ShannonM816

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  1. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from KaraS in Starting July 8th and Preparing for All the Suck   
    Good job!
    As far as stress relievers, different things work for different people, so hopefully you'll get lots of suggestions and can find what works for you. For me, I color or draw or do craft things. Sometimes journaling what I'm feeling and thinking about can be helpful. If I can't sleep, especially if it's because I have achy muscles or can't get comfortable, sometimes I take a hot bath to help me relax.
     
  2. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from KaraS in Starting July 8th and Preparing for All the Suck   
    Good job!
    As far as stress relievers, different things work for different people, so hopefully you'll get lots of suggestions and can find what works for you. For me, I color or draw or do craft things. Sometimes journaling what I'm feeling and thinking about can be helpful. If I can't sleep, especially if it's because I have achy muscles or can't get comfortable, sometimes I take a hot bath to help me relax.
     
  3. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from coachmandiep in Day 2 feeling sick and moody   
    Timeline is here:  https://whole30.com/2013/08/revised-timeline/
    Tired and moody is pretty normal the first few days. Be sure you're eating enough, drink lots of water, salt your food, rest when you can. 
    Try peppermint or ginger teas to help with the queasy feeling.
  4. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Laura of The Great White North in Starting July 8th and Preparing for All the Suck   
    There are these:  https://whole30.com/2018/11/walmart/. 
  5. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Darcy18 in Starting July 8th and Preparing for All the Suck   
    New kitchen stuff is fun, and if you've got the budget for it and space in your kitchen for it, go for it -- but please don't feel you need these things. It's easy to look at all the food bloggers and think you need a bunch of gadgets, but you really don't.  Focus on the basics, see what kind of meal prep works for you each week, and then think about which items will work well for you. I say this as someone who has bought some of the cool gadgets, and some of those purchases I'm still happy with, but some were just not as neat as they sounded.
    The meat thermometer is a must for me -- I'm super paranoid about undercooked chicken and pork and use the thermometer all the time to double check that it's really done.  Other than that, if you have pots and pans and knives and cutting boards and storage containers for leftovers, you probably have everything you really need, anything beyond that is bonus. If you want to make your own mayo and other dressings and sauces, an immersion blender is nice, although if you have a regular blender that will also work. Make sure you have a good chef's knife that is comfortable for you to use -- sharpen it if it needs to be sharpened, you're going to be using it a lot -- and at least two cutting boards (one for vegetables, one for raw meats). As far as pots and pans and such, I use my rimmed baking sheets a lot, because I roast a lot of vegetables. I have a big (like 12 inch maybe)  stainless steel straight-sided saute pan that I use for browning ground meat and pan-frying burger patties or chicken pieces, and then two non-stick skillets, the ceramic coated ones, one's probably 10 inch and the other 6 or 8 inches, that are great for eggs and stir-frying vegetables. I have a big soup pot I use a lot in the winter when I cook a big pot of soup pretty much every week. A crockpot can be nice if you already have one, but I don't know that you ought to go buy one if you don't, I suspect that if mine died tomorrow, I wouldn't be in any rush to replace it.
    Those items got me through my first few Whole30s. I have since added a spiralizer (which I hardly ever use, could totally live without), a really nice food processor (I go through phases with this one, sometimes it's faster just to chop the vegetables by hand, but when I do want them more even or want the onions sliced super, super thin, the food processor does a much nicer job than I can do, but it does take a big chunk of counter space), and an Instant Pot (which I used a bunch over the fall and winter, using it to cook a whole chicken almost every week, and then make broth from the carcass, but which I haven't touched in weeks now -- overall, I don't regret buying it, but I could also have lived without it).  
    Obviously, everyone is going to have different opinions, and there's no wrong answer. There are people who use their spiralizers every week and love them and eat lots more vegetables because of them -- that's great! There are  people who depend on their crockpots so they have hot meals ready when they get home from work -- also great! Just, not me. A lot of deciding what you need is figuring out what kind of meal prep you do to fit with your life. If you already cook most of your meals from scratch, you may have a good idea of that, but if you currently do a lot of takeout or even things like sandwiches that don't require a lot of prep on your part, Whole30 may be a huge change and you may not really know what is going to work best for you yet. It is okay to just use what you have and decide later what else would be helpful. 
  6. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from foodmonster in Fat adaptation length of time   
    @Smiall this has a pretty good explanation of fat adaptation:  https://www.marksdailyapple.com/what-does-it-mean-to-be-fat-adapted/. I think it'll answer at least some of your questions. Obviously, come back here and let us know if you still have questions. 
     
  7. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Starlight89 in Starting July 1 - Anyone want to join me?   
    @Starlight89 you might want to bring a vegetable side of some sort that you can have, as most of the things people serve at picnics are going to be full of non-compliant mayo and other ingredients.  Mel Joulwan has a lot of good side salad type dishes -- here's a few:  http://meljoulwan.com/2014/05/21/paleo-summer-salads-potlucks/. The Belly Dance Beet salad is good, and her Sweet & Salty Broccoli salad is good enough that even non-vegetable eaters and non-Whole30 people will like it. 
  8. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Starlight89 in Starting July 1 - Anyone want to join me?   
    @Starlight89 you might want to bring a vegetable side of some sort that you can have, as most of the things people serve at picnics are going to be full of non-compliant mayo and other ingredients.  Mel Joulwan has a lot of good side salad type dishes -- here's a few:  http://meljoulwan.com/2014/05/21/paleo-summer-salads-potlucks/. The Belly Dance Beet salad is good, and her Sweet & Salty Broccoli salad is good enough that even non-vegetable eaters and non-Whole30 people will like it. 
  9. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from AdamzW30 in Starting July 1 - Anyone want to join me?   
    Hi, @AdamzW30 -- there are some new guidelines about pre and post-workout foods that might be helpful for you:  https://whole30.com/2019/02/whole30-pre-workout-post-workout/. If you felt like the previous guidelines were working for you, you could definitely keep following them, but since you mentioned your runs being sluggish before, you might try the new one guidelines and see if it's any better for you. 
  10. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Pandora Black in Drinks and snacks with friends   
    First, remember that a strict whole30 is just 30 days plus your reintroductions, it's not forever and isn't intended to be. Those occasions with friends are where your food freedom will come into play, once your whole30 is over -- then you get to decide if a glass of wine is worth it, or if you'd rather stick to something non-alcoholic, and you get to decide if it's worth it to you to sometimes have non-whole30 foods while you hang out with friends. Sometimes it might be, sometimes it might not, but it will be completely your choice, not some rule that someone else has set for you. Sometimes it is easier when you know you can have these things if you want them, but you decide that you don't. 
    It may help to find things to do that aren't centered around food. For instance, you could go to museums or shows. For me, I met most of my close friends taking craft classes and we still go take classes or hang out and craft. Or you could hike together or enter fun runs or 5ks. Go learn rock climbing or take dance lessons or archery lessons or axe throwing.
    If you do tend to get together for meals or snacks, find places that have foods you can eat, or invite them to your place for a meal or a movie or a game night. If you tend to always go to the same one or two places, see if you can talk to the chef or someone in charge (at a time when they aren't busy), and see if there's something they could come up with for you that would work so there would be something you can order when you do want to have something to eat.
  11. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Darrick in Tomato Paste   
    Yes, this is fine. All fruits and vegetables have naturally occurring sugars, those are fine. What whole30 prohibits is added sugar or sweeteners listed as ingredients. 
  12. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from ChristiHudler in I THOUGHT i was on Day 24... until I read my medication label :(   
    Doctor's orders always trump whole30 rules -- you were prescribed that medication by a doctor, therefore you didn't break any rules taking it. 
  13. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from ChristiHudler in Plated fats - rule?   
    Adding fat is part of the meal template, which is a recommendation. You could do a Whole30 without ever making any meal meet the meal template and as long as you followed the rules, you'd still have done a Whole30 -- but you'll get the best results if you also incorporate the recommendations, including making your meals match the meal template.
    Here's a little more explanation about rules vs. recommendations:  https://whole30.com/2015/01/rules-recommendations/ and the rules are here:   https://whole30.com/whole30-program-rules/. 
     
  14. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from ChristiHudler in plated fats   
    It does count, in that it's a fat, but it rarely ends up being enough. First, many things that you add fat to in cooking, a lot of the fat ends up staying behind in the pan, unless you're making a conscious effort to pour it onto your plate and consume it. Second, if you're cooking multiple servings, you're probably not including multiple servings of oil -- you may add a little extra for 2 servings compared to one serving, but you're probably not completely doubling it, and if you're cooking four servings at once, you're unlikely to be quadrupling your cooking oil, because you really just don't need to. That's why we usually encourage people to include a serving or two of fat, in addition to whatever oil they cook in.
    The real test of whether you're consuming a good amount of fat at each meal is whether you can go 4-5 hours between meals pretty well. If you can, you've got it about right. If you're hungry in two hours, something in your meal is not quite right, and fat is something people often underestimate how much they should have. If you're regularly going 6 hours or more before you start to feel hungry, you might need to cut back on something in your meals.
  15. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Vevster in Feel like I'm gaining and not losing weight   
    Cauliflower (and other cruciferous vegetables, like broccoli or kale) definitely makes some people feel bloated. I know for myself, I can have these vegetables some, but if I eat them every day for several days, or if I eat them raw, this feeling gets worse, so play with how often you're having them or how much of them you're having. There are plenty of other vegetables out there, try some other for a while.
    Nuts also are pretty hard to digest and cause issues for many people, so you might try cutting them out for a while. If you do choose to have them, try to keep it to a small handful, occasionally.
    Either of those two things could be affecting you, or it could be that you need a little more time -- you're just at the halfway point, and it might take you a little bit longer to adjust.
    I would suggest keeping a food log and noting when you feel bloated and when you don't, so maybe you can narrow things down some more as far as what might be causing this.
  16. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Samantha Ribeiro in Pre workout near lunch time   
    Yes. If the ones on the meal template work for you, it's fine to keep using them, but the article is the newest information. They are planning to update the template.
  17. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Jihanna in Super stressed, about to quit   
    Eating out on a whole30 is hard, and nobody is good at it the first time. Lots of us who have done multiple whole30s still try to plan doing a strict one at a time when we don't have travel and dining out to contend with. You managed, and that is great, and you should celebrate it. 
  18. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Keen On Clean Fuel in Protein/Fruit/Nuts   
    Eggs are a great protein source.
    Broccoli, brussel sprouts, almonds, and pumpkin seeds are all fine to have, but none are really complete protein sources. Broccoli and brussel sprouts would count as vegetables, and all nuts and seeds are considered fats (except peanuts which are legumes and not allowed on whole30). 
    Psychologically, we would encourage you not to think of fruit as dessert, at least not on a daily basis, especially if you currently feel meals are not complete without something sweet to end them. That's more about changing how you think about food. There's nothing inherently wrong with having fruit, or even with occasionally having it as dessert on a special occasion, but you should think about how you currently feel about dessert and if breaking a habit of having them or just getting over your sweet tooth in general is something important to you.
    Pre-wo is somewhat individualized. If the handful of nuts or seeds is working for you, it's fine to keep doing that. Here's more about the latest guidelines for pre and post-workout foods:   https://whole30.com/2019/02/whole30-pre-workout-post-workout/
  19. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Keen On Clean Fuel in Protein/Fruit/Nuts   
    Eggs are a great protein source.
    Broccoli, brussel sprouts, almonds, and pumpkin seeds are all fine to have, but none are really complete protein sources. Broccoli and brussel sprouts would count as vegetables, and all nuts and seeds are considered fats (except peanuts which are legumes and not allowed on whole30). 
    Psychologically, we would encourage you not to think of fruit as dessert, at least not on a daily basis, especially if you currently feel meals are not complete without something sweet to end them. That's more about changing how you think about food. There's nothing inherently wrong with having fruit, or even with occasionally having it as dessert on a special occasion, but you should think about how you currently feel about dessert and if breaking a habit of having them or just getting over your sweet tooth in general is something important to you.
    Pre-wo is somewhat individualized. If the handful of nuts or seeds is working for you, it's fine to keep doing that. Here's more about the latest guidelines for pre and post-workout foods:   https://whole30.com/2019/02/whole30-pre-workout-post-workout/
  20. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Jihanna in Super stressed, about to quit   
    Tessemae's brand does some packets of dressing, but you'd probably have to order online, so that's more something to remember for future trips.
    Wholly Guacamole brand makes some options that are just avocado, or avocado and salt, which you might find in the produce section or possibly frozen in a grocery store. They have a store finder on their web page:  https://www.eatwholly.com/products/chunky-avocado/wholly-chunky-avocado-minis/
  21. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Jihanna in Super stressed, about to quit   
    Tessemae's brand does some packets of dressing, but you'd probably have to order online, so that's more something to remember for future trips.
    Wholly Guacamole brand makes some options that are just avocado, or avocado and salt, which you might find in the produce section or possibly frozen in a grocery store. They have a store finder on their web page:  https://www.eatwholly.com/products/chunky-avocado/wholly-chunky-avocado-minis/
  22. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from FabFitB4_40 in I'm STARVING!!!   
    @FabFitB4_40 the article linked is updated guidance on pre and post-workout foods. If you've been doing what the meal template says and it works for you, it is fine to keep doing that, but in the years since the template was developed, there have been changes in what is recommended, and the article reflects those changes.
  23. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Oaklandish1 in Super stressed, about to quit   
    Steakhouses and seafood places are likely to be able to accommodate you pretty easily. If you know where you'll be going for a meal later, you could check online and see if they list allergens, or call ahead at a non-busy time to ask questions so you know exactly what to order once you get there. In general, look for meat or fish that's grilled, ask if they have an option that hasn't been marinated, if they can season with salt and pepper only (or ask about the seasonings they use), and if they'll either dry grill or cook with olive oil.  Be sure to specify no butter.
    Vegetables may be limited, but most places will have salad and baked potatoes. You'd either need to do oil and vinegar or lemon juice on your salad, or get to a store and find a compliant dressing to carry with you. For a baked potato, you could ask for some olive oil to go on it so it wouldn't be dry, or again, if you can get to a store, pick up some ghee to carry with you.
    If you do get to a store, look for compliant jerky or Epic type meat bars, packs of almonds or other nuts, vegetables like baby carrots and snap peas that you could eat raw and that would hold up reasonably well for several hours at room temperature, packets of compliant almond butter, packets of olives. This way if you go out and there's not something you can eat, or if you are late getting to a meal, you can have some options with you to get you through. 
  24. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Pashcool in Tahini   
    Tahini is fine, just double check ingredients if you buy it to be sure there's nothing added to it.
    Some people use coconut aminos to substitute for soy sauce, but some people don't care for them. They're definitely not exactly the same, you'd just have to try them and see if they work for you.
  25. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from ShieldMaiden in Bacon Fat as Cooking Fat?   
    As long as the bacon is compliant, it is absolutely okay to use the fat to cook in.
     
    (And just a reminder that while bacon is fine to have, you probably shouldn't be eating it every single day: http://whole9life.com/2012/03/bacon/.)