Carol

Members
  • Content Count

    133
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Carol got a reaction from boyercs in unsweetened iced tea?   
    Another problem with packaged iced teas is how the teas are made. Packaged teas are typically brewed in large batches than spray dried...meaning, they are blown by hot gases until most of the liquid (largely water) evaporates and a powder of the tea remains. This process creates an unfavorable change in how the tea tastes.
    An artificial additive called maltodextrin is often added to the tea powder. Maltodextrin is essentially a set of simple sugars made from processing the heck out of corn starch. It serves two purposes...one is to provide just enough sweetness to the palate to balance off any acrid taste that was accrued by the spray drying of tea. The second is to facilitate mixing the tea in cold water. Maltodextrin sucks up water in to its molecules like a sponge, literally, which helps the tea blend in water.
    The maltodextrin additives provide a particular issue for diabetics as it is absorbed like glucose. And because food manufacturers are essentially allowed by the FDA to tell little white lies about calorie and carb content, it is included in teas (and other products) that may say zero calorie or zero carb on the label. Certainly, there are not a lot of carbs in the unsweetened iced tea -- it is, after all, supposed to taste like unsweetened tea -- they are nonetheless there. They create a glycemic index where there doesn't have to be one.
  2. Like
    Carol got a reaction from Selcazare in Compliant Coffee Creamer!!   
    Just a suggestion -- there is a brand of coconut milk (and coconut cream) from the Philippines called Aroy-D.  They sell cans of coconut milk.  However, what is more interesting is that they also sell aseptic cartons of coconut milk.  

    There are important differences.  One, the aseptic contain NO additives.  100 percent coconut milk.

    Another -- the very nature of canning cooks the contents of its food for preservation.  The asceptic processing is more high tech and commonly involves the packaging being created and then filled in the same sterile environment. This means the food product going in to the asceptic packaging only needs to be heat pasturized for 5-10 seconds, rather than several minutes.  The science is amazing.

    Since the product does not need prolonged exposure to high heat and pressure, more nutrients are preserved.  Plus, it tastes better.  MUCH better, much fresher.  There is no coconut milk in a can anywhere that tastes as good as this stuff.

    Minor drawback?  The food in aseptic cartons have a shorter shelf life.   So if you're prepping for a zombie apocalypse -- or even a big storm -- don't stash aseptic cartons of coconut milk in the cellar, expecting them to be good 12 months from now.   But if you buy from a store who turns over their stock regularly, it might be good 3-6 months from now.

    Right. Coffee. We were talking about coffee.   I never liked canned coconut miilk in my coffee.  But I LOVE this milk in my coffee.  Sometimes I thin it out with some water or almond milk, but I usually just drink it as is.    It also freezes very well.   

    100% coconut milk, 100% compliance, and delicious.  WIN!!



  3. Like
    Carol got a reaction from MeeshKB in Whole30 On the Cheap   
    Be very wary of marketing.

    Scrutinize pricing labels the way you would scrutinize an ingredients list.    Understand the difference between the unit price and the item price, and how they compare.   Don't make assumptions without data.  

    Buy produce from the grocery store's "reduced" section.  Cut away any questionable spots and use the vegetables in soups or curries 

    Watch local grocery stores to see if they mark down cuts of beef or fish as they get close to their expiry date.   A grocery store I don't usually visit does this in their fish department, and the markdowns are often substantial.  The fish often needs to be cooked that night, but the fish is typically half price.  Yes please!

    Visit farmers markets and farm stands.    Many sell produce for cheaper than supermarket prices.  Buy in to a CSA to bring the price even lower.   Share a CSA membership with a friend or family member to bring the cost lower still.   In season, inquire about "seconds".   You may be able to buy a box of blemished vegetables in bulk for substantial savings. 

    Consider buying a side of beef and an inexpensive chest freezer.   You'll pay less for the beef AND the freezer than you would buying that much beef, a pound or two at a time.

    If you make a large purchase, such as a side of beef, ask the butcher if they will offer a small discount, such as 3%, if you pay with cash or a bank check instead of credit card. 

    Use the whole animal.  Buy the whole chicken instead of chicken breasts.    Make stock from the carcass and anything left on the bones.  

    Find a farm that raises grass-fed animals, and inquire about organ meat.  The same farm that sells grass fed filet mignon for $30/lb may sell beef heart, liver, or kidney for $3/lb.  Don't like heart, liver, or kidney?  Dice it small, chop it, or grind it, and add to soups, curries, and chilis.   

    Keep an eye out in the meat department of your grocery store for scrap cuts (ends, etc) of turkey. ham, or similar lean cuts.  Use these in soup, or shave the meats over salad.

    Tell butchers and fishmongers you are on a tight budget and looking for deals.  

    Make friends with folks who hunt or fish on a regular basis. 

    Grow your own, wherever you can, even if its just herb plants in an indoor window box.  
  4. Like
    Carol got a reaction from C. Page in Sauces to use as a fat   
    A good bone broth is a valuable base for a lot of different sauces.    After I make stock, I pour it in to small containers (8-16 ounces) and freeze what I don't use.  I freeze them in small containers so I can defrost 1 container for a sauce, or several containers for soups.    My own stock tends to vary with my whims and what's in my fridge, but there are some excellent recipes on a site dedicated to FODMAP-free eating.   IRemember the importance of using bones from well cared for animals.

    Chicken stock is probably the easiest to make.  Its very convenient.  When I serve a whole chicken, I put a bowl on the table for the bones.  Bones and carcass then go in to the pot for stock.    It is also very versatile.   Its mild flavor blends in with a variety of dishes, whether they are meat-based or plant-based.  

    Brown stock adds a layer of complexity, as the bones need to be roasted before going in to the stock pot.  This what actually gives the brown stock its brown color.

    A common European sauce is sauce espagnole, or  brown sauce.  (Not to be confused with brown stock.)   Brown sauce is made chiefly from aromatic vegetables, and serves as  a base for many European sauces and dishes.  

    One of the finest sauces in the world, demi-glace, is made by combining brown sauce and brown stock.   

    Stock can be made from pork bones as well, although personally I find this to be too high in fat for my tastes.    Refridgerating the stock and removing the layer of fat that rises to the top will remove some fat from the stock, but quite a bit remains incorporated in to the broth -- especially when the bones are chopped to expose the marrow inside. 

    Remember stocks and sauces are just a base.  Add to them and change them about as you like.  
     
  5. Like
    Carol got a reaction from LisaZ in Does anyone else feel nervous about fat?   
    Here, have some.  Fresh ghee I clarified from Contoocook Farm butter.    Its sooooo good!
    In all seriousness, the ghee IS good enough to eat right out of the dish.   But do you think you could eat it all, with that spoon?    I sure couldn't.
    The research in the 80s and 90s was not wrong.  There are lots of fats out there that are NOT good for you.   And fats + starchy carbs = 'food with no brakes' in just about everyone.  How many boxes of Mac and Cheese serve four people?   Kraft says one box serves 4.    Much like 1 pint of Ben and Jerrys seves 4.  
    Who are these mythical 4 people that can share a single box of mac and cheese and a lone pint if ice cream?   I'd like to meat them someday
     
    But good fats combined with protein and good carbs?   Thats a dietary win.    The big bonus?    Fat turns off the haaaangrys.   You will still want to eat, for sure.    But you'll have much fewer "dammit I'm starving!" moments 

  6. Like
    Carol got a reaction from NoMoreCrunchyCravings in Overeating RX Bars   
    A thermos and a small cooler open up lots of options for life on the go!     
  7. Like
    Carol got a reaction from Gail Tea in Day 22 and feeling defeated...   

    This is a tough stretch of days!    You see the end, but its still some time away.     So close and yet so far.  The closest I came to quitting was Day 23.     But to know that I came thiiiiiiiiis close to falling off the wagon and DID NOT DO IT has become a major source of strength, even though I still feel a little sheepish about it.  

    You're a realistic person, it seems.  Perhaps one reason why you don't feel successful is that the 30 days isn't up yet.    The goal isn't met, there is still work to be done.

    But you'll get there.   And I bet once you reach the goal you will feel differently.  This is Day 30 for me





     
  8. Like
    Carol got a reaction from Bellmaestra in O.M.Ghee... Fail.   
    I actually don't use cheese cloth with mine.  I strain my ghee twice through a miracloth -- I think it works much better!
    https://www.amazon.com/Miracloth-All-Purpose-Cloths-Pack-6/dp/B00L1PM9FW/ref=sr_1_1_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1492031588&sr=8-1&keywords=miracloth

    I don't think this name is widely known outside my area.   I've seen them sold in Canada as J Cloth.  I think in other parts of the US they might be called Handy Wipes?  They are usually in the cleaning section of the grocery store but the cloths are untreated.  They can be washed or boiled before use (I boil mine), just make sure you give the cloth a few hours to completely dry before straining your ghee
     
  9. Like
    Carol got a reaction from bethross in Bone soup questions   
    I first make the bone broth, then I pour it in to small (8-12 oz) mason jars without shoulders, and refrigerate overnight.
    As it cools, most of rendered fat will rise to the top and solidify, like a disk.   I then remove the disk of fat with a table knife.   If I use ordinary grocery store bones, I throw it out.   Sometimes the fat from these mass-market meats doesnt even solidify, which disturbs me.
    Meat from the farmstand, I put the disk of fat in to a "snack size" ziploc type bag. The bags I use hold about a cup.   These bags l are not freezer safe, so I stuff the little bags in to a quart size ziploc freezer bag (pic attached) and store in the freezer.    
    I then use the disks of fat in place of cooking oil.  I'll break the disk in half if i don't need to use all of it.   (Pic attached) They add an amazing flavor to a meat sauce or meaty entrée!   Plus using the tallow also offers a bit of a break from "coconut overload" of paleo cooking.  
    Once the broth has cooled, I'll keep a few jars in the fridge and freeze the rest.   If you freeze the broth in a jar, do NOT use a jar with shoulders or any shape that curves inwards towards the center of the jar.   This shape can easily break as the broth freezes and expands.   The jar must be straight up and down, or angle outwards from the center of the jar.
    I like the small jars because I prefer to freeze as much as I can, but still reach for broth whenever I need it -- adding some to sauce, braising liquids for meats, livening up reheated leftovers. The small jars only need a minute or two in the microwave to defrost.
    I absolutely love the gelée created by homemade bone broth and nosh on the gelée as a pre-dinner snack when my BF is late getting home.   I've also enjoyed it as part of my breakfast.  If you like it too, and want to make the gelée from frozen gelatinous broth, it will need to be reheated.   Bring the broth to a boil, then remove from heat.   Pour in to a clean jar and refrigerate overnight, it should gel back up nicely.
     
     


  10. Like
    Carol got a reaction from NoMoreCrunchyCravings in Overeating RX Bars   
    A thermos and a small cooler open up lots of options for life on the go!     
  11. Like
    Carol reacted to ncoughlin in April 13 Start   
    i started (well restarted) yesterday too!!! such a random day. i had planned to start monday but had some family emergencies come up that threw me right off track. I had even done a paleo/whole 30 trial run for the 2 weeks prior. I definitely felt like crap after being off plan for the last week so im glad to be starting again.   i feel you on the scheduling issue... i definitely wanted to do this earlier but had a bachelorette party, wedding, vacation etc that were too close together, so i focused on slowly cleaning up my eating in preparation for the full blown whole 30. Im a little bummed i got derailed immediately and had to start a few days later than planned but it still works out ok.
    good luck!!
    @Carol  are u in NH as in New Hampshire??? me too
  12. Like
    Carol got a reaction from River30 in April 11 Re-Intro Start   
    Damn you, sugar dragons!  

    There's nothing wrong with keeping a dessert for later.  We recently had a pie-themed event (its kind of a family joke).    I was on plan when it occurred, so a few slices of sugary goodness came home with me and were frozen to be enjoyed later.   

    I'm actually looking forward to it.  The gathering was a nice time, and we'll have a chance to remember everyone's hospitality when we enjoy the pie later on.  Maybe after a May hike in the mountains    
  13. Like
    Carol reacted to jmcbn in 9 Belfast Bites   
    Tomorrow is St Patrick's Day and as an Irish female, born & bred in Ireland, this is actually my first ever *proper* celebration of the day, joining my mum to watch my RAF Veteran dad parade to the local British Legion where he'll be presented with his shamrock, and then we'll spend the afternoon eating Irish Stew, and listening to Irish folk music, whilst having a wee dram or two.
    There was an alternative invite which was hard to turn down as it it involved Guinnes & treacle GF french toast, with maple cured bacon, cider baked apples, minted whipped cream, toasted pecans & maple syrup, but I know that would have ended badly - to be sure, to be sure - with probably more guinness than toast being consumed...
    You'll note that nowhere have I mentioned corned beef hash, cabbage, or green beer - that's just not how we do things here - and if you really must join us in celebrating our Patron Saint then you should at least try to get his gender right. Patty is a derivative of Patricia. Or a burger. Paddy is the nickname you're after
    So, in honour of our Patron Saint (who happens to be Welsh NOT Irish!), and in celebration of our wonderful ancient culture, please enjoy a little 'Freedom' with Alan Kenefick - one of the absolute best in his field - Happy St Patrick's Day!!
     
     
  14. Like
    Carol reacted to LauraOC in Frozen green plantain tostones?   
    Thank you so much for your help! I totally missed that they were already fried once! That answers my question right there. I appreciate your attention to detail!
  15. Like
    Carol reacted to MicMD2503 in Frozen green plantain tostones?   
    I made sauteed plantain slices (from fresh, very ripe plantains) as an addition to a dinner this week, they are so easy to make with a bit of coconut oil and a cast iron pan, you can get them as crispy as you like and they are so delicious ! probably better than store-bought plantain chips.
    Just a thought !
  16. Like
    Carol reacted to Bellmaestra in O.M.Ghee... Fail.   
    I had another thought... when I started melting my butter in the crock pot, I kept the lid on it for awhile, then I took the lid off for another hour or so. I wasn't really paying attention. But it's possible that during the time the lid was on, there was condensation that got back into the melted butter. This is a very old crock pot; the kind that heats at a very low temperature; this was from before it was decided that the low temps were unsafe for slow cooking.
    Time to try a new batch; we'll see what happens!
    Thanks again for all the input!
    Stephanie
  17. Like
    Carol got a reaction from Bellmaestra in O.M.Ghee... Fail.   
    I actually don't use cheese cloth with mine.  I strain my ghee twice through a miracloth -- I think it works much better!
    https://www.amazon.com/Miracloth-All-Purpose-Cloths-Pack-6/dp/B00L1PM9FW/ref=sr_1_1_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1492031588&sr=8-1&keywords=miracloth

    I don't think this name is widely known outside my area.   I've seen them sold in Canada as J Cloth.  I think in other parts of the US they might be called Handy Wipes?  They are usually in the cleaning section of the grocery store but the cloths are untreated.  They can be washed or boiled before use (I boil mine), just make sure you give the cloth a few hours to completely dry before straining your ghee
     
  18. Like
    Carol got a reaction from River30 in April 11 Re-Intro Start   
    Damn you, sugar dragons!  

    There's nothing wrong with keeping a dessert for later.  We recently had a pie-themed event (its kind of a family joke).    I was on plan when it occurred, so a few slices of sugary goodness came home with me and were frozen to be enjoyed later.   

    I'm actually looking forward to it.  The gathering was a nice time, and we'll have a chance to remember everyone's hospitality when we enjoy the pie later on.  Maybe after a May hike in the mountains    
  19. Like
    Carol reacted to Alaska Woman in Canned salmon bones   
    Recently made the salmon cakes- yummy hot or cold! The recipe says to remove the bones, but I never do because my mom never did. She figured they were a good source of calcium and the canning gives them a soft/crunchy texture like water chestnuts. Thought I'd just pass this on for whatever it's worth to anyone.
  20. Like
    Carol reacted to laura_juggles in Can I change my carb-loving teen daughter?   
    Have you tried involving her in the meal planning process? If she's taking the initiative to cook for herself when she doesn't eat what you cook, then she could definitely be involved. Maybe ask her if she's seen any recipes on the internet that she'd like to try? (Not even asking her to find a whole30 recipe, just to get her to branch out from nachos and mac) She might not like the idea of being told that she has to follow an eating style that she's had no say in. 
  21. Like
    Carol reacted to ArtFossil in O.M.Ghee... Fail.   
    I've made ghee with every variety of butter from the cheapest to the most expensive. Ordinary butter clarifies and becomes solidified ghee just fine--if one takes the time necessary to both simmer out the water and to solidify the milk solids and if one strains the ghee properly through 4 layers of cheesecloth. (I'm not talking about "butter" which has oil added and therefore isn't really butter, just talking about ordinary cheap store brand butter.)
    But I agree that the container MUST be both clean and dry. 
  22. Like
    Carol got a reaction from ArtFossil in O.M.Ghee... Fail.   
    Not solidifying when it cools means your current batch of ghee has a very different lipid profile than your other batches.      Were you definitely using pastured butter?  Any chance you could be using ordinary butter, or even butter with vegetable oil added?  

    The mold is most likely from water getting in to the vessel that holds your ghee.    The container does need to be clean of course, but it also needs to be very dry.  Air dry the dish in a drying rack overnight if you can.  It takes very little moisture to introduce mold.     If you saw tiny spots today on the top of your ghee, my guess is that is environmental.  If you kept your ghee near the stove on a day that you were cooking, or if you kept it uncovered for a few hours on a humid day, that alone might be enough.
  23. Like
    Carol reacted to ladyshanny in O.M.Ghee... Fail.   
    Chances are two things happened. First, if you didn't cook it long enough, there might've been moisture left in it which would make it liquidey. Putting a wet spoon in to scoop or putting it into a wet jar might've caused the mould too.
  24. Like
    Carol reacted to laura_juggles in Can I have these peas?   
    The little leafy bit makes them really look like garden peas, which are out. 
    For really clear pictures on the differences, I found this article http://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-difference-between-snow-peas-sugar-snap-peas-and-english-peas-ingredient-intelligence-205118
  25. Like
    Carol reacted to nanners in April 11 Re-Intro Start   
    Good ideas from both of you