ShannonM816

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  1. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from SammBerg91 in Moose Bone Broth   
    Yes, you can make broth from whatever type of animal you want -- as long as the stuff in the broth is compliant, it's all good.
    The grass fed vs not is not even a requirement -- it's best to get meat from animals raised as close to their natural environment as possible, because that's what's healthiest for the animal, but what the animal ate during its life doesn't affect whether it is Whole30 compliant or not, so if you do want to get beef at some point, it is fine. 
    Just a side note, I don't know what moose smells like when it's cooking, but I know when I made beef broth, I felt like my whole house smelled like it and I wasn't super fond of the smell, it wasn't quite the same smell as like cooking a roast, it was, I guess I'd say stronger. I would imagine moose might be the same way, so if you're doing it in a crock pot and can put your crockpot somewhere sort of out of the way -- on an enclosed patio or in a garage for instance -- that might be something you want to consider doing.
  2. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from ArtFossil in Starting October 8th!   
    So, is there anything in particular making you feel this way? If you started 10/8, you're about 9 days in, so you're about in the time when people are most likely to give up, so this might just be a normal feeling that will pass in a few days, but if there's something that can make this less meh, let's figure that out, especially if you're planning to keep going past 30 days. 
    If it's that you're tired of cooking, look for easy meals for a few days that don't require a lot of prep. Spring for the pre-chopped vegetables if you're tired of prepping them. Find some compliant precooked sausages, or some compliant hot dogs, or a rotisserie chicken, so you have a meal or two that doesn't require much effort. Or research some restaurants and figure out if there's one that you could eat at, and treat yourself to dinner out one night. 
    If it's that you're bored with your food, find some new things to try. Even simple things like a new sauce or dip could change up your normal foods, or if you're going to have time sometime to cook something a little more time consuming, find a recipe or two you've really been wanting to try. (Browse through these for some ideas if you aren't sure where to start:  https://meljoulwan.com/category/recipes/whole30/)
     
  3. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Sconnie715 in Starting Oct 1   
    There's the obvious -- sliced avocado with lime juice and salt, or a handful of olives, or occasionally a handful of nuts -- any of those work well alongside lots of meals.
    There are all kinds of sauces that you can make. I'd start with mayo (I like this method if you have an immersion blender:  https://thehealthyfoodie.com/fail-proof-home-made-paleo-mayo-whole30-compliant/). Mayo can be used as is to dip raw or cooked vegetables or meat in, it can be mixed with herbs to make a salad dressing/dip, it can be used to coat chicken or fish before cooking (like this: http://www.janssushibar.com/worlds-moistest-chicken/, although I think sriracha is not compliant so you'd want to sub hot sauce or something else, or leave it out).  Pesto is easy, I just made a batch of that this week -- this page has three or four variations on that:   https://meljoulwan.com/2009/08/05/presto-pesto/.  You can put it over zoodles or spaghetti squash, or on some steak or chicken, or mix it with mayo to make a really great salad dressing/dip. Chimichurri is another easy one:  https://meljoulwan.com/2014/07/02/chimichurri-aka-magic-sauce/ -- use it in much the same way you'd use the pesto. Sunshine Sauce is another good option:  https://meljoulwan.com/2009/07/21/sunshine-sauce/ -- I like to make these meatballs (except I cook the sweet potatoes first, I didn't like the chunks of them in mine): https://nomnompaleo.com/post/39832097367/whole30-day-6-asian-meatballs and dip them in the sunshine sauce.  Basically, any sauce or dip where the most prominent ingredient is oil or nut butter or mayo is going to add a good amount of fat to your food. It's also a great way to be able to batch cook, and then have different flavors all week -- make a bunch of chicken with really simple seasonings like salt, pepper, and garlic, and just change the sauce you serve over it each day. 
    You can also make soups with coconut milk, add a few nuts to a salad, mix a spoonful of almond butter or sunbutter into a stirfry, put a dollop of ghee or some oil on a baked potato or sweet potato. 
     
  4. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Sconnie715 in Starting Oct 1   
    There's the obvious -- sliced avocado with lime juice and salt, or a handful of olives, or occasionally a handful of nuts -- any of those work well alongside lots of meals.
    There are all kinds of sauces that you can make. I'd start with mayo (I like this method if you have an immersion blender:  https://thehealthyfoodie.com/fail-proof-home-made-paleo-mayo-whole30-compliant/). Mayo can be used as is to dip raw or cooked vegetables or meat in, it can be mixed with herbs to make a salad dressing/dip, it can be used to coat chicken or fish before cooking (like this: http://www.janssushibar.com/worlds-moistest-chicken/, although I think sriracha is not compliant so you'd want to sub hot sauce or something else, or leave it out).  Pesto is easy, I just made a batch of that this week -- this page has three or four variations on that:   https://meljoulwan.com/2009/08/05/presto-pesto/.  You can put it over zoodles or spaghetti squash, or on some steak or chicken, or mix it with mayo to make a really great salad dressing/dip. Chimichurri is another easy one:  https://meljoulwan.com/2014/07/02/chimichurri-aka-magic-sauce/ -- use it in much the same way you'd use the pesto. Sunshine Sauce is another good option:  https://meljoulwan.com/2009/07/21/sunshine-sauce/ -- I like to make these meatballs (except I cook the sweet potatoes first, I didn't like the chunks of them in mine): https://nomnompaleo.com/post/39832097367/whole30-day-6-asian-meatballs and dip them in the sunshine sauce.  Basically, any sauce or dip where the most prominent ingredient is oil or nut butter or mayo is going to add a good amount of fat to your food. It's also a great way to be able to batch cook, and then have different flavors all week -- make a bunch of chicken with really simple seasonings like salt, pepper, and garlic, and just change the sauce you serve over it each day. 
    You can also make soups with coconut milk, add a few nuts to a salad, mix a spoonful of almond butter or sunbutter into a stirfry, put a dollop of ghee or some oil on a baked potato or sweet potato. 
     
  5. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Elizabeth33 in Starting October 8th!   
    Stress will definitely make you crave things, so that probably is a big part of it. Hopefully you have a little less stress going forward. 
    More fat at dinner probably won't hurt -- we usually tell people to pick one or two of the fats listed on the meal template, in addition to whatever oil they cook in, and if sometimes it's a little more, that's not a problem.
    It may sound counterintutive, but being sure you eat within an hour of getting up each day will actually do a lot to help with the night time munchies too. It's to do with cortisol levels and stuff -- ideally your cortisol levels are high in the morning, and go down throughout the day, and along with that, you'll be hungry in the morning, and less so by the end of the day. This article has a pretty good summary:   https://www.thepaleomom.com/is-breakfast-really-most-important-meal/. 
  6. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Elizabeth33 in Starting October 8th!   
    You're heading into the toughest time of the Whole30 for most people. Days 10 & 11 in particular are the days most people seem to quit, but basically you've hit a point where it's not all shiny and new and exciting anymore, but you're not far enough in that you're really seeing benefits yet, so it can be tempting to just quit. Don't do it! Just hang in there. 
    Are you having at least one serving of starchy vegetable each day? (Like potato, sweet potato, carrots, parsnips, turnips, beets, rutabagas, plantains, or any of the winter squashes like acorn or butternut.) Most people feel best with at least one fist-sized serving of starchy vegetable each day, and some need more, especially anyone who is very active, who is prone to depression or anxiety, who is pregnant or nursing, or who is in the week or so leading up to their period. If you need a couple of servings a day to feel good, or even a serving at every meal, that is fine, just continue to also eat other types of vegetables as well.
  7. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from wag_2013 in Eating after dinner - intense cravings   
    The first thing you might try is not ever having fruit between meals, only with a full template meal. So in the evening, if you want to eat, have a hard boiled egg, or some leftovers that include protein, fat, and maybe some vegetables. If you don't really want those things, you're probably not actually hungry, so don't eat, go find something else to do that will keep your brain and your hands busy for a little while -- work on a hobby, do some laundry, organize your closet, go for a walk, read a book, work on a puzzle, take a bubble bath, or just go to bed early.
  8. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Betsie_n in Starting Oct 1   
    It's possible. If you really want to be able to use coconut milk, try some different brands/different packaging types-- some people find that the guar gum in some brands bothers them, even though it is ok to have on whole30, and others find they react to something in canned coconut milk but are okay with brands that come in tetrapacks. If you're okay going without it, that is also fine, there are plenty of whole30 recipes that don't use it at all.
  9. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from McKaylaCole in Re-Introducing Wine   
    If this is the wine you drink, I'd go ahead and have it -- there's no reason to drink something you don't really like just to do reintroductions.  These are the ingredients I see online:  Wine, Grape Must, Sugar, Color Added (Grape Skin Extract), Natural Flavors, Sulphur Dioxide (Antioxidant). No Added Juice.  I googled Is Stella Rosa wine gluten free, and there's a statement from the company saying all their wines are gluten free. The Sulphur Dioxide is a sulfite (most wines have them), so you'll be reintroducing them and alcohol and added sugar, and these ingredients are hard to find on their own without any other non-Whole30 things, so to me, if this is what sounds good to you, I'd go ahead and do it. If you do have a reaction like a headache, you might do an extra day of reintroducing sulfites in some other form -- dried fruit maybe -- to see if that's what you were reacting to, or if it's just the alcohol. 
  10. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from jadore43210 in Different results from each whole30   
    It's definitely not weird to have different results from each Whole30. So much affects our health and our weight -- sleep, stress, food, exercise, hormones -- and some of these things we cannot control. It's hard to say why this Whole30 is so different from your last one. You might have been more stressed this time around, you might have (possibly not even consciously) been restricting how much food or how much fat you ate in an effort to make your weight loss happen faster. It might be because of working out -- not that working out isn't good, it definitely is, but it is a stressor, and it might be taking your body a little while to adjust to that added stress. 
    The best thing to do for long-term health (and ultimately weight loss) is to keep making healthy decisions most of the time. So, if most of your meals are close to Whole30, if you work out a few times a week most weeks, if you get good sleep most nights, if you minimize stress as much as you can, and you keep doing these things consistently over time, you will continue to get healthier and ultimately your weight will get to a healthy place. We can't predict how long any of this will take, but in general, this is what will work. 
    For now, focus on the fact that you lost a pound a week during your Whole30, and that you've lost six inches. These are good things, and they are evidence you are doing things that are making your body healthier. You have definitely not failed. We tend to think we can control everything about our bodies, but we just can't -- all we can do is do the things we know make us healthier, and then our bodies react however they react on their on timeline. 
  11. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from ladyshanny in not possible   
    Tonnes are tons -- regional spelling variation, I'm guessing, since ladyshanny is in Canada, I think.
    For sauces,  there's chimichurri: http://meljoulwan.com/2014/07/02/chimichurri-aka-magic-sauce/, or pesto (not store bought, since most contains cheese):  http://meljoulwan.com/2009/08/05/presto-pesto/
    For the vegetables you won't eat, why won't you eat them? If it's an allergy, fine, but if it's a belief that you don't like them, it might be time to examine why you don't like them and if there are different ways to prepare them that might be more palatable. 
  12. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from jadore43210 in Different results from each whole30   
    It's definitely not weird to have different results from each Whole30. So much affects our health and our weight -- sleep, stress, food, exercise, hormones -- and some of these things we cannot control. It's hard to say why this Whole30 is so different from your last one. You might have been more stressed this time around, you might have (possibly not even consciously) been restricting how much food or how much fat you ate in an effort to make your weight loss happen faster. It might be because of working out -- not that working out isn't good, it definitely is, but it is a stressor, and it might be taking your body a little while to adjust to that added stress. 
    The best thing to do for long-term health (and ultimately weight loss) is to keep making healthy decisions most of the time. So, if most of your meals are close to Whole30, if you work out a few times a week most weeks, if you get good sleep most nights, if you minimize stress as much as you can, and you keep doing these things consistently over time, you will continue to get healthier and ultimately your weight will get to a healthy place. We can't predict how long any of this will take, but in general, this is what will work. 
    For now, focus on the fact that you lost a pound a week during your Whole30, and that you've lost six inches. These are good things, and they are evidence you are doing things that are making your body healthier. You have definitely not failed. We tend to think we can control everything about our bodies, but we just can't -- all we can do is do the things we know make us healthier, and then our bodies react however they react on their on timeline. 
  13. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Betsie_n in Starting Oct 1   
    There aren't really any official meal plans, other than the one-week one in the Whole30 book. There are a ton of bloggers out there who have done Whole30 who offer recipes and meal plans, just be sure you know the rules and check that everything they list is Whole30 compliant, and hopefully that the meals are meeting the meal template (remember that pancakes, even if they're made with compliant ingredients, are never okay, and things like chia pudding or monkey salad on their own do not meet the meal template recommendation). 
    Here are a few good places to start: https://nomnompaleo.com/post/42057515329/the-round-up-30-days-of-whole30-recipes (recipes, not so much a meal plan),   https://meljoulwan.com/category/recipes/whole30/ (again, recipes, not really a meal plan), https://www.ourpaleolife.com/whole30-meal-plan-grocery-list/ (actual meal plan).
    Also remember that you do not have to make a bunch of new recipes all the time. They can definitely be useful to fight food boredom and to get you to try new things, but it is absolutely okay to have a burger patty topped with guacamole, some roasted potato or sweet potato chunks, and salad, or to find a whole30-compliant taco seasoning and use it to season a pound of ground beef, which you can then put on top of a pile of lettuce, tomatoes, onions, bell peppers, zucchini, yellow squash, and grated carrots with a big dollop of guacamole, some sliced onions, and some compliant salad dressing. Keep it simple as much as you can so you don't end up burned out on all the cooking. And always cook extra so you have leftovers for another meal. 
    You can download the meal template here:  https://whole30.com/pdf-downloads/
  14. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Betsie_n in Starting Oct 1   
    There aren't really any official meal plans, other than the one-week one in the Whole30 book. There are a ton of bloggers out there who have done Whole30 who offer recipes and meal plans, just be sure you know the rules and check that everything they list is Whole30 compliant, and hopefully that the meals are meeting the meal template (remember that pancakes, even if they're made with compliant ingredients, are never okay, and things like chia pudding or monkey salad on their own do not meet the meal template recommendation). 
    Here are a few good places to start: https://nomnompaleo.com/post/42057515329/the-round-up-30-days-of-whole30-recipes (recipes, not so much a meal plan),   https://meljoulwan.com/category/recipes/whole30/ (again, recipes, not really a meal plan), https://www.ourpaleolife.com/whole30-meal-plan-grocery-list/ (actual meal plan).
    Also remember that you do not have to make a bunch of new recipes all the time. They can definitely be useful to fight food boredom and to get you to try new things, but it is absolutely okay to have a burger patty topped with guacamole, some roasted potato or sweet potato chunks, and salad, or to find a whole30-compliant taco seasoning and use it to season a pound of ground beef, which you can then put on top of a pile of lettuce, tomatoes, onions, bell peppers, zucchini, yellow squash, and grated carrots with a big dollop of guacamole, some sliced onions, and some compliant salad dressing. Keep it simple as much as you can so you don't end up burned out on all the cooking. And always cook extra so you have leftovers for another meal. 
    You can download the meal template here:  https://whole30.com/pdf-downloads/
  15. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from CassieK in Can I have The new primal mustard bbq   
    Yes, this is fine.
  16. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Mysteria in I really want to start Whole30 but can I? Should I?   
    Whole30 can definitely be difficult, especially if you already have food restrictions. It is okay to decide this isn't for you, no one diet plan is ever going to work for everyone.
    For most people, symptoms like headache, tiredness, and some digestive issues happen in the first week or so when they start Whole30, and it's usually because it's a big change from how they ate before. For most people, these symptoms do subside. When you look at the forum, you may feel like there's just a whole lot of negative, but lots of people find the forum because they're having problems and want to ask questions -- people who have no issues, may never think to look for the forum, so there just aren't going to be as many people coming here who feel great and have no issues (although there are definitely success stories and testimonials you can read if you want to hear from people who have been successful, like these: https://whole30.com/2011/06/the-whole30-a-z-real-life-testimonials/, or these: https://forum.whole30.com/forum/26-success-stories/). 
    You don't have to have the books to do a Whole30. Everything you need to know is available for free on the website -- start here: https://whole30.com/new/, and follow the different links provided. The books are nice for people who prefer to have a physical book to hold in their hands, and there are some extras in them that aren't available online, like recipes, or in the case of It Starts With Food, more of the science behind why the rules are what they are, but many people do Whole30 without ever buying or reading any of the books.
    For your son, it is definitely harder to do Whole30 as a vegetarian. This talks a little bit about it: https://whole30.com/2017/06/veg-whole30/. 
    If you decide a Whole30 is not for you, you can still focus on eating vegetables, protein, and healthy fat at each meal, with fruit occasionally, and try to cut out added sugars as much as possible. Look at what you're currently eating, and try to figure out where you can make healthier choices. Meal planning happens whether you're doing Whole30 or not -- you've got to eat something -- so try to figure out how to take what you're doing now and make it healthier. Whole30 meals can be as simple as burger patties and roasted vegetables, or omelettes stuffed with broccoli or spinach or whatever vegetables you like. 
  17. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Nongermane in Pre & Post Workout “Meals”   
    Don't use fruit for pre or post-workout. I know traditionally people do fruit/starch pre-workout for that extra energy, but one of the goals of Whole30 is to become fat-adapted, which means your body will be able to more easily use fat as an energy source, rather than just the easily accessible energy of carbs. Continuing to give your body carbs right before a workout may keep that transition from happening. Post-workout, fruit replaces liver glycogen before muscle glycogen while starchy vegetables do the opposite -- and you want to replace what you've taken out of your muscles right after your workout. (Read more about fat adaptation here:  https://www.marksdailyapple.com/what-does-it-mean-to-be-fat-adapted/.)
    Pre-workout needs to be fat and protein. The almond butter is fine if that's what works for you. Post-workout, have some protein and some starchy vegetable, so chicken and sweet potato for instance.  There's more about post-WO meals, what to have and why, here: http://whole9life.com/2015/02/eat-post-workout/. If you need something during a really long run, I know some people have used baby food packets of sweet potato because they're easy to carry. Coconut water doesn't necessarily have a lot of sodium. Be sure you salt your food at each meal, and if you still need more, you might add a little bit of salt to whatever you drink during your workout. 
    If you browse through the Whole30 for Athletes part of the forum, you'll find discussion from people doing all kinds of exercise and what they use for fuel. You can also google Whole30 forum marathon and find marathon-specific discussions. 
     
  18. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from MalJade in Pre & Post Workout “Meals”   
    Pre-WO should be protein and fat, though I know some people just do fat if that's easier for them to stomach -- you may have to try different things for a few days to see what works best for you. Leftover meat would be easy. If it's the hard boiled part that bothers you more than the egg itself, you could scramble an egg, or make some egg muffins or a frittata. A spoonful of nut butter or coconut butter or a handful of olives or some avocado/guacamole. 
     
  19. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Nongermane in Starting September 24th   
    It's not an option for everyone, I know, but grocery delivery services like Instacart or Shipt, or some stores are even doing delivery or curbside pickup themselves, can be really nice. They do cost more -- there's fees and tips and there can also a little bit of a markup on the items themselves -- but on the other hand, I don't end up with a bunch of impulse buys, and it really forces me to meal plan better, so at least sometimes I decide it's worth paying for. If you live in a place where such things are available, and you really dislike going to the store, it might be at least worth looking into. 
  20. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from SaraEC in Gas   
    If you post a day or two of typical meals, including approximate serving sizes, we can take a look and see if anything stands out.
    In general, things that might cause constipation include not drinking enough water or not eating enough vegetables. Gas and bloating might be from the types of vegetables you're eating -- in particular, cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, or cauliflower can cause it, and in general any vegetables eaten raw are more likely to cause it than cooked ones. Eating a lot of nuts and seeds can also cause bloating and other digestive issues. 
  21. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from NancyKR in How do I search these forums?   
    There is a search button, I'm not sure why it's not working for you, but it's not the best way to search the forum anyway.
    The best way to search is to Google Whole30 + whatever you're searching for, or Whole30 forum + whatever you're searching for. Typically, information from the Whole30 site or from within the forums will be at the top of the search results. 
  22. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from wag_2013 in Food Freedom Fail   
    Have you looked at the Food Freedom Forever book? You might find it helpful. And if you want a whole30 coach, there are coaches in different countries and ones who work with you online rather than in person, so it could still be an option for you.
    The most important thing for you to know right now is that finding your food freedom takes work, and will probably always take work, though it will mostly get easier over time if you keep working on it. Very few people do a whole30 and immediately have everything figured out for the rest of their lives, and the few who do manage that probably already had some good habits they were building on. The bigger a change this way of eating is, the harder it is to change and make those changes stick. It is absolutely normal to slip back into old habits. You just have to get yourself back on track and keep working on it. There's nothing wrong with you, you're not a failure, you are a human being working to change your life for the better. 
    Think of it this way: food freedom is a skill you are learning. For any skill, there are a few people who are really good at it the first time they try it, but most people have to keep practicing. As long as you keep practicing you'll get better overall, though some days you won't see progress, and some days you may feel like you're going backwards. Those individual days don't matter as long as the overall trajectory is upwards toward your goal.
  23. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Maeberries in Omega 3 count as your fat serving?   
    The meal template is a minimum guideline. In general, you'd pick one or two servings of fat from the template in addition to any oil you cook in. I wouldn't count your fish oil as a fat serving, especially since you're struggling to stay full between meals. Bacon can count toward your fat, but again, if you're struggling to stay full between meals, you might need more than that. If you're having trouble going 4-5 hours between meals, it is definitely fine to eat larger meals. 
  24. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from julieinCA in Newbie, starting October 1st   
    There was a daily email, but they discontinued it when the Day by Day book came out. 
  25. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from MalJade in Pre & Post Workout “Meals”   
    Pre-WO should be protein and fat, though I know some people just do fat if that's easier for them to stomach -- you may have to try different things for a few days to see what works best for you. Leftover meat would be easy. If it's the hard boiled part that bothers you more than the egg itself, you could scramble an egg, or make some egg muffins or a frittata. A spoonful of nut butter or coconut butter or a handful of olives or some avocado/guacamole.