Carol

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  1. Like
    Carol got a reaction from kayell in unsweetened iced tea?   
    Another problem with packaged iced teas is how the teas are made. Packaged teas are typically brewed in large batches than spray dried...meaning, they are blown by hot gases until most of the liquid (largely water) evaporates and a powder of the tea remains. This process creates an unfavorable change in how the tea tastes.
    An artificial additive called maltodextrin is often added to the tea powder. Maltodextrin is essentially a set of simple sugars made from processing the heck out of corn starch. It serves two purposes...one is to provide just enough sweetness to the palate to balance off any acrid taste that was accrued by the spray drying of tea. The second is to facilitate mixing the tea in cold water. Maltodextrin sucks up water in to its molecules like a sponge, literally, which helps the tea blend in water.
    The maltodextrin additives provide a particular issue for diabetics as it is absorbed like glucose. And because food manufacturers are essentially allowed by the FDA to tell little white lies about calorie and carb content, it is included in teas (and other products) that may say zero calorie or zero carb on the label. Certainly, there are not a lot of carbs in the unsweetened iced tea -- it is, after all, supposed to taste like unsweetened tea -- they are nonetheless there. They create a glycemic index where there doesn't have to be one.
  2. Like
    Carol got a reaction from Kimberly G in Compliant Coffee Creamer!!   
    Just a suggestion -- there is a brand of coconut milk (and coconut cream) from the Philippines called Aroy-D.  They sell cans of coconut milk.  However, what is more interesting is that they also sell aseptic cartons of coconut milk.  

    There are important differences.  One, the aseptic contain NO additives.  100 percent coconut milk.

    Another -- the very nature of canning cooks the contents of its food for preservation.  The asceptic processing is more high tech and commonly involves the packaging being created and then filled in the same sterile environment. This means the food product going in to the asceptic packaging only needs to be heat pasturized for 5-10 seconds, rather than several minutes.  The science is amazing.

    Since the product does not need prolonged exposure to high heat and pressure, more nutrients are preserved.  Plus, it tastes better.  MUCH better, much fresher.  There is no coconut milk in a can anywhere that tastes as good as this stuff.

    Minor drawback?  The food in aseptic cartons have a shorter shelf life.   So if you're prepping for a zombie apocalypse -- or even a big storm -- don't stash aseptic cartons of coconut milk in the cellar, expecting them to be good 12 months from now.   But if you buy from a store who turns over their stock regularly, it might be good 3-6 months from now.

    Right. Coffee. We were talking about coffee.   I never liked canned coconut miilk in my coffee.  But I LOVE this milk in my coffee.  Sometimes I thin it out with some water or almond milk, but I usually just drink it as is.    It also freezes very well.   

    100% coconut milk, 100% compliance, and delicious.  WIN!!



  3. Like
    Carol got a reaction from Gail Tea in Day 22 and feeling defeated...   

    This is a tough stretch of days!    You see the end, but its still some time away.     So close and yet so far.  The closest I came to quitting was Day 23.     But to know that I came thiiiiiiiiis close to falling off the wagon and DID NOT DO IT has become a major source of strength, even though I still feel a little sheepish about it.  

    You're a realistic person, it seems.  Perhaps one reason why you don't feel successful is that the 30 days isn't up yet.    The goal isn't met, there is still work to be done.

    But you'll get there.   And I bet once you reach the goal you will feel differently.  This is Day 30 for me





     
  4. Like
    Carol reacted to jmcbn in 9 Belfast Bites   
    Tomorrow is St Patrick's Day and as an Irish female, born & bred in Ireland, this is actually my first ever *proper* celebration of the day, joining my mum to watch my RAF Veteran dad parade to the local British Legion where he'll be presented with his shamrock, and then we'll spend the afternoon eating Irish Stew, and listening to Irish folk music, whilst having a wee dram or two.
    There was an alternative invite which was hard to turn down as it it involved Guinnes & treacle GF french toast, with maple cured bacon, cider baked apples, minted whipped cream, toasted pecans & maple syrup, but I know that would have ended badly - to be sure, to be sure - with probably more guinness than toast being consumed...
    You'll note that nowhere have I mentioned corned beef hash, cabbage, or green beer - that's just not how we do things here - and if you really must join us in celebrating our Patron Saint then you should at least try to get his gender right. Patty is a derivative of Patricia. Or a burger. Paddy is the nickname you're after
    So, in honour of our Patron Saint (who happens to be Welsh NOT Irish!), and in celebration of our wonderful ancient culture, please enjoy a little 'Freedom' with Alan Kenefick - one of the absolute best in his field - Happy St Patrick's Day!!
     
     
  5. Like
    Carol reacted to MeadowLily in Did you find yourself sweeter and kinder after Whole30 reintro?   
    I have to go to the DMV today and renew my license. This time, I have to take a million documents to prove I yam who I yam.
    Who are you when no one else is looking.  That's who you really are. 
    Do you round up the carts at the grocery store so they don't hit other peoples vehicles.  I do that.  In doing so,  I hope that someone would do it for me, too. 
    I'm always looking for reckless and loose nails thrown everywhere, I pick those up, too. I want to save someone's tires and mine. It's the little things in life that matter. Helping the older folkaronies out to their car when the parking lot is nothing but a skating rink of ice.  These things matter. 
    Taking a widow a nice plate of your homecooked food while they're sitting alone, watching the evening news. Go above and beyond.    Strikes and Gutters.  Ups and downs.  The Dude Abides.
     
     
  6. Like
    Carol got a reaction from MeadowLily in Sugar sugar everywhere   
    There is sugar in so much stuff that doesn't need sugar!  

    Why does bread have to be sugared up?    Yeast doesn't need THAT much sugar to start reacting.

    And why oh why do ADULTS need Gummy Bear vitamins?
  7. Like
    Carol reacted to MeadowLily in Sugar sugar everywhere   
    Everyone eats fortified gummy bears. It's a throwback to childhood. We no longer want to swallow big vitamin pills. Box meals and dinners.  Just throw in some water, they spring back into life like those instant candy poprocks. 
  8. Like
    Carol reacted to SugarcubeOD in Sugar sugar everywhere   
    One of the mysteries of the world...
  9. Like
    Carol got a reaction from MeadowLily in Sugar sugar everywhere   
    There is sugar in so much stuff that doesn't need sugar!  

    Why does bread have to be sugared up?    Yeast doesn't need THAT much sugar to start reacting.

    And why oh why do ADULTS need Gummy Bear vitamins?
  10. Like
    Carol got a reaction from Kimberly G in Compliant Coffee Creamer!!   
    Just a suggestion -- there is a brand of coconut milk (and coconut cream) from the Philippines called Aroy-D.  They sell cans of coconut milk.  However, what is more interesting is that they also sell aseptic cartons of coconut milk.  

    There are important differences.  One, the aseptic contain NO additives.  100 percent coconut milk.

    Another -- the very nature of canning cooks the contents of its food for preservation.  The asceptic processing is more high tech and commonly involves the packaging being created and then filled in the same sterile environment. This means the food product going in to the asceptic packaging only needs to be heat pasturized for 5-10 seconds, rather than several minutes.  The science is amazing.

    Since the product does not need prolonged exposure to high heat and pressure, more nutrients are preserved.  Plus, it tastes better.  MUCH better, much fresher.  There is no coconut milk in a can anywhere that tastes as good as this stuff.

    Minor drawback?  The food in aseptic cartons have a shorter shelf life.   So if you're prepping for a zombie apocalypse -- or even a big storm -- don't stash aseptic cartons of coconut milk in the cellar, expecting them to be good 12 months from now.   But if you buy from a store who turns over their stock regularly, it might be good 3-6 months from now.

    Right. Coffee. We were talking about coffee.   I never liked canned coconut miilk in my coffee.  But I LOVE this milk in my coffee.  Sometimes I thin it out with some water or almond milk, but I usually just drink it as is.    It also freezes very well.   

    100% coconut milk, 100% compliance, and delicious.  WIN!!



  11. Like
    Carol reacted to jmcbn in Legume reintroduction recation   
    Hey @brittney - assuming the products you tried were compliant it sounds like it could be a histamine response. Legumes contain pretty high levels of histamine, especially peanuts, chickpeas & soy beans - two of which you certainly . Legumes are also histmaine liberators which means they can encourage the release of histamine within the gut - so kind of a double whammy. A histamine reaction (like many food reactions) is a lot to do with tolerance threshold, so with eating legumes at three meals in the one day you may well have just gone over your own personal tolerance threshold. I'd be inclined to let the symptoms subside & re-try individually.
    Do you happen to be celiac or have IBS?
    Soy is a legume, and as such would be fine for legume reintro day unless you wanted to trial soy & peanuts separately as some people do.
  12. Like
    Carol reacted to LauraOC in Cashew Cream Veggie Lasaga?   
    No, this is similar to a cashew cream recipe in the Whole30 book. It's the application. Recreating a creamy, cheesy lasagna.
  13. Like
    Carol got a reaction from Tom Denham in ...Sweet potato starch   
    The noodles are actually not sweet potato, nor are they starch. In Japanese, they plant is konyakku, which typically gets anglicized to konjac. The konjac noodles are often referred to as "yam noodles" because they come from a tuber that is similar to a yam, but is actually a different plant (sweet potatoes are not yams, either)
    The noodles are processed so that they are essentially all fiber...and here's where the trouble lies. The noodle has been processed in to something that is not at all natural to eat. It can cause some digestive trouble. Konjac has been used many years as a way of making a Japanese candy, sweetened with fruit juice. That same candy has caused some folks in North America to suffocate and die (literally)...as it does not dissolve in the mouth from body heat or saliva, it can only be broken down by chewing force. This is why some EU nations have banned Konjac. Your food shouldn't kill you.
  14. Like
    Carol got a reaction from kayell in unsweetened iced tea?   
    Another problem with packaged iced teas is how the teas are made. Packaged teas are typically brewed in large batches than spray dried...meaning, they are blown by hot gases until most of the liquid (largely water) evaporates and a powder of the tea remains. This process creates an unfavorable change in how the tea tastes.
    An artificial additive called maltodextrin is often added to the tea powder. Maltodextrin is essentially a set of simple sugars made from processing the heck out of corn starch. It serves two purposes...one is to provide just enough sweetness to the palate to balance off any acrid taste that was accrued by the spray drying of tea. The second is to facilitate mixing the tea in cold water. Maltodextrin sucks up water in to its molecules like a sponge, literally, which helps the tea blend in water.
    The maltodextrin additives provide a particular issue for diabetics as it is absorbed like glucose. And because food manufacturers are essentially allowed by the FDA to tell little white lies about calorie and carb content, it is included in teas (and other products) that may say zero calorie or zero carb on the label. Certainly, there are not a lot of carbs in the unsweetened iced tea -- it is, after all, supposed to taste like unsweetened tea -- they are nonetheless there. They create a glycemic index where there doesn't have to be one.
  15. Like
    Carol reacted to kayell in ...Sweet potato starch   
    The Korean version are actually made from real sweet potatoes*, not konjac. It's really confusing because konjac gets called yam, and then that gets mistranslated to sweet potato. If it's a Japanese noodle, it's almost certainly konjac. Korean not. Another way to tell is that the Korean sweet potato noodles typically cook into so-called glass or cellophane noodles. Still NOT real food or W30 food, but less likely to destroy your innards.
    *As above after lots of processing.