing. Typically within a cycle or two, estrogen and progesterone will balance out how they should, your luteal phase (between ovulation and your period) will be the appropriate length, and all is well in the world. For those that are concerned about TTC, I HIGHLY recommend Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Wexler. She explains all this, how to track your cycles (that's the only way I could make sense of my goofy cycles for a while), and how you can correct any oddballs that you run into!
  7. Like
    Karen got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    I almost always have delayed ovulation if I start a Whole 30 before I ovulate, even if I was following pretty closely prior. I start them after ovulation now! Diet changes can throw the body for a loop... And the body is smart enough not to get pregnant when there are fast changes (think drought, famine back in caveman days), so ovulation can be delayed until it figures out conditions are safe for a possible pregnancy. Make sure you're eating plenty, and getting plenty of fat. Eventually, your body will realize conditions are great for conception and you'll ovulate. 
  8. Like
    Karen got a reaction from krazy4whole30 in Pregnant...small/mini meals   
    A little background - I've been eating more whole 30-ish over the past 4 years than I haven't.  Pregnancy is a whole different ballgame. I'm 18 weeks now. From about 8 weeks to 17 weeks, it was near impossible to eat anything whole 30 complaint.  Just thinking about meat would make me sick sometimes!  I threw up once just prior to putting chicken in a pan.  Veg sounded disgusting. I threw up an entire salad once and haven't gone back.
    I always thought food aversions during pregnancy were just mind over matter. Ha, was I wrong!  I always thought I'd be able to eat as healthy during pregnancy but it's been near impossible.  My suggestion is to eat whatever you can right now. Keep food in your tummy.  The more hungry I was, the more nauseous.  The food aversions and nausea will pass. You can eat well then.  Just try to survive the first tri, and challenge your eating when food actually sounds good. 
    As for me, I'll be starting another Whole 30 next week at 19 weeks. I'm finally ready, I think. 
  9. Like
    Karen got a reaction from Annie Schunior in Hormonal Cravings   
    Yup, PMS will lead to cravings. Your body needs a LOT more nutrients during the second half of your cycle. It has to assume you're pregnant and ramps up the body to prep for that. Once you get your period, your body doesn't need as much and the cravings subside.
    Most do well eating lots more compliant carbs during this time. Eat more in general, but get more carbs in. More fat may help, too. I've read a chocolate craving may be specific to a magnesium need, so consider magnesium rich foods or supplements. 
    Just know that this is biology and survival of the species at work here. Work with it. It's not a willpower issue, as we've often been led to believe when it comes to PMS.
  10. Like
    Karen reacted to littleg in First post as a mom! About constipation... sigh   
    Just wanted to update this.  Full serving of magnesium (800mg I believe, Magnesium Serene) and lots of cooked and cooled potatoes.  Gutsense.org planted the seed for the potatoes.  In the past when I overdid it on potatoes I noticed poop got softer so I figured I'd try it again.  Not sure if its one or the other or both.  But 'rhoids are finally going into hiding and the rabbit pellets are gone! 
  11. Like
    Karen reacted to bjvdsteen in Alcohol Dependence   
    I know this thread is over a year old, but I feel the need to respond. I am on Day 13 of my first Whole30. I was scared to death of failure, since I fear I may be an alcoholic.Gin and tonic on coming home from work, followed by 3-4-5 glasses of wine. Weekends were getting out of control, not remembering conversations. I managed to hide it brilliantly, and no one in my family ever suspected just how much I drank. The not remembering things really started freaking me out.
    I decided to give Whole30 a try, since a close friend wanted a "buddy" to do it with her. I was also intrigued by the science of it, so I figured what the heck. It'll only last a day or two anyway, and I'll just lie to my friend about the alcohol, and eat the right food.
    The night before I started, I had a long talk with myself at 2 a.m., since I never, ever sleep well. I truly hate myself, realize that my health is going to be affected, and I'm missing time with my family by being in a stupor. I can do this. I can give up the booze.
    Call it divine intervention, straight up Dutch stubbornness, whatever, but I have not had a drink in 13 days. The booze is all still in the house, and I will pour my husband a glass of wine with dinner, but I have no desire whatsoever to have a drink. I NEVER thought I could do this. I sleep so much better, my hot flashes have diminished (I'm 53), I remember every conversation, if I say something dumb it's not alcohol fueled, but, most importantly, I don't hate myself anymore.
    I feel like I have been given a new lease on life. I know there are many people out there who struggle as I did, and I want them to know there are kind, listening ears that won't condemn or judge. I am reading It Starts With Food, and replacing Frankenfood with alcohol. Makes total sense when you understand the science.
    Thanks for having this forum. Just writing this has been hugely cathartic. Life is beautiful.
  12. Like
    Karen reacted to Bulkychameleon in Whole30 and endometriosis and adenomyosis   
    Hi Karen - this is great information! I'll definitely do some searching and see what I can find in my area. It's encouraging to hear how much this has helped you. 
    The food sensitivity testing was interesting; a lot of low grade sensitivities with the usual culprits: gluten, dairy, etc. Also some surprising ones: green tea, walnuts, cranberries, etc. This will definitely help me tweak where needed. 
    Thanks again!  
  13. Like
    Karen reacted to Ash in the Mountains in Whole30 & Trying To Conceive   
    Hey ladies, I just wanted to update you all to say that Whole30 worked for me! I actually did a Whole60, as I thought it would take me more than the one cycle to get my hormones regulated. Only 3 days after finishing, I conceived! I definitely think Whole30 worked. I had been charting cervical fluid, basal body temperature, OPKs, the works. I was concerned that I was seeing very little fertile cervical fluid, and my temperatures seemed very low (mid 96's). The cycle during the second half of my Whole60 I had classic fertile cervical fluid for the first time. I also lost 13 pounds, so I am starting this pregnancy at a better weight than I would have without Whole30  Feeling happy!
  14. Like
    Karen reacted to wholemhk in Whole30 after a Miscarriage?   
    Thats an amazing story about your sister! I think I'm finally ready to start a Whole30 soon.  I thought I would be ready right away, to take my mind off the anger I was experiencing, but I quickly realized I wasn't in the right mindset just yet.  My doctor suggested testing my vitamin D levels, and they came back very low, so she has me taking 2,000 IU/day.  I've read that low levels of vitamin D could be cause for miscarriage but there's really no way of knowing if that's what caused mine.  Hoping I can get my levels up to a healthy amount before conceiving again! I heard it can take a while, so fingers crossed! 
  15. Like
    Karen reacted to Mfduds02 in Whole30 & Trying To Conceive   
    My husband and I have been TTC for two years with two miscarriages. We're hoping our Whole30 helps us get a baby. We started shortly after I finished my first period following the second pregnancy loss and D & C. I was very disappointed that I didn't receive a positive OPKthis past cycle, but I still started right on time yesterday. Day 19 of Whole30 is almost over, I'm hoping the fertility timing works out better for this next cycle. We're feeling much better: healthy and rejuvenated. I'm also using Femara prescribed by my midwife. Crossing fingers for all of us!
  16. Like
    Karen reacted to Mfduds02 in Whole30 after a Miscarriage?   
    I know there's nothing anyone can do or say to ease the pain from loss like that, but I'm so sorry and you're not alone.
    I'm finishing day 19 of my first Whole30 after two years TTC and two miscarriages. No pregnancy yet, but I feel so much better! I can tell that my body is resetting and getting healthier. My husband is doing this with me and we can only hope it helps us get a successful, fullterm pregnancy. We want a baby! Regardless, this has been a great way to focus on getting healthy in multiple ways, healing and doing something to bring us closer together after our losses and trying times.
    My sister has PCOS and has struggled with miscarriages and infertility as well. She and her husband decided to try for another baby soon after she did one of her Whole30s. It was the first time her cycle was regular in years and they conceived their first month trying! I'm crossing our fingers it will happen for us.
    I would definitely recommend doing Whole30 to recooperate from miscarriage and try to get back on track. Of course, no one can tell you what you need to recover. Do whatever you feel is best for you. Good luck!
  17. Like
    Karen got a reaction from Annie Schunior in Hormonal Cravings   
    Yup, PMS will lead to cravings. Your body needs a LOT more nutrients during the second half of your cycle. It has to assume you're pregnant and ramps up the body to prep for that. Once you get your period, your body doesn't need as much and the cravings subside.
    Most do well eating lots more compliant carbs during this time. Eat more in general, but get more carbs in. More fat may help, too. I've read a chocolate craving may be specific to a magnesium need, so consider magnesium rich foods or supplements. 
    Just know that this is biology and survival of the species at work here. Work with it. It's not a willpower issue, as we've often been led to believe when it comes to PMS.
  18. Like
    Karen reacted to wholemhk in Whole30 after a Miscarriage?   
    Thanks for all of your responses ladies! Still debating if I will do a whole30; I want to make sure I'm in the right frame of mind first.  Slowly getting there! 
  19. Like
    Karen got a reaction from awarner in Whole30 after a Miscarriage?   
    It absolutely has. It hasn't been a cure by any means, but when I eat well, my symptoms are significantly less. If I fall off the wagon, they flair up again. I swore off pain meds and hormones a few months after an unsuccessful surgery in 2009 and haven't looked back. I wasn't sure I'd be able to get pregnant after all I've been through, and my loss was certainly a huge setback, but I'm proud to say my endo is much better because I've taken control of my health. 
  20. Like
    Karen reacted to littleg in Whole30 after a Miscarriage?   
    I posted a bit on here last year about my m/c at 10 weeks. It was one of the hardest things I've ever gone through.  I ate my way through my feelings for a while and then eventually was able to string together what I think may have been a W60.  Eating real foods will certainly never decrease your chances of regulating your cycle or conceiving and it is probably the *best* thing you can do for *you* - so if you feel like you have the time and energy to devote to it - go for it!
    And don't blame yourself at all for the m/c.  When embryos are viable it takes a heck of a lot to end a pregnancy... so an early pregnancy loss is almost certainly not related to anything mom did or didn't do.  So don't feel like you need to "fix" anything.  
    I was in fertility treatments so I was getting hcg measurements (took a while for it to be negative - I think I even got a period before it was <5) and ultrasounds as we waited to try again.  The staff at the fertility clinic told us we could start trying on our own right away - that all that "wait for 6 months stuff" is not true and more based on waiting for the woman to be emotionally ok to try again.  However, they wouldn't use meds until my labs and U/S were ok.
    BUT... after 18 months of trying  with infertility treatments for maybe ~8 cycles... we just stopped trying for 2 months.  And then this happened

    So hang in there  Feed your body well, treat yourself well and enjoy the process of trying to make a baby... and I hope in a year from now you aren't getting any sleep either  
  21. Like
    Karen reacted to awarner in Whole30 after a Miscarriage?   
    Wholemhk, I'm am so sorry for your loss.  I too had a missed miscarriage early this fall - we found out we were pregnant with twins that ended in two blighted ovums - heartbroken doesn't even begin to describe the emotions I went through.  Very difficult time for me and my hormones definitely stayed out of whack for a while, which just intensifies all of those feelings.  I had a D&C so my experience might be different from yours but i didn't get my period back until after taking Progesterone(I believe) end of November early December.  Even then it took my cycle a little time to return to normal - got my first period and then two weeks later got it again - now I seem to be back on track but it's only been two months so I'm also hoping a benefit of the Whole30 will be to help my body/cycles return back to normal.  I honestly think taking 30  + days to focus on your wellness is a wonderful idea right now, you need time to heal and reflect and care for yourself and this seems like the perfect way to do that.  Would love to follow along with you if you do decide to do a Whole30 - I am only 6 days in so we could keep eachother motivated!  Wishing you all the best!  - Amy
  22. Like
    Karen reacted to wholemhk in Whole30 after a Miscarriage?   
    Thank you so much for your response.  I definitely plan on waiting until I have a period before trying again, which is what my doctor also recommended.  I'm hoping that by starting a Whole30 it will help bring on my period in a relatively normal time frame, since I'm worried it will take forever due to the miscarriage.  I already have long cycles to begin with, which makes TTC tricky.  I'm also super anxious about this happening again, and desperately want to try to "fix" what went wrong, even though I was told it was nothing I did.  I'm sorry to hear that you went through this too.  It's encouraging to hear you conceived again shortly after...it gives me hope! 
  23. Like
    Karen reacted to FairyL0u in Hormonal Cravings   
    I just found this thread whilst browsing the forums... it's a week until period time for me and I am ravenous - no surprise really, that happens every month but today I have decided to eat LOTS of nutritious compliant food to see what happens. I've effectively consumed an additional meal and am stuffed, but now not craving sweet things and (if I was counting) only really ate an extra 400-500 calories worth of food, a massive win compared to what would have happened if I'd chosen processed grain based things instead. I've eaten extra potatoes and a chicken breast I wouldn't have ordinarily wanted but otherwise today was much as yesterday
  24. Like
    Karen got a reaction from Annie Schunior in Whole30 & Trying To Conceive   
    I have longer cycles, too, and find that if I start a Whole30 prior to ovulation, ovulation is delayed... So now, I know to start after ovulation, and by the time I'm set to ovulate again, my body has figured out it's safe to ovulate. (Any sort of perceived stress has the potential to delay ovulation. The body doesn't want to get pregnant then because it has a lower risk of bringing the baby to term. Think caveman days... periods of no food / water are not ideal for sustaining life. Thus, significant diet changes can cause the body to pause.  Survival of the species at its best.)
    I've gotten pregnant 2 times, both after a Whole 30. Maybe it's related, maybe it's not. But, I found several other ladies on my current birth board that had the same experience.  Your body and baby need nutrient dense foods to stay healthy, so why not start now? Maybe it'll help your body think conditions are great for an easy conception.
  25. Like
    Karen got a reaction from Annie Schunior in Hormonal Cravings   
    Yup, PMS will lead to cravings. Your body needs a LOT more nutrients during the second half of your cycle. It has to assume you're pregnant and ramps up the body to prep for that. Once you get your period, your body doesn't need as much and the cravings subside.
    Most do well eating lots more compliant carbs during this time. Eat more in general, but get more carbs in. More fat may help, too. I've read a chocolate craving may be specific to a magnesium need, so consider magnesium rich foods or supplements. 
    Just know that this is biology and survival of the species at work here. Work with it. It's not a willpower issue, as we've often been led to believe when it comes to PMS.