Karen

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  1. Like
    Karen got a reaction from sboavida in Started Whole30 and My Period is Early/Late   
    One of our members, @Karen, wrote up this explanation a while back of why your period may have come early or late during (usually) your first Whole30. I thought it was far too good to let it be lost in the depths of the forum so I've pinned it to the top of the Ladies Only section. Hopefully if you're a little nervous or worried about your early or "missing" period, this will help explain what may be happening. As with all things on this forum, no one here is medically trained and this information is not meant to be taken as medical advice. If you are nervous or concerned, please see your doctor. ~ Ladyshanny
     
    Here's my synopsis of it all - someone else can chime in if I'm not 100% or if there's more to the story... I'm going off memory and not consulting my sources for the fine details. My cycles used to be all over the place and I took the time to figure it all out, but I'm going by memory here... This applies to those that AREN'T on hormonal birth control.
    Although we tend to think of our cycles in terms of our actual period, ovulation actually runs the show. From the time you have your period until you ovulate, estrogen is dominant. Once your FSH and estrogen levels reach a peak level, your body decides, "hey, I can ovulate now". For most people, this takes about 14 days from the first day of our period to happen, but for some, it can take much longer. Things like stress (eh hem, diet changes!, stress from work/relationships, car accident, etc.) can actually prevent ovulation for a little bit while your body figures out what's going on. After all, it doesn't want to allow you to get pregnant while the body is under stress, so it holds onto that egg until it knows all is well.
    However, once you ovulate, your body has a finite amount of time until you'll get your period. For most, that's 12-14 days. From ovulation until your period, progesterone is dominant. Your progesterone levels raise until it realizes your body isn't pregnant, and then when your progesterone levels drop, that prompts your period, and it starts all over again. Got it? (Interesting side note - progesterone actually causes your body temp to rise. That's why people TTC and trying NOT TC take their temps. When temps rise, you've ovulated, and when it drops, you can expect your period within a day or two.)
     
    If you just started a Whole30 and your period is late, it's quite likely that ovulation was delayed due to stress. You'll still have about 12-14 days from ovulation until your period, so delayed ovulation means delayed period. Granted, there could be other reasons, but if you were completely regular your entire life and all of a sudden this threw things for a loop, that's a possible explanation. That's how it typically is for me. Another reason is that for those that are estrogen-dominant, you may not have as much progesterone, so instead of getting that 12-14 days between your period and ovulation, you might normally, for example, only 8 days. But when you change your diet and balance your hormones, poof, your progesterone levels kick in and you may get a few more good days between ovulation and your period! For those TTC, that's super important. But if you're just counting the days from your last period, it may seem a bit late.
    For those of you that end up with your period earlier than expected while on a Whole30, there can be a few possible theories, but they all depend on where you are in your cycle and where your hormones are at. If your body has been trying to ovulate but it's taking longer than normal due to perceived stress, your endometrium is still thickening that whole time, and your body may need to release some of it (spotting). Your body could even say, "screw it, there's no way we're ovulating this month!" and your period could start without even ovulating (that's an annovulatory cycle). If you've already ovulated and your hormones are in flux, perhaps your progesterone levels have dropped temporarily, which means your period starts sooner than normal instead of getting those 12-14 days between ovulation and your period. I'm sure there are other reasons, but those are my best guesses for those that are curious.
    Rest assured, at some point, your body will figure out that the diet changes are actually a good thing. Typically within a cycle or two, estrogen and progesterone will balance out how they should, your luteal phase (between ovulation and your period) will be the appropriate length, and all is well in the world. For those that are concerned about TTC, I HIGHLY recommend Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Wexler. She explains all this, how to track your cycles (that's the only way I could make sense of my goofy cycles for a while), and how you can correct any oddballs that you run into!
  2. Like
    Karen got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    I almost always have delayed ovulation if I start a Whole 30 before I ovulate, even if I was following pretty closely prior. I start them after ovulation now! Diet changes can throw the body for a loop... And the body is smart enough not to get pregnant when there are fast changes (think drought, famine back in caveman days), so ovulation can be delayed until it figures out conditions are safe for a possible pregnancy. Make sure you're eating plenty, and getting plenty of fat. Eventually, your body will realize conditions are great for conception and you'll ovulate. 
  3. Like
    Karen got a reaction from sboavida in Started Whole30 and My Period is Early/Late   
    One of our members, @Karen, wrote up this explanation a while back of why your period may have come early or late during (usually) your first Whole30. I thought it was far too good to let it be lost in the depths of the forum so I've pinned it to the top of the Ladies Only section. Hopefully if you're a little nervous or worried about your early or "missing" period, this will help explain what may be happening. As with all things on this forum, no one here is medically trained and this information is not meant to be taken as medical advice. If you are nervous or concerned, please see your doctor. ~ Ladyshanny
     
    Here's my synopsis of it all - someone else can chime in if I'm not 100% or if there's more to the story... I'm going off memory and not consulting my sources for the fine details. My cycles used to be all over the place and I took the time to figure it all out, but I'm going by memory here... This applies to those that AREN'T on hormonal birth control.
    Although we tend to think of our cycles in terms of our actual period, ovulation actually runs the show. From the time you have your period until you ovulate, estrogen is dominant. Once your FSH and estrogen levels reach a peak level, your body decides, "hey, I can ovulate now". For most people, this takes about 14 days from the first day of our period to happen, but for some, it can take much longer. Things like stress (eh hem, diet changes!, stress from work/relationships, car accident, etc.) can actually prevent ovulation for a little bit while your body figures out what's going on. After all, it doesn't want to allow you to get pregnant while the body is under stress, so it holds onto that egg until it knows all is well.
    However, once you ovulate, your body has a finite amount of time until you'll get your period. For most, that's 12-14 days. From ovulation until your period, progesterone is dominant. Your progesterone levels raise until it realizes your body isn't pregnant, and then when your progesterone levels drop, that prompts your period, and it starts all over again. Got it? (Interesting side note - progesterone actually causes your body temp to rise. That's why people TTC and trying NOT TC take their temps. When temps rise, you've ovulated, and when it drops, you can expect your period within a day or two.)
     
    If you just started a Whole30 and your period is late, it's quite likely that ovulation was delayed due to stress. You'll still have about 12-14 days from ovulation until your period, so delayed ovulation means delayed period. Granted, there could be other reasons, but if you were completely regular your entire life and all of a sudden this threw things for a loop, that's a possible explanation. That's how it typically is for me. Another reason is that for those that are estrogen-dominant, you may not have as much progesterone, so instead of getting that 12-14 days between your period and ovulation, you might normally, for example, only 8 days. But when you change your diet and balance your hormones, poof, your progesterone levels kick in and you may get a few more good days between ovulation and your period! For those TTC, that's super important. But if you're just counting the days from your last period, it may seem a bit late.
    For those of you that end up with your period earlier than expected while on a Whole30, there can be a few possible theories, but they all depend on where you are in your cycle and where your hormones are at. If your body has been trying to ovulate but it's taking longer than normal due to perceived stress, your endometrium is still thickening that whole time, and your body may need to release some of it (spotting). Your body could even say, "screw it, there's no way we're ovulating this month!" and your period could start without even ovulating (that's an annovulatory cycle). If you've already ovulated and your hormones are in flux, perhaps your progesterone levels have dropped temporarily, which means your period starts sooner than normal instead of getting those 12-14 days between ovulation and your period. I'm sure there are other reasons, but those are my best guesses for those that are curious.
    Rest assured, at some point, your body will figure out that the diet changes are actually a good thing. Typically within a cycle or two, estrogen and progesterone will balance out how they should, your luteal phase (between ovulation and your period) will be the appropriate length, and all is well in the world. For those that are concerned about TTC, I HIGHLY recommend Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Wexler. She explains all this, how to track your cycles (that's the only way I could make sense of my goofy cycles for a while), and how you can correct any oddballs that you run into!
  4. Like
    Karen got a reaction from sboavida in Started Whole30 and My Period is Early/Late   
    One of our members, @Karen, wrote up this explanation a while back of why your period may have come early or late during (usually) your first Whole30. I thought it was far too good to let it be lost in the depths of the forum so I've pinned it to the top of the Ladies Only section. Hopefully if you're a little nervous or worried about your early or "missing" period, this will help explain what may be happening. As with all things on this forum, no one here is medically trained and this information is not meant to be taken as medical advice. If you are nervous or concerned, please see your doctor. ~ Ladyshanny
     
    Here's my synopsis of it all - someone else can chime in if I'm not 100% or if there's more to the story... I'm going off memory and not consulting my sources for the fine details. My cycles used to be all over the place and I took the time to figure it all out, but I'm going by memory here... This applies to those that AREN'T on hormonal birth control.
    Although we tend to think of our cycles in terms of our actual period, ovulation actually runs the show. From the time you have your period until you ovulate, estrogen is dominant. Once your FSH and estrogen levels reach a peak level, your body decides, "hey, I can ovulate now". For most people, this takes about 14 days from the first day of our period to happen, but for some, it can take much longer. Things like stress (eh hem, diet changes!, stress from work/relationships, car accident, etc.) can actually prevent ovulation for a little bit while your body figures out what's going on. After all, it doesn't want to allow you to get pregnant while the body is under stress, so it holds onto that egg until it knows all is well.
    However, once you ovulate, your body has a finite amount of time until you'll get your period. For most, that's 12-14 days. From ovulation until your period, progesterone is dominant. Your progesterone levels raise until it realizes your body isn't pregnant, and then when your progesterone levels drop, that prompts your period, and it starts all over again. Got it? (Interesting side note - progesterone actually causes your body temp to rise. That's why people TTC and trying NOT TC take their temps. When temps rise, you've ovulated, and when it drops, you can expect your period within a day or two.)
     
    If you just started a Whole30 and your period is late, it's quite likely that ovulation was delayed due to stress. You'll still have about 12-14 days from ovulation until your period, so delayed ovulation means delayed period. Granted, there could be other reasons, but if you were completely regular your entire life and all of a sudden this threw things for a loop, that's a possible explanation. That's how it typically is for me. Another reason is that for those that are estrogen-dominant, you may not have as much progesterone, so instead of getting that 12-14 days between your period and ovulation, you might normally, for example, only 8 days. But when you change your diet and balance your hormones, poof, your progesterone levels kick in and you may get a few more good days between ovulation and your period! For those TTC, that's super important. But if you're just counting the days from your last period, it may seem a bit late.
    For those of you that end up with your period earlier than expected while on a Whole30, there can be a few possible theories, but they all depend on where you are in your cycle and where your hormones are at. If your body has been trying to ovulate but it's taking longer than normal due to perceived stress, your endometrium is still thickening that whole time, and your body may need to release some of it (spotting). Your body could even say, "screw it, there's no way we're ovulating this month!" and your period could start without even ovulating (that's an annovulatory cycle). If you've already ovulated and your hormones are in flux, perhaps your progesterone levels have dropped temporarily, which means your period starts sooner than normal instead of getting those 12-14 days between ovulation and your period. I'm sure there are other reasons, but those are my best guesses for those that are curious.
    Rest assured, at some point, your body will figure out that the diet changes are actually a good thing. Typically within a cycle or two, estrogen and progesterone will balance out how they should, your luteal phase (between ovulation and your period) will be the appropriate length, and all is well in the world. For those that are concerned about TTC, I HIGHLY recommend Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Wexler. She explains all this, how to track your cycles (that's the only way I could make sense of my goofy cycles for a while), and how you can correct any oddballs that you run into!
  5. Like
    Karen got a reaction from sboavida in Started Whole30 and My Period is Early/Late   
    One of our members, @Karen, wrote up this explanation a while back of why your period may have come early or late during (usually) your first Whole30. I thought it was far too good to let it be lost in the depths of the forum so I've pinned it to the top of the Ladies Only section. Hopefully if you're a little nervous or worried about your early or "missing" period, this will help explain what may be happening. As with all things on this forum, no one here is medically trained and this information is not meant to be taken as medical advice. If you are nervous or concerned, please see your doctor. ~ Ladyshanny
     
    Here's my synopsis of it all - someone else can chime in if I'm not 100% or if there's more to the story... I'm going off memory and not consulting my sources for the fine details. My cycles used to be all over the place and I took the time to figure it all out, but I'm going by memory here... This applies to those that AREN'T on hormonal birth control.
    Although we tend to think of our cycles in terms of our actual period, ovulation actually runs the show. From the time you have your period until you ovulate, estrogen is dominant. Once your FSH and estrogen levels reach a peak level, your body decides, "hey, I can ovulate now". For most people, this takes about 14 days from the first day of our period to happen, but for some, it can take much longer. Things like stress (eh hem, diet changes!, stress from work/relationships, car accident, etc.) can actually prevent ovulation for a little bit while your body figures out what's going on. After all, it doesn't want to allow you to get pregnant while the body is under stress, so it holds onto that egg until it knows all is well.
    However, once you ovulate, your body has a finite amount of time until you'll get your period. For most, that's 12-14 days. From ovulation until your period, progesterone is dominant. Your progesterone levels raise until it realizes your body isn't pregnant, and then when your progesterone levels drop, that prompts your period, and it starts all over again. Got it? (Interesting side note - progesterone actually causes your body temp to rise. That's why people TTC and trying NOT TC take their temps. When temps rise, you've ovulated, and when it drops, you can expect your period within a day or two.)
     
    If you just started a Whole30 and your period is late, it's quite likely that ovulation was delayed due to stress. You'll still have about 12-14 days from ovulation until your period, so delayed ovulation means delayed period. Granted, there could be other reasons, but if you were completely regular your entire life and all of a sudden this threw things for a loop, that's a possible explanation. That's how it typically is for me. Another reason is that for those that are estrogen-dominant, you may not have as much progesterone, so instead of getting that 12-14 days between your period and ovulation, you might normally, for example, only 8 days. But when you change your diet and balance your hormones, poof, your progesterone levels kick in and you may get a few more good days between ovulation and your period! For those TTC, that's super important. But if you're just counting the days from your last period, it may seem a bit late.
    For those of you that end up with your period earlier than expected while on a Whole30, there can be a few possible theories, but they all depend on where you are in your cycle and where your hormones are at. If your body has been trying to ovulate but it's taking longer than normal due to perceived stress, your endometrium is still thickening that whole time, and your body may need to release some of it (spotting). Your body could even say, "screw it, there's no way we're ovulating this month!" and your period could start without even ovulating (that's an annovulatory cycle). If you've already ovulated and your hormones are in flux, perhaps your progesterone levels have dropped temporarily, which means your period starts sooner than normal instead of getting those 12-14 days between ovulation and your period. I'm sure there are other reasons, but those are my best guesses for those that are curious.
    Rest assured, at some point, your body will figure out that the diet changes are actually a good thing. Typically within a cycle or two, estrogen and progesterone will balance out how they should, your luteal phase (between ovulation and your period) will be the appropriate length, and all is well in the world. For those that are concerned about TTC, I HIGHLY recommend Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Wexler. She explains all this, how to track your cycles (that's the only way I could make sense of my goofy cycles for a while), and how you can correct any oddballs that you run into!
  6. Like
    Karen got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    I almost always have delayed ovulation if I start a Whole 30 before I ovulate, even if I was following pretty closely prior. I start them after ovulation now! Diet changes can throw the body for a loop... And the body is smart enough not to get pregnant when there are fast changes (think drought, famine back in caveman days), so ovulation can be delayed until it figures out conditions are safe for a possible pregnancy. Make sure you're eating plenty, and getting plenty of fat. Eventually, your body will realize conditions are great for conception and you'll ovulate. 
  7. Like
    Karen got a reaction from sboavida in Started Whole30 and My Period is Early/Late   
    One of our members, @Karen, wrote up this explanation a while back of why your period may have come early or late during (usually) your first Whole30. I thought it was far too good to let it be lost in the depths of the forum so I've pinned it to the top of the Ladies Only section. Hopefully if you're a little nervous or worried about your early or "missing" period, this will help explain what may be happening. As with all things on this forum, no one here is medically trained and this information is not meant to be taken as medical advice. If you are nervous or concerned, please see your doctor. ~ Ladyshanny
     
    Here's my synopsis of it all - someone else can chime in if I'm not 100% or if there's more to the story... I'm going off memory and not consulting my sources for the fine details. My cycles used to be all over the place and I took the time to figure it all out, but I'm going by memory here... This applies to those that AREN'T on hormonal birth control.
    Although we tend to think of our cycles in terms of our actual period, ovulation actually runs the show. From the time you have your period until you ovulate, estrogen is dominant. Once your FSH and estrogen levels reach a peak level, your body decides, "hey, I can ovulate now". For most people, this takes about 14 days from the first day of our period to happen, but for some, it can take much longer. Things like stress (eh hem, diet changes!, stress from work/relationships, car accident, etc.) can actually prevent ovulation for a little bit while your body figures out what's going on. After all, it doesn't want to allow you to get pregnant while the body is under stress, so it holds onto that egg until it knows all is well.
    However, once you ovulate, your body has a finite amount of time until you'll get your period. For most, that's 12-14 days. From ovulation until your period, progesterone is dominant. Your progesterone levels raise until it realizes your body isn't pregnant, and then when your progesterone levels drop, that prompts your period, and it starts all over again. Got it? (Interesting side note - progesterone actually causes your body temp to rise. That's why people TTC and trying NOT TC take their temps. When temps rise, you've ovulated, and when it drops, you can expect your period within a day or two.)
     
    If you just started a Whole30 and your period is late, it's quite likely that ovulation was delayed due to stress. You'll still have about 12-14 days from ovulation until your period, so delayed ovulation means delayed period. Granted, there could be other reasons, but if you were completely regular your entire life and all of a sudden this threw things for a loop, that's a possible explanation. That's how it typically is for me. Another reason is that for those that are estrogen-dominant, you may not have as much progesterone, so instead of getting that 12-14 days between your period and ovulation, you might normally, for example, only 8 days. But when you change your diet and balance your hormones, poof, your progesterone levels kick in and you may get a few more good days between ovulation and your period! For those TTC, that's super important. But if you're just counting the days from your last period, it may seem a bit late.
    For those of you that end up with your period earlier than expected while on a Whole30, there can be a few possible theories, but they all depend on where you are in your cycle and where your hormones are at. If your body has been trying to ovulate but it's taking longer than normal due to perceived stress, your endometrium is still thickening that whole time, and your body may need to release some of it (spotting). Your body could even say, "screw it, there's no way we're ovulating this month!" and your period could start without even ovulating (that's an annovulatory cycle). If you've already ovulated and your hormones are in flux, perhaps your progesterone levels have dropped temporarily, which means your period starts sooner than normal instead of getting those 12-14 days between ovulation and your period. I'm sure there are other reasons, but those are my best guesses for those that are curious.
    Rest assured, at some point, your body will figure out that the diet changes are actually a good thing. Typically within a cycle or two, estrogen and progesterone will balance out how they should, your luteal phase (between ovulation and your period) will be the appropriate length, and all is well in the world. For those that are concerned about TTC, I HIGHLY recommend Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Wexler. She explains all this, how to track your cycles (that's the only way I could make sense of my goofy cycles for a while), and how you can correct any oddballs that you run into!
  8. Like
    Karen reacted to ejjetta in Breast Cancer Members?   
    Hi.
    I had breast cancer in 2009, luckily my op removed it totally and 2 clear lymph nodes. Deciding not to do the doctor recommended radiation and medication, I totally changed my diet, lifestyle and self-care attitude and am still here today! The cancer made me stronger and I encourage you to be totally positive in your life. 
     
    Well done on the weight loss as this is something I struggle with. 
     
    Now 56, I am on western medication for High Blood Pressure (Karvea), and Diabetes (Janumet), together with naturals for Keeping Cancer at bay (Meta I-3-C), Hormone Balancing (Femme Oestroplex), Calcium/Magnesium and Zinc as I do not take these up well, Activate Vitamin B (keeping my energy levels up), Digestive Enzymes and Probiotics. Dont think I have missed anything. 
     
    Unfortunately, I do not squeeze walking, riding or swimming into my schedule and would love your thoughts on staying motivated here. Full time work, daughter living away from me has anxiety disorder and unable to work, husband, community activities seem to get prioritised before exercise. I gladly meditate daily though. :-) 
     
    I now do annual Thermal Image testing which is not popular or recommended here. However I have total confidence in the system. Each time I have had mammogram, it leads to ultrasound, biopsy, with no sign of cancer. I have had scars from the first surgery biopsy!. 
     
    Being new to this forum, I will continue with my research. I am considering doing the Auto-immune protocol plan. My target is to get off the western medication asap. 
  9. Like
    Karen got a reaction from sboavida in Started Whole30 and My Period is Early/Late   
    One of our members, @Karen, wrote up this explanation a while back of why your period may have come early or late during (usually) your first Whole30. I thought it was far too good to let it be lost in the depths of the forum so I've pinned it to the top of the Ladies Only section. Hopefully if you're a little nervous or worried about your early or "missing" period, this will help explain what may be happening. As with all things on this forum, no one here is medically trained and this information is not meant to be taken as medical advice. If you are nervous or concerned, please see your doctor. ~ Ladyshanny
     
    Here's my synopsis of it all - someone else can chime in if I'm not 100% or if there's more to the story... I'm going off memory and not consulting my sources for the fine details. My cycles used to be all over the place and I took the time to figure it all out, but I'm going by memory here... This applies to those that AREN'T on hormonal birth control.
    Although we tend to think of our cycles in terms of our actual period, ovulation actually runs the show. From the time you have your period until you ovulate, estrogen is dominant. Once your FSH and estrogen levels reach a peak level, your body decides, "hey, I can ovulate now". For most people, this takes about 14 days from the first day of our period to happen, but for some, it can take much longer. Things like stress (eh hem, diet changes!, stress from work/relationships, car accident, etc.) can actually prevent ovulation for a little bit while your body figures out what's going on. After all, it doesn't want to allow you to get pregnant while the body is under stress, so it holds onto that egg until it knows all is well.
    However, once you ovulate, your body has a finite amount of time until you'll get your period. For most, that's 12-14 days. From ovulation until your period, progesterone is dominant. Your progesterone levels raise until it realizes your body isn't pregnant, and then when your progesterone levels drop, that prompts your period, and it starts all over again. Got it? (Interesting side note - progesterone actually causes your body temp to rise. That's why people TTC and trying NOT TC take their temps. When temps rise, you've ovulated, and when it drops, you can expect your period within a day or two.)
     
    If you just started a Whole30 and your period is late, it's quite likely that ovulation was delayed due to stress. You'll still have about 12-14 days from ovulation until your period, so delayed ovulation means delayed period. Granted, there could be other reasons, but if you were completely regular your entire life and all of a sudden this threw things for a loop, that's a possible explanation. That's how it typically is for me. Another reason is that for those that are estrogen-dominant, you may not have as much progesterone, so instead of getting that 12-14 days between your period and ovulation, you might normally, for example, only 8 days. But when you change your diet and balance your hormones, poof, your progesterone levels kick in and you may get a few more good days between ovulation and your period! For those TTC, that's super important. But if you're just counting the days from your last period, it may seem a bit late.
    For those of you that end up with your period earlier than expected while on a Whole30, there can be a few possible theories, but they all depend on where you are in your cycle and where your hormones are at. If your body has been trying to ovulate but it's taking longer than normal due to perceived stress, your endometrium is still thickening that whole time, and your body may need to release some of it (spotting). Your body could even say, "screw it, there's no way we're ovulating this month!" and your period could start without even ovulating (that's an annovulatory cycle). If you've already ovulated and your hormones are in flux, perhaps your progesterone levels have dropped temporarily, which means your period starts sooner than normal instead of getting those 12-14 days between ovulation and your period. I'm sure there are other reasons, but those are my best guesses for those that are curious.
    Rest assured, at some point, your body will figure out that the diet changes are actually a good thing. Typically within a cycle or two, estrogen and progesterone will balance out how they should, your luteal phase (between ovulation and your period) will be the appropriate length, and all is well in the world. For those that are concerned about TTC, I HIGHLY recommend Taking Charge of Your Fertility by Toni Wexler. She explains all this, how to track your cycles (that's the only way I could make sense of my goofy cycles for a while), and how you can correct any oddballs that you run into!
  10. Like
    Karen got a reaction from Rebekah U in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    Nope, not unrealistic at all! Your period is triggered by a drop in hormones (progesterone). If your hormones drop enough for any reason, bam, your period starts. Diet CAN cause a drop in hormones that fast.
    Based on what you said about potential implantation bleeding, I'll assume you're not on birth control and had already ovulated this month. Had you started the whole 30 earlier in your cycle, your period likely wouldn't have appeared so soon.
    The first time I changed my diet (not paleo at the time - insulin resistance diet), my period started 3 days later and I didn't have a fraction of the normal pain due to endometriosis. It happened that fast. Not the same as what you experienced, but it was a testament to a jump start of the hormone changes!
  11. Like
    Karen got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    A drop in hormones triggers a bleed. Think of the placebo pill in birth control - you stop taking hormones and the drop in hormones - progesterone specifically - triggers the bleed.
    So what causes a drop in hormones when you change your eating habits? A lot. It's not just one thing. It's eating 3 meals a day. It's eating a balanced meal at each meal. It's eliminating processed foods that are rich in crap that confuse our hormones. It's balancing our cortisol and insulin. For some people dairy or soy contribute as they can confuse our hormones. Ultimately, though, the body is all connected and it's a combination of these and many other things that contribute to helping your body work how it's supposed to, with adequate levels of hormones to support health. A temporary drop in hormones is a sign that your body is adjusting accordingly.
  12. Like
    Karen got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    A drop in hormones triggers a bleed. Think of the placebo pill in birth control - you stop taking hormones and the drop in hormones - progesterone specifically - triggers the bleed.
    So what causes a drop in hormones when you change your eating habits? A lot. It's not just one thing. It's eating 3 meals a day. It's eating a balanced meal at each meal. It's eliminating processed foods that are rich in crap that confuse our hormones. It's balancing our cortisol and insulin. For some people dairy or soy contribute as they can confuse our hormones. Ultimately, though, the body is all connected and it's a combination of these and many other things that contribute to helping your body work how it's supposed to, with adequate levels of hormones to support health. A temporary drop in hormones is a sign that your body is adjusting accordingly.
  13. Like
    Karen got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    A drop in hormones triggers a bleed. Think of the placebo pill in birth control - you stop taking hormones and the drop in hormones - progesterone specifically - triggers the bleed.
    So what causes a drop in hormones when you change your eating habits? A lot. It's not just one thing. It's eating 3 meals a day. It's eating a balanced meal at each meal. It's eliminating processed foods that are rich in crap that confuse our hormones. It's balancing our cortisol and insulin. For some people dairy or soy contribute as they can confuse our hormones. Ultimately, though, the body is all connected and it's a combination of these and many other things that contribute to helping your body work how it's supposed to, with adequate levels of hormones to support health. A temporary drop in hormones is a sign that your body is adjusting accordingly.
  14. Like
    Karen got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    A drop in hormones triggers a bleed. Think of the placebo pill in birth control - you stop taking hormones and the drop in hormones - progesterone specifically - triggers the bleed.
    So what causes a drop in hormones when you change your eating habits? A lot. It's not just one thing. It's eating 3 meals a day. It's eating a balanced meal at each meal. It's eliminating processed foods that are rich in crap that confuse our hormones. It's balancing our cortisol and insulin. For some people dairy or soy contribute as they can confuse our hormones. Ultimately, though, the body is all connected and it's a combination of these and many other things that contribute to helping your body work how it's supposed to, with adequate levels of hormones to support health. A temporary drop in hormones is a sign that your body is adjusting accordingly.
  15. Like
    Karen reacted to init2winit in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    I just wanted to chime in to thank Whole30 for changing, yet another, aspect of my life. I went off the pill a little over 3 years ago and have not had a period since. I wouldn't say I ate terribly but I definitely wasn't eating whole foods in a balanced format. I ate grains and incorporated "cheat days" where I would go all out for a meal. I was vegan for a while and can only imagine I wasn't getting all of the nutrients I needed. I started to become very concerned last year when I still had not gotten my period. I also started doing a lot of weight training and HIIT at least 3 days a week. I know I was also eating restrictively to try and see more physical results. My head was totally in the wrong place as far as my health was concerned. My doctor could not figure out what was going on but she said that my estrogen was super low but she didn't know why. She wanted me to get a MRI but I kept putting it off because I just didn't see how that was going to fix my hormonal issues and my insurance doesn't cover it so it would have been super pricey. I did my first Whole 30 last May and I was amazed at what it did for my life. I didn't get my period back but I ate pretty close to the W30 template up until the holidays. I definitely indulged and enjoyed every minute. I decided to do another W30 starting at the beginning of this January for a small reset and, wouldn't you know it, I got my period!!! I was ecstatic. I was considering ceasing all working out to try and get it to return, which really would have bummed me out because it brings me so much joy. I think my hormones were just so out of whack that it took a while for them to regulate and send all of the right signals. I still have an appointment with an endocrinologist in Feb., which I plan on keeping, to get all my hormone levels tested again but I wholeheartedly believe that W30 brought back on my menstrual cycle. So thankful!
  16. Like
    Karen got a reaction from ladyshanny in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    21 days or 84 days doesn't matter. Birth control is birth control. It overrides your hormones for however many days, then you take the placebo, and the drop in hormones triggers your period.
    Early bleeding on the pill is totally common. It doesn't matter how far you are in your cycle as it's an artificial cycle.
  17. Like
    Karen reacted to Shakti in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    Hi, Friends. An update: that period was not a happy surprise, but I do think it was a symptom of a hormonal shift toward balance. I just didn't expect anything like that to happen so quickly. The bleeding was more normal than I've experienced in a year or so -- consistent, no clots, so pauses. On the last day I had a migraine. Not awesome.
    But-- now on day 9 of the Whole30, I feel so good I just had to say something. Like a fresh breeze has blown through my (bodily) home. I mean, I really, really feel good. And not just because I'm not in pain. I feel somehow like I've taken a deep breath with all my muscles. Much less tension everywhere.
    I don't know what the next days will bring, but I'm cool with it. I'm in.
  18. Like
    Karen reacted to Noelle in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    Guess what? It worked!
    My doctor (who is an ND) started me on some supplements, and those plus lots of nutrient-dense foods got my body back on the right track. I've had a normal, easy period once a month for the past four months. Yay!
  19. Like
    Karen got a reaction from ladyshanny in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    The pill doesn't control your cycle - it just maintains your hormones at certain levels to override the rise and fall of hormones that naturally causes ovulation and eventually your period. When you start taking the placebo pills, your body senses the drop in hormones, and that drop in hormones is what causes you to start to bleed.
    That's the same trigger that causes anyone to bleed - pill or not. However, when your own hormones running in the background fluctuate due to changes in food - which is one of the benefits of paleo, your body may sense the same drop in hormones and starts to bleed because that's how our biology works. In a cycle or two, your hormones should settle where they should be and there won't be a that drastic drop again to trigger a bleed.
  20. Like
    Karen got a reaction from ladyshanny in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    The pill doesn't control your cycle - it just maintains your hormones at certain levels to override the rise and fall of hormones that naturally causes ovulation and eventually your period. When you start taking the placebo pills, your body senses the drop in hormones, and that drop in hormones is what causes you to start to bleed.
    That's the same trigger that causes anyone to bleed - pill or not. However, when your own hormones running in the background fluctuate due to changes in food - which is one of the benefits of paleo, your body may sense the same drop in hormones and starts to bleed because that's how our biology works. In a cycle or two, your hormones should settle where they should be and there won't be a that drastic drop again to trigger a bleed.
  21. Like
    Karen reacted to CeeCeeMcGee in Question for Type 2 Diabetics   
    This was certainly informative.  Thank you so much!  I was under the impression that when your body shifts from burning sugar to fat for energy, that the process itself was ketosis.  Shows you how much I know...   
     
    Beginning this journey is the best thing that I've done for myself.  I knew that it would be tough as I am also dealing with some stressful situations on top of trying to eat properly, but I had to commit.  I did speak to my doctor, and he actually suggested that I come off of some of my medications before beginning the Whole 30.  So I've solely been testing after each meal, taking a long acting insulin and Januvia.  I've already been able to cut out two medications completely since my sugars have been within normal with my meal choices. I have only had night spikes. To say that I am psyched doesn't even begin to explain it.
     
    I had set up an August 1st start date, and then 5 days prior found out that my dog has lymphoma and that I would be needing to bring her to Raleigh for treatments every week.  That would leave me having to drive up there and then stay there all day, then drive home.  I didn't think I'd be able to handle the stress as well as follow my meal plans, but my husband was really supportive.  My dear husband that up until August 1st barely would eat a vegetable with his meals.  I am so proud of him and the changes that he is making himself!   Not only have I felt like following the Whole 30 has helped me deal with my stress and give me something else to think about, but the foods that I was eating previously did nothing to make me feel better about myself.   Foods that I have been shoveling into my mouth with abandon since my daughter passed away 20 years ago at the age of 16 months old.  I know that it sounds silly since I am only on day 11, but since starting I feel like I am doing something good for myself for the first time in such a long time.  I've been living in a fog of depression and self loathing that was fueled on by comfort foods, and I feel as though that fog is finally being lifted.
     
    I apologize if that was all TMI.  I have been so stinkin' emotional since I began, and not in a bad way.  
  22. Like
    Karen got a reaction from Rebekah U in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    Nope, not unrealistic at all! Your period is triggered by a drop in hormones (progesterone). If your hormones drop enough for any reason, bam, your period starts. Diet CAN cause a drop in hormones that fast.
    Based on what you said about potential implantation bleeding, I'll assume you're not on birth control and had already ovulated this month. Had you started the whole 30 earlier in your cycle, your period likely wouldn't have appeared so soon.
    The first time I changed my diet (not paleo at the time - insulin resistance diet), my period started 3 days later and I didn't have a fraction of the normal pain due to endometriosis. It happened that fast. Not the same as what you experienced, but it was a testament to a jump start of the hormone changes!
  23. Like
    Karen got a reaction from Mati in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    Whether you're on the pill or not, your period is triggered by a drop in hormones, specifically progesterone. When you stop taking the pill, the body senses the drop and your period begins. However, if there's something that causes your own hormones to shift - because they're still there in the background despite being on the pill - your body will think it's a sign to start bleeding. Typically, once the initial shift has passed, your body has a new normal level to base a drop in hormones and your eventual period on.
  24. Like
    Karen got a reaction from Rebekah U in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    In general, my observations are that women on hormonal BC find their period comes early when they make diet changes.  Women that aren't on hormonal birth control often experience late periods.  Here's a post where I went into detail about why diet changes mess up hormones, both for those on BC and those that aren't: http://forum.whole9life.com/topic/6028-i-just-started-my-period-8-days-early/  I'm very passionate and a little long-winded when it comes to hormones, so my apologies.  
     
    Freelie - I'd suspect your doctor won't have much to say.  Although doctors often recommend diet changes to women with PCOS to help balance hormones and regulate cycles, they typically don't apply that same logic to other populations of women.  As a result, they often don't have an explanation for period changes due to a clean diet...  Most doctors that I've talked to are clueless and think hormones and diet are mutually exclusive.  *smacks forehead.  
     
    To be clear, diet changes like this are not bad for your menstrual cycle.  They really aren't.  The changes may cause different things to happen in your body than they have before, but isn't that the point of eating clean?  To get your body back into balance?  I mean, there's loads of info in ISWF about hormones because of this!  Think of this early period as a sign that things are working out the way they should.  Getting your period early is a hiccup along the way and it won't be permanent!  
  25. Like
    Karen got a reaction from Rebekah U in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    Nope, not unrealistic at all! Your period is triggered by a drop in hormones (progesterone). If your hormones drop enough for any reason, bam, your period starts. Diet CAN cause a drop in hormones that fast.
    Based on what you said about potential implantation bleeding, I'll assume you're not on birth control and had already ovulated this month. Had you started the whole 30 earlier in your cycle, your period likely wouldn't have appeared so soon.
    The first time I changed my diet (not paleo at the time - insulin resistance diet), my period started 3 days later and I didn't have a fraction of the normal pain due to endometriosis. It happened that fast. Not the same as what you experienced, but it was a testament to a jump start of the hormone changes!