ShannonM816

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  1. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from laura1701 in Whole 5 (monday-friday)?   
    Have you read the stuff about life after Whole30 here on the website? https://whole30.com/step-four-finished
    Or the book Food Freedom Forever, if you like to have an actual book in your hands.
    There are a couple of things I'd encourage you to think about in reference to a five-on, two-off type pattern. First, sometimes if you tell yourself that it's okay to indulge a little on certain days, you decide to indulge because you can, even if you don't really think whatever you're indulging in sounds that great. There's something about the mindset you can get into where you feel like, this is my chance to have this thing that's not healthy, and by gosh, I'm going to have it, no matter what.
    The second thing I'd mention is that this doesn't account for things like your coworker making your very favorite cookies ever, from scratch, on a Monday. What do you do then? Are you going to say, my own personal rules say I only indulge on Saturday and Sunday, so I have to say no? Or switch days for the week?  Bend the rules? Wouldn't it be easier to know that if something comes up that you think is worth it, you can have it no matter what day it is? And isn't it possible you'll feel more able to turn down things that don't really sound all that special, because you know that when you do really want something, no matter what it is, or what day you want it, you can go ahead and indulge?
     
  2. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from berry straw in Cannot stop my food "issues"   
    First, the biggest thing I'd recommend -- and you may have already figured this out last time you did Whole30 -- is to make sure you really make your meals match the template. It's a lot easier to not eat if you're not hungry, and it's a lot easier to know you're not hungry if you know you just ate a big meal with plenty of vegetables, protein and healthy fats. Don't be afraid to eat enough at meals to keep you satisfied for 4-5 hours at a time.
    Can you get up from your desk and walk around a bit? That's a good option if you can -- go fill up your water bottle, go outside for a few minutes, stand up and stretch, if you have something you need to tell another employee, go to their desk and tell them rather than emailing or calling. If you have something you do every day, like check the mailbox, or take a stack of papers to another part of the office, something that you have to get up and go do, try to save that for a time when you need a break.
    When you get home, start a new habit. Take a few minutes to change into comfy clothes and fuzzy slippers. Sit down and journal about your day. Meditate or pray. Stretch. Do a light workout, walk around the block. Work on a hobby. Find something that isn't food, that gives you a sense of ending your work day and moving on to your personal time. 
    I know there are people who do overcome bad food habits. I also know that for many of us, it's not a 30-day process, it's something that is ongoing. For myself, sometimes I do pretty well, and then sometimes I really, really don't. It's okay to mess up. I would be amazed if someone came here and said they did a Whole30, and suddenly every bad habit they'd ever had just went away completely, and they were eating perfectly from that moment on. That's not how it works for the vast majority of people. We have a lifetime of bad habits to overcome, it's going to take a while to change them.
    You might like the book Food Freedom Forever, it's all about how to live the rest of your life after Whole30. There are also blog posts that you can read for free about life after Whole30 that might be helpful as well, you can find many of those linked here:  https://whole30.com/step-four-finished
  3. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Sugar free barista in Meal interval   
    Generally, we'd tell people to eat when they're hungry. Most people can learn to compose meals that keep them satisfied for 4-5 hours -- that's where that comes from -- and for most people, being able to go 4-5 hours between meals means they don't need to snack. There's no official timer for how often you need to eat, though. For anyone, if you're hungry, you eat. If it's an hour since you last ate, but for whatever reason you are hungry, eat.  That's not carte blanche to just nibble throughout the day, but there's definitely flexibility there to eat when you need to eat, based on your individual circumstances.
    You have some additional difficulties because with your schedule, it seems you're going to have to eat when you have time to eat, and that might mean that at times, you're eating when you're not hungry because if you don't eat then, you may not get another opportunity until you're very, very hungry -- and that's fine. It also means that there might be times when you have to wait longer than you'd really like to to eat, and that also is fine, although certainly keep an eye on how you're feeling and if you feel that you must eat or you're going to pass out, be sure you eat -- I'm pretty sure your employer would prefer you to eat in that circumstance. When you get used to eating this way, and you've become fat adapted, the amount of time you can go between meals might be longer, which is really convenient if it happens, but you have a job where you are much more active all day than lots of other people are, so it might not happen, because in general, if you're more active, you need more food.
    I feel like somewhere in this discussion, people started talking at cross purposes. I'm still not entirely sure this is really what you're asking about, but I kind of feel like you might be getting a little hung up on stuff that really isn't that important. The meal template, the hours between meals -- those are recommendations. As long as everything you've eaten meets the rules of the program, you'll have done a Whole30. Don't get hung up on trying to get it perfect, just be sure you follow the rules themselves, and do the best you can with the recommendations.
  4. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from laura1701 in Whole 5 (monday-friday)?   
    Have you read the stuff about life after Whole30 here on the website? https://whole30.com/step-four-finished
    Or the book Food Freedom Forever, if you like to have an actual book in your hands.
    There are a couple of things I'd encourage you to think about in reference to a five-on, two-off type pattern. First, sometimes if you tell yourself that it's okay to indulge a little on certain days, you decide to indulge because you can, even if you don't really think whatever you're indulging in sounds that great. There's something about the mindset you can get into where you feel like, this is my chance to have this thing that's not healthy, and by gosh, I'm going to have it, no matter what.
    The second thing I'd mention is that this doesn't account for things like your coworker making your very favorite cookies ever, from scratch, on a Monday. What do you do then? Are you going to say, my own personal rules say I only indulge on Saturday and Sunday, so I have to say no? Or switch days for the week?  Bend the rules? Wouldn't it be easier to know that if something comes up that you think is worth it, you can have it no matter what day it is? And isn't it possible you'll feel more able to turn down things that don't really sound all that special, because you know that when you do really want something, no matter what it is, or what day you want it, you can go ahead and indulge?
     
  5. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Sugar free barista in Meal interval   
    Generally, we'd tell people to eat when they're hungry. Most people can learn to compose meals that keep them satisfied for 4-5 hours -- that's where that comes from -- and for most people, being able to go 4-5 hours between meals means they don't need to snack. There's no official timer for how often you need to eat, though. For anyone, if you're hungry, you eat. If it's an hour since you last ate, but for whatever reason you are hungry, eat.  That's not carte blanche to just nibble throughout the day, but there's definitely flexibility there to eat when you need to eat, based on your individual circumstances.
    You have some additional difficulties because with your schedule, it seems you're going to have to eat when you have time to eat, and that might mean that at times, you're eating when you're not hungry because if you don't eat then, you may not get another opportunity until you're very, very hungry -- and that's fine. It also means that there might be times when you have to wait longer than you'd really like to to eat, and that also is fine, although certainly keep an eye on how you're feeling and if you feel that you must eat or you're going to pass out, be sure you eat -- I'm pretty sure your employer would prefer you to eat in that circumstance. When you get used to eating this way, and you've become fat adapted, the amount of time you can go between meals might be longer, which is really convenient if it happens, but you have a job where you are much more active all day than lots of other people are, so it might not happen, because in general, if you're more active, you need more food.
    I feel like somewhere in this discussion, people started talking at cross purposes. I'm still not entirely sure this is really what you're asking about, but I kind of feel like you might be getting a little hung up on stuff that really isn't that important. The meal template, the hours between meals -- those are recommendations. As long as everything you've eaten meets the rules of the program, you'll have done a Whole30. Don't get hung up on trying to get it perfect, just be sure you follow the rules themselves, and do the best you can with the recommendations.
  6. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Sugar free barista in Meal interval   
    Generally, we'd tell people to eat when they're hungry. Most people can learn to compose meals that keep them satisfied for 4-5 hours -- that's where that comes from -- and for most people, being able to go 4-5 hours between meals means they don't need to snack. There's no official timer for how often you need to eat, though. For anyone, if you're hungry, you eat. If it's an hour since you last ate, but for whatever reason you are hungry, eat.  That's not carte blanche to just nibble throughout the day, but there's definitely flexibility there to eat when you need to eat, based on your individual circumstances.
    You have some additional difficulties because with your schedule, it seems you're going to have to eat when you have time to eat, and that might mean that at times, you're eating when you're not hungry because if you don't eat then, you may not get another opportunity until you're very, very hungry -- and that's fine. It also means that there might be times when you have to wait longer than you'd really like to to eat, and that also is fine, although certainly keep an eye on how you're feeling and if you feel that you must eat or you're going to pass out, be sure you eat -- I'm pretty sure your employer would prefer you to eat in that circumstance. When you get used to eating this way, and you've become fat adapted, the amount of time you can go between meals might be longer, which is really convenient if it happens, but you have a job where you are much more active all day than lots of other people are, so it might not happen, because in general, if you're more active, you need more food.
    I feel like somewhere in this discussion, people started talking at cross purposes. I'm still not entirely sure this is really what you're asking about, but I kind of feel like you might be getting a little hung up on stuff that really isn't that important. The meal template, the hours between meals -- those are recommendations. As long as everything you've eaten meets the rules of the program, you'll have done a Whole30. Don't get hung up on trying to get it perfect, just be sure you follow the rules themselves, and do the best you can with the recommendations.
  7. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from AnnBland in Day 10 food aversions   
    Day 10 and 11 are the days when most people want to quit. I can't explain why, but it's pretty common, so that might be some of what's going on here. Most people do go through some food boredom at some point, and just a general feeling of "I don't want to do this anymore" is pretty common.
    I have never been pregnant, so I don't have personal experience of food aversions, but my understanding is they can be bad, and even Melissa Hartwig, when she was pregnant, couldn't stay 100% compliant, because there were things that she just couldn't eat. Here's an article about it:  https://whole30.com/2013/01/pregnancy-and-food-aversions/
    If that's what is going on, it might be that now isn't the right time for a true whole30, because you need to eat, for yourself, for the tiny human you're growing, and for the toddler you're breastfeeding.
    If you do want to try to stay Whole30, look at what you're craving and see if you can figure out a way to have something similar.  For spaghetti, you could do spaghetti squash with sauce,  or if you think it's more that you want something really carby, maybe top a baked potato or sweet potato with a meaty spaghetti sauce or chili. 
  8. Like
    ShannonM816 reacted to Nicole Lee in I want to quit or cry or both   
    I threw my scale in a dumpster yesterday. I feel like my entire whole30 purpose was to get to this moment. The greatest NSV of all time! I am finally free  
  9. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from RandiW in Day 22 and I just realized my mistake.   
    The 22 days you've already put in were definitely not wasted, you still did amazing things for your health by eating good foods. You were already thinking of continuing on, so hang in there and keep going. That pastry is not going to make you feel better in the long run. This is the part of Whole30 where you get the opportunity to work on changing your relationship with food and look at why you think pastry is comforting, and what else you could do instead for comfort. Coming here and posting was great. If you feel you still need to do more, what would help? Do you want to yell and scream about this? Do that! It's okay to be angry and upset. Maybe exercise would male you feel better, or meditation, or working on a hobby, or a bubble bath. Do whatever helps you to move on from this and keep going.
  10. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from AnitaC in Help me make softer meatballs!   
    Or just use it mashed/pureed.
    You could try the cream of tartar/baking soda trick that Mel Joulwan uses here:   http://meljoulwan.com/2014/03/27/gyoza-meatballs/  (also, she's got a ton of meatball recipes, if you ever want to branch out and try new flavors).
  11. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from berry straw in Cannot stop my food "issues"   
    First, the biggest thing I'd recommend -- and you may have already figured this out last time you did Whole30 -- is to make sure you really make your meals match the template. It's a lot easier to not eat if you're not hungry, and it's a lot easier to know you're not hungry if you know you just ate a big meal with plenty of vegetables, protein and healthy fats. Don't be afraid to eat enough at meals to keep you satisfied for 4-5 hours at a time.
    Can you get up from your desk and walk around a bit? That's a good option if you can -- go fill up your water bottle, go outside for a few minutes, stand up and stretch, if you have something you need to tell another employee, go to their desk and tell them rather than emailing or calling. If you have something you do every day, like check the mailbox, or take a stack of papers to another part of the office, something that you have to get up and go do, try to save that for a time when you need a break.
    When you get home, start a new habit. Take a few minutes to change into comfy clothes and fuzzy slippers. Sit down and journal about your day. Meditate or pray. Stretch. Do a light workout, walk around the block. Work on a hobby. Find something that isn't food, that gives you a sense of ending your work day and moving on to your personal time. 
    I know there are people who do overcome bad food habits. I also know that for many of us, it's not a 30-day process, it's something that is ongoing. For myself, sometimes I do pretty well, and then sometimes I really, really don't. It's okay to mess up. I would be amazed if someone came here and said they did a Whole30, and suddenly every bad habit they'd ever had just went away completely, and they were eating perfectly from that moment on. That's not how it works for the vast majority of people. We have a lifetime of bad habits to overcome, it's going to take a while to change them.
    You might like the book Food Freedom Forever, it's all about how to live the rest of your life after Whole30. There are also blog posts that you can read for free about life after Whole30 that might be helpful as well, you can find many of those linked here:  https://whole30.com/step-four-finished
  12. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from AnitaC in Help me make softer meatballs!   
    Or just use it mashed/pureed.
    You could try the cream of tartar/baking soda trick that Mel Joulwan uses here:   http://meljoulwan.com/2014/03/27/gyoza-meatballs/  (also, she's got a ton of meatball recipes, if you ever want to branch out and try new flavors).
  13. Like
    ShannonM816 reacted to quitequaint in Day 22 and I just realized my mistake.   
    After I wrote my post, I got into my car and headed to my local gluten-free bakery. Half-way there, I realized I really didn't need a pastry. My craving had subsided, so I immediately turned back around. I took a walk around my neighborhood instead and just being outside helped. That was a major win for me against my relentless sugar dragon! My habits truly are changing, slowly but surely, and I can't give up now! Thank you so much for your support.
  14. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from renee529 in Gastric Bypass Surgery   
    There have definitely been people who have done Whole30 after weight loss surgery -- google Whole30 weight loss surgery to pull up old discussions if you want to read more, or someone may pop in here with more information.
     
    In general, there's no reason why you shouldn't do a Whole30 if you can eat meat, vegetables, and healthy fats, although you will probably have to ignore the usual instruction to eat three meals a day, no snacks, as you probably can't eat as much at one meal as someone who hasn't had the surgery. If that's the case for you, you'll need to make sure that, however many meals you need to eat a day, they consist of a mix of protein, vegetable, and fat, with occasional servings of fruit with your meal. You'll also want to ensure that over the course of a day, you eat at least the equivalent of three minimum-sized template meals (one template meal would be 1-2 palm-sized servings of protein, 1-2 thumb-sized servings of fat, and 2-3 cups of vegetables). 
     
    In other words, if what you can comfortably eat at a meal is 1/2 a palm-sized serving of protein, 1/2 a thumb sized serving of fat, and 1-2 cups of vegetables, you'd need to eat six times a day to be sure you met at least the minimum amount of food you need. Make sense? If you can eat more, that's fine too, I'm just basing that on the fact that most people who do have wls usually can't eat full-sized meals at one time, but as an adult human being, you still need to be sure you get enough food throughout the day.
  15. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from purplepadres in Loss of Appetite (2nd Whole30)   
    Sometimes the loss of appetite thing happens, but you do need to be sure you're eating. Not eating can sometimes lead to continuing to not feel hungry, which just perpetuates the problem. Stress could cause you to be less hungry, and some medications or illnesses could also cause it. If it was related to the flu or anything you were taking for it, you'd expect it to be clearing up pretty soon now.
    In general, try to think of anything that does sound good to eat. Are you the type that likes familiar foods most of the time -- if so, make some of those. If you think this is at all food boredom and you're tired of the same things all the time, now would be the time to look for some new recipes with new flavors you might not have tried before. (www.meljoulwan.com is a good source of mostly Whole30 recipes with a focus on spices and flavors)
    Whatever type of food you think you could eat, I'd recommend that you eat within an hour of waking up in the morning, and then eat something every 4-5 hours after that (obviously, if you're hungry between meals, it's fine to eat -- but if you continue to not really feel hungry, set a timer and eat something).  
    If you feel like your workouts are not helping you be healthier right at this moment -- if you think your time might be better spent getting more rest, or doing just some gentle stretching, or hiking/getting outdoors somewhere -- consider taking a break from them, especially if you're truly not eating enough to fuel them. If you feel like they are doing you good, if you physically feel better doing them than you would not, that's fine, but do try to add some post-workout food, a few bites of lean protein at least. 
  16. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from chrisg16 in Starting my first Whole30 on January 22nd!   
    Be sure you're adding fat to your meals. In general pick one or two options from the meal template in addition to any oil you cook in. 
    Also, remember that it is okay to have starchy vegetables like potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, parsnips, beets, turnips, rutabagas, butternut or acorn or other winter squashes. Most people do well with a fist-sized serving at one meal a day, but people who are very active, who are prone to depression or anxiety, or women who are nursing, pregnant, or in the week or so leading up to their period often need more. 
    You shouldn't depend on nuts or seeds as your main fat source, but you can occasionally add them for a little crunch. For instance, add pecans or walnuts in a chicken salad, make something like these green beans, or just top your food with your favorite toasted nuts. 
    Commercially prepared chips are out, but you could make your own kale chips or zucchini chips or really chips from whatever vegetable you like by baking them in the oven -- google for instructions and just be sure you use compliant seasonings and oils.
  17. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Worldismyoyster in Whole30 fast and easy need help asap!   
    It's probably too late now if you were in the middle of cooking, but I would've added it to the skillet when I put the onion and pepper back in at the end. I'm not sure what was truly intended, though.
  18. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from AnitaC in Crushed garlic in a jar with glucose   
    It's not as good as fresh, but when I'm in a hurry, I use garlic powder and onion powder instead.
    You can also chop and freeze onions, garlic, and other vegetables you use often -- Google each type of veggie and look for instructions. Here's one I found for doing a bunch if garlic at once:  https://www.theyummylife.com/Mince_Freeze_Garlic
  19. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Josiekk in Cold and/or flu for entire whole30... day 17   
    If he's exhausted, are you sure he's eating enough? Remember that his servings will be based on his hand size, not yours, and that for everyone, the meal template suggests a range -- so 1-2 palm-sized portions of protein, 1-2 servings of fat (generally, in addition to what you cook in), and then fill up your plate with vegetables.
    Maybe make him some Whole30 "comfort food" -- chicken soup (I like this one with ginger and garlic:  https://www.stupideasypaleo.com/2014/08/17/healing-chicken-soup-paleo-whole30/), baked potato or sweet potato with ghee or coconut oil and salt, stew, roast. Something warm and comforting and filling.
    We all know logically that eating crappy food won't really help anything, but for many of us, it's our way to comfort ourselves, and that could've started back in childhood, when being sick meant getting special foods that now we associate with making us feel better. We know it's not really true, but it can be really hard to overcome that habit.
     
  20. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Josiekk in Cold and/or flu for entire whole30... day 17   
    If he's exhausted, are you sure he's eating enough? Remember that his servings will be based on his hand size, not yours, and that for everyone, the meal template suggests a range -- so 1-2 palm-sized portions of protein, 1-2 servings of fat (generally, in addition to what you cook in), and then fill up your plate with vegetables.
    Maybe make him some Whole30 "comfort food" -- chicken soup (I like this one with ginger and garlic:  https://www.stupideasypaleo.com/2014/08/17/healing-chicken-soup-paleo-whole30/), baked potato or sweet potato with ghee or coconut oil and salt, stew, roast. Something warm and comforting and filling.
    We all know logically that eating crappy food won't really help anything, but for many of us, it's our way to comfort ourselves, and that could've started back in childhood, when being sick meant getting special foods that now we associate with making us feel better. We know it's not really true, but it can be really hard to overcome that habit.
     
  21. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from elle_oh_elle in Can I have Primal Kitchen Ranch dressing?   
    Yes, this is fine.
  22. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Tigggersp5 in Olive Oil.... and Balsamic choices   
    With any product, you need to read the ingredients label. Their aged balsamic vinegar is compliant according to what's listed on the website, but always double check the actual bottle you have, in case they've changed recipes or anything. For most balsamic vinegars, they're going to contain sulfites, but as long as they're naturally occurring, it's fine. The ones with added honey or maple would not be because the honey or maple syrup are sweeteners.
    Garlic infused olive oil is compliant.
    Most olive oils are compliant, so if you have one you like, it's probably okay to use. I personally have found California Olive Ranch to be consistently good, decently priced, and available at my regular grocery store, so that's what I use for my extra virgin olive oil.
    If you make your own mayo (which I highly recommend, if you've never done it before -- so much tastier than the store bought ones), you'll want a lighter flavored oil. A light tasting olive oil will work -- some people don't want to use those, which is fine, but it's definitely the cheapest and easiest to find option for a light-flavored oil. Some people prefer to use other oils, like avocado oil or macadamia nut oil -- these will have different flavors, but still should be mild enough for mayonnaise. EVOO makes bitter mayonnaise that most people do not like the taste of.
     
  23. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from tcarson in Recommended Fat Per Meal Question   
    Pick one or two in addition to what you cook in. It's less about if you're lean or not and more about your meals keeping you satisfied for 4-5 hours at a time. There are lean but sedentary people who may do well with less protein, fat, and just generally less food overall. There are larger people who are very active and need more.
  24. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Nicole Lee in PMS strikes!   
    Be sure you're eating enough in general -- most women find that in the week or so leading up to their period and maybe the first day or two of it, they need more food, sometimes even twice as much as they normally eat. This is normal, your body is gearing up to possibly grow a small human, it's craving nutrients that it will need if that happens (even if you are on birth control and know it's not going to happen). If nothing else, try eating an extra helping of starchy vegetable each day, but if that's not enough, go ahead and increase your meals, or throw in an extra meal. 
  25. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from RandiW in Half way minor sabotage   
    Don't beat yourself up! When you don't feel well, it's normal to want comforting things, and if you usually use carby foods as comfort foods, it's normal to want those. 
    It's also possible that because your body is fighting off sickness, it may actually want more food to have the energy and nutrients it needs, so don't be afraid to eat if you're hungry. It's cold and flu season, and you're feeling icky, just do the best that you can. If you have broth or a hot tea you like, try that after dinner if you're sure you aren't actually hungry. Broth or tea either one can be warm, comforting things to have throughout the day as well. (Yes, plain water is better, but a day of lots of tea or broth is not going to be the end of the world here.)
    Hang in there and know that in a day or two, you'll likely be feeling better again, and then you'll be so glad you stuck to it and don't have to start over!