scrapstitching

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    scrapstitching reacted to SugarcubeOD in NEW!! Coconut Aminos and Chips   
    NEW WHOLE30 RULES: CHIPS AND COCONUT AMINOS
    27 March, 2017
    From Whole30 headmistress Melissa Hartwig, who works really hard to make the program both effective and easy to follow
    It’s been a long time since I’ve issued any changes to the Whole30 rules; the last was in 2014, when we brought back the white potato. Making a rule change is a really big deal; it’s a huge communication effort to share the new information with millions of people worldwide and update all of our books and resources. But food manufacturers continue to create grain-free, dairy-free products that didn’t exist when I wrote the original Whole30 rules, and frankly, they’re making my job really hard here.
    After much research, discussion with my forum moderators, and consulting the Whole30 team, we concur it’s time to revise a few points, based on the current marketplace. Here are two new Whole30 rules, effective April 1, 2017 (or right now, since you’re reading it). If you want, just read the rules and apply, easy-peasy. If you want to hear the thought process behind the changes, however, I’ll describe in detail below.
    New Whole30 Rules
    No store-bought chips of any origin (potato, tortilla, plantain, coconut, kale…) Coconut aminos are an exception to the “no added sugar” rule (and continue to be permissible on the program)   No more plantain chips on the #Whole30? Spread the word; two NEW Whole30 rules. CLICK TO TWEET
      No Store-Bought Chips
    When we brought white potatoes back in 2014, one sticky issue was, “How do we keep people from eating French fries and potato chips, as those are obviously not in the spirit of the Whole30?” The answer was easy; saying, “No potato chips, and no restaurant or fast-food fries.” Back in 2014, all you could find in the store were potato chips or “Sweets n Beets.”  Kale or broccoli “chips” didn’t exist, tortilla chips were made only with corn, and plantain chips were just showing up on the scene, but not popular enough to be on our radar.
    Over the last few years, the variety of “healthy” chips in stores have exploded. You can now buy “nacho” flavored kale chips, cassava flour tortilla chips, and “roasted” plantain chips containing technically compliant Whole30 ingredients. This has caused great confusion in the community—kale chips must be okay because they’re kale, but what about plantain chips, or those potato chips fried in unrefined coconut oil? It was hard to keep up with; a fact I saw reflected in the #whole30 photos you’re posting on Instagram. In thinking about how to communicate my thoughts on the place of chips on the Whole30, I kept coming back to the central theme: Face-planting into a packaged bag of chips (of any nature) has no place in resetting your health, habits, and relationship with food.
    Especially plantain chips. You know you crack out on them, and news flash: THEY’RE NOT ACTUALLY HEALTHY.
    So, allow us to make it easy for you, and return to our Whole30 “real, whole, nutrient-dense” food roots: No store-bought chips. Period. Not even if they’re kale.  Not even if they’re roasted. Not even if they’re cooked in coconut oil. Chips of any nature are counter to the Whole30 mission, they’re pushing more nutrient-dense food off your plate, and they’re all too easy to turn into food with no brakes.
    It’s only 30 days, and you can do better.
    Feel free to make your own real-food version at home; bake kale leaves, pan-fry plantain slices, or roast potato wedges. But please, no deep-frying. That should go without saying.
    Coconut Aminos
    Coconut aminos (a soy sauce substitute made from coconut) came on the Whole30 scene around 2013. The first company to release the product was Coconut Secret, and the ingredients read, “Organic coconut ‘sap’ aged and blended with sun-dried, mineral-rich sea salt.” Based on this ingredient list*, it appeared totally Whole30 compliant. We began using aminos in our recipes and cookbooks, creating Asian-inspired dishes with exciting flavors.
    Today, we have a variety of aminos; Big Tree Farms is a major market player, and Thrive Market has their own brand of aminos. Trouble is, their ingredients read slightly different: “Organic fair trade coconut blossom nectar, sea salt.” And it’s that one word, “nectar,” that’s causing trouble, because in Whole30 lingo, “nectar” = “sugar.”
    I got on the phone with Elizabeth from Big Tree Farms, so she could explain the way aminos are made. The nectar itself is harvested from the coconut flower blossoms (not the tree itself, as the word “sap” might indicate). From there, you can do a few things with the nectar: brew it down with sea salt and water (natural fermentation may be part of this process) and turn it into aminos; dry it and allow it to granulate, turning it into coconut sugar; or sell it as coconut syrup, a liquid sweetener substitute.
    So technically, all aminos are derived from a sugar source—but not all labels are clear about that. Which means that according to the current rules, some brands of aminos are out, while some are allowed, based solely on the way the companies chose to write the ingredients on the label.
    Furthermore, unlike the other two forms of coconut nectar, aminos are not a sugar substitute.  Would you add it to your coffee or tea, or pour it over berries? (EW.)
    To avoid further confusion, we’re just going to write a new exclusion into the rules: “coconut aminos” are compliant for the program, even if the word “nectar” is on the label.
    *When you read the rest of the Coconut Secret label, the word “sap” is in quotation marks, and the bottle description does say it comes from “sap that exudes from the coconut blossom.” Consumers (myself included) assumed the product came from the tree (or the coconut itself), but it is sourced from the coconut blossom, just like the other brands. 
    Next Steps
    First, these new rules officially go into effect on April 1, 2017. If you’ve been eating ingredient-compliant plantain chips or store-bought kale chips, you don’t have to start over; just stop eating them. (And if you’ve been using aminos of any brand, nothing actually changes.)
    Second, we’d appreciate you helping us share the rules by reposting our Instagram post, sharing our Facebook post, or Tweeting about it (below).
      Have you heard? TWO new #Whole30 rules re: chips and coconut aminos! Details here. CLICK TO TWEET
      Third, we’ve already updated the Can I Have blog post, the Whole30 Program Rules, and the accompanying PDF. We’re also in the process of cleaning up old forum entries with out-of-date info. However, patience, please, as that process could take a while. I’m also working the revisions into immediate reprints of The Whole30 and The Whole30 Cookbook.
    Finally, we’ll be working with our partners at Thrive Market and Barefoot Provisions to remove kale chips from their Whole30 kits. This could take a little while, logistically.
    On behalf of the Whole30 team, thank you for your continued support and your tolerance for these occasional changes. We are always evaluating the rules for their logic, foundation in science, effectiveness, and ease of use. Balancing all of those isn’t always easy, but we think these changes encompass the spirit and intention of the program, while making it even easier for you to follow the rules.
    Even if you’re mad about the plantain chips.
  2. Like
    scrapstitching reacted to Melissa Hartwig in Disclaimer   
    Disclaimer
    Please note, this forum is peer-moderated. Forum moderators are not doctors, licensed health care practitioners, or registered dietitians. The goal of this forum is to provide support, advice, and resources specific to the Whole30 program. We are not able to offer medical advice, nutrition advice, or specific dietary recommendations via this forum. Should you have a question outside of the scope of general Whole30 support, you should contact a Registered Dietitian, medical doctor, trained counselor, or other qualified healthcare provider for specific dietary and health-related recommendations.
    The information presented here is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained in or available through this material is for general information purposes only. Thirty & Co, LLC encourage you to review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician. NEVER DISREGARD PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE OR DELAY SEEKING MEDICAL TREATMENT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ HERE, OR ACCESSED VIA THIS PRESENTED INFORMATION.
    Thirty & Co, LLC is not responsible nor liable for any advice, course of treatment, diagnosis or any other information services or products that you obtain through this material.
    Any information you publish on this site becomes public information. By publishing content or information on this site, you are allowing Thirty & Co, LLC to exhibit, publish or distribute this content for purposes of publicizing Whole30's programs.
    The Whole30® is registered through the USPTO as legally registered trademark of Thirty & Co LLC.
  3. Like
    scrapstitching got a reaction from cjlantier in Approved Sweeteners   
    LRM, on 08 May 2013 - 03:46 PM, said:
    I love plain club soda with frozen fruit instead of ice: peaches, strawberries, blueberries, etc. Delicious and very refreshing.
    I pulverized a tray of raspberries along with some strawberries and the fruit of one lime, then froze the concoction in an ice cube tray. I use them once in a while for a change. They're also good as a cold treat on a super hot day.
  4. Like
    scrapstitching reacted to GFChris in The Official "Can I Have..." Guide to the Whole30   
    According to their FB page, it's water with fruit oil and essences - looks like you're good.
  5. Like
    scrapstitching reacted to GFChris in The Official "Can I Have..." Guide to the Whole30   
    Maltodextrin is not compliant, as it can contain corn, rice, potato starch, barley or wheat.
     
    US Wellness Meats is a source for compliant bacon.
     
    I believe Applegate Organics has a compliant roast beef: no sugar, carrageenan, etc.
  6. Like
    scrapstitching reacted to ABS32013 in The crazy things people say   
    Had a conversation with a dear friend who has spent too many years drinking the Weight Watchers Kool-Aid. She is very interested in how I've changed my eating habits (although, I suspect, too focused on weight loss and not a clean diet and the many other benefits). When I mentioned that I use coconut oil for cooking, she commented on how bad it is for you. A few minutes later, she recounted a tale from a recent trip with her boys to McDonald's. Umm....
    Same friend recently mentioned that the grocery store eggs (i.e., factory-farmed) are "healthier" than the farm eggs because the factory chickens have been bred to produce eggs with less cholesterol.
    This all makes me rather sad, actually. So much bad information out there. I'm not pushing or evangelizing, though. I did have to mention the bit about there being old research out there on hydrogenated coconut oil. I just kept my mouth shut about the eggs.
  7. Like
    scrapstitching got a reaction from Robin Strathdee in Approved Sweeteners   
    ISWF addresses the diet soda thing. We're so addicted to sweeteners that even the fake ones cause the "must have more!" response. Okay, that was sorely paraphrased, but that's what I read. I suspect that I'll have an occasional soda, but on a regular basis, if I want bubbles, it'll be Perrier. Re-introduction scares the bejesus out of me, but I think over these next 29 days, I'll have a better feel for it.
  8. Like
    scrapstitching got a reaction from Robin Strathdee in Approved Sweeteners   
    ISWF addresses the diet soda thing. We're so addicted to sweeteners that even the fake ones cause the "must have more!" response. Okay, that was sorely paraphrased, but that's what I read. I suspect that I'll have an occasional soda, but on a regular basis, if I want bubbles, it'll be Perrier. Re-introduction scares the bejesus out of me, but I think over these next 29 days, I'll have a better feel for it.
  9. Like
    scrapstitching reacted to Melissa Hartwig in The Official Whole30® Program   
    For the most current version of the Whole30 program rules,

    visit http://whole30.com/whole30-program-rules.

  10. Like
    scrapstitching reacted to Melissa Hartwig in Forum Rules   
    Welcome to the Whole30 Forum!

    We are happy you are here, and think you will find this new format ideal for questions, answers and support during your Whole30 program and beyond. Below are the general rules for this forum. We ask that you read them through at least once, and abide by them at all times.

    General Forum Rules
    We run a family-friendly show around here. Please keep language, links and images PG-13; no "f-bombs," links to adult content or any other such things you would not say, read or watch around your kids Keep discussions respectful. We appreciate differing opinions and relish open dialogue, but we ask that you maintain your temper and your respect for others at all times. Do not spam or grossly self-promote in these forums. If you have a blog to share, by all means, link to it in your signature. If you wrote an article appropriate to a particular topic, go ahead and let us know. But keep it tasteful, and please do not use this venue to drum up business for your goods or services.  
    Respect the Copyright!
    Do not post recipes, articles, excerpts, or images from copyrighted materials. That means no copying recipes from The Whole30 or Well Fed into a post, no posting entire paragraphs from It Starts With Food, or posting links to PDFs of e-books you've purchased. These posts violate people's copyright (which is illegal), and it's just a generally disrespectful thing to do. If the item in question is posted freely online, you may copy the recipe or an excerpt from the post, but ONLY IF you provide a link back to the originating website. Posts found to be in violation of these rules will be immediately deleted, and the poster will be warned. Repeat offenders will be banned from the forum. We take this seriously, so please respect people's hard work and original material.  
    Posting Rules

    Before you submit a new question, SEARCH! We aim to keep forum material as streamlined as possible, and chances are your question has been asked (and answered) before. Do not cross-post across categories. Please choose the best category for your query, and post only once. Stay on topic! This forum is currently only for Whole30-related topics. Again, do not post, upload or attach copyright-infringing material which you are not free to redistribute (subject to the licensing terms of the specific item). If you are found to be in violation of these rules, you will either be warned or banned. A ban of your user account may either be temporary or permanent. The administrators and moderators also have the right to edit, delete, move or close any thread or post as they see necessary, without prior warning.

    General Recommendations
    Use a descriptive topic name, so we can answer your questions faster and more effectively. ("Help!" tells us nothing - "Headaches on Day 2, is this normal?" gives us a clearer picture of your issue.) Do not ask for (or expect) personal consulting via this forum. Should we feel your request requires more attention than we can provide in this setting, we will direct you to our consulting options. Welcome new members. Help new folks "learn the ropes" about how to find information and resources, and how to get involved in our Whole30 community. Thank you for your support, and best of luck on your Whole30 program.