ShannonM816

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  1. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Kiralyn D in 4/2/2018 Starting Whole30   
    There's a thing called extinction burst -- it's your body's last-ditch effort to get you to eat all the things. The second question in this Dear Melissa post talks about it some:  https://whole30.com/2013/07/dear-melissa-cooking-for-two-and-day-ten-tantrums/ -- it talks about it happening around day 10, but it can happen any time. You're also at about the point when food boredom kicks in for a lot of people (see the timeline: https://whole30.com/2013/08/revised-timeline/) so that may be contributing to this too. And those Facebook posts of the different food pictures and videos don't help either. 
    Hang in there, you're so close to the finish line right now -- you can do it!
  2. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Kiralyn D in 4/2/2018 Starting Whole30   
    There's a thing called extinction burst -- it's your body's last-ditch effort to get you to eat all the things. The second question in this Dear Melissa post talks about it some:  https://whole30.com/2013/07/dear-melissa-cooking-for-two-and-day-ten-tantrums/ -- it talks about it happening around day 10, but it can happen any time. You're also at about the point when food boredom kicks in for a lot of people (see the timeline: https://whole30.com/2013/08/revised-timeline/) so that may be contributing to this too. And those Facebook posts of the different food pictures and videos don't help either. 
    Hang in there, you're so close to the finish line right now -- you can do it!
  3. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Advice at day 26 - few gains   
    So, first, 138 is not an unreasonable weight for a 5'5 female, so it might be that losing weight is not going to happen for you -- if you still have bits you feel are a little softer/less defined than you'd like, it might be time to really work on strength training to tone up muscles, although I'm certainly no expert in that, so it's something you might talk to a trusted trainer about.
    Hives and tendon/joint pain might be an indication that something you're eating is still causing some inflammation. If you're keeping a food diary, perhaps expand it to include a note about pain and breakouts each day (or throughout the day, if it changes that much), so you can see if you can link it to any particular foods. Hives in particular would make me wonder about histamine intolerance (read about that here:  https://www.stupideasypaleo.com/2015/09/26/what-is-histamine-intolerance/), joint pain and maybe the hives might also be related to nightshades (read about those here:  https://www.thepaleomom.com/what-are-nightshades/) -- I'm not saying cut all of these things out now, but read the articles, see if they sound like a possibility, and if one of them just really leaps out at you as something that sounds like a possibility, then work on cutting out those foods as much as you can (I know, no one wants to cut out more, I'm sorry). Now having said that -- no one here is a doctor. This is not medical advice. I'm also assuming you have talked to a doctor and ruled out other obvious causes of these things, like an allergy to something in fabric softeners for the hives, or ill-fitting shoes or a weird gait for some of the joint pain. Food is not always the be-all and end-all of everything, sometimes there are other causes for issues.
    As far as sleep, to what extent are you working on good sleep hygiene habits? (Here's some tips:  http://whole9life.com/2015/04/mental-health-sleep-1/) Again, food is not necessarily the only thing going on here -- even if you eat absolutely perfect, squeaky clean meals, if you're stressed, if you're checking your phone right up until bedtime, if your bedroom is not conducive to sleep, you're not going to get good sleep. 
  4. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Kiralyn D in 4/2/2018 Starting Whole30   
    There's a thing called extinction burst -- it's your body's last-ditch effort to get you to eat all the things. The second question in this Dear Melissa post talks about it some:  https://whole30.com/2013/07/dear-melissa-cooking-for-two-and-day-ten-tantrums/ -- it talks about it happening around day 10, but it can happen any time. You're also at about the point when food boredom kicks in for a lot of people (see the timeline: https://whole30.com/2013/08/revised-timeline/) so that may be contributing to this too. And those Facebook posts of the different food pictures and videos don't help either. 
    Hang in there, you're so close to the finish line right now -- you can do it!
  5. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Advice at day 26 - few gains   
    So, first, 138 is not an unreasonable weight for a 5'5 female, so it might be that losing weight is not going to happen for you -- if you still have bits you feel are a little softer/less defined than you'd like, it might be time to really work on strength training to tone up muscles, although I'm certainly no expert in that, so it's something you might talk to a trusted trainer about.
    Hives and tendon/joint pain might be an indication that something you're eating is still causing some inflammation. If you're keeping a food diary, perhaps expand it to include a note about pain and breakouts each day (or throughout the day, if it changes that much), so you can see if you can link it to any particular foods. Hives in particular would make me wonder about histamine intolerance (read about that here:  https://www.stupideasypaleo.com/2015/09/26/what-is-histamine-intolerance/), joint pain and maybe the hives might also be related to nightshades (read about those here:  https://www.thepaleomom.com/what-are-nightshades/) -- I'm not saying cut all of these things out now, but read the articles, see if they sound like a possibility, and if one of them just really leaps out at you as something that sounds like a possibility, then work on cutting out those foods as much as you can (I know, no one wants to cut out more, I'm sorry). Now having said that -- no one here is a doctor. This is not medical advice. I'm also assuming you have talked to a doctor and ruled out other obvious causes of these things, like an allergy to something in fabric softeners for the hives, or ill-fitting shoes or a weird gait for some of the joint pain. Food is not always the be-all and end-all of everything, sometimes there are other causes for issues.
    As far as sleep, to what extent are you working on good sleep hygiene habits? (Here's some tips:  http://whole9life.com/2015/04/mental-health-sleep-1/) Again, food is not necessarily the only thing going on here -- even if you eat absolutely perfect, squeaky clean meals, if you're stressed, if you're checking your phone right up until bedtime, if your bedroom is not conducive to sleep, you're not going to get good sleep. 
  6. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from MissEmilyRae in Food Freedom Reset 4/23/18   
    No one here is a doctor, and this is a pretty specialized concern, so I don't know how much help any of us can be. It may be something that you need to talk to a doctor or nutritionist about.
    This explains the Whole30 stance on calcium:  http://whole9life.com/2012/02/what-about-calcium/ -- if I were looking to make sure I was getting enough, I would look into not just the things that contain calcium, but also the nutrients mentioned in that article that help the body absorb and use the calcium in those foods. So for instance, it doesn't matter if you're taking calcium tablets by the handful every day (not that you should or would), if you're not getting any vitamin d3, your body isn't going to be using all that calcium, which I would imagine would have the same effect for you as not taking any at all -- although again, I'm not a doctor, so this is something you might want to research yourself or talk to a nutritionist about. 
  7. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from suzannes in PMS strikes!   
    Be sure you're eating enough in general -- most women find that in the week or so leading up to their period and maybe the first day or two of it, they need more food, sometimes even twice as much as they normally eat. This is normal, your body is gearing up to possibly grow a small human, it's craving nutrients that it will need if that happens (even if you are on birth control and know it's not going to happen). If nothing else, try eating an extra helping of starchy vegetable each day, but if that's not enough, go ahead and increase your meals, or throw in an extra meal. 
  8. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from BermudaLongTail in Day 14 and ready to be done   
    Why did you want to do whole30 in the first place? If there were particular reasons you wanted to do this, maybe write those down and refer back to them when you start wondering why you're doing this.
    You are an adult, so if you want to quit, that is up to you. Whole30 is not for everyone, and if it's adding more stress to your life, you have to decide if it's worth it.
    One thing that often helps, especially if you have really strong reasons for trying this, is to remind yourself that it isn't that you *can't* have particular foods -- you can have anything you want to -- it's that for 30 days, you're choosing not to have those items. So, you might tell yourself,  I could have cheese if I wanted to, but I'm choosing not to because I want to learn how cheese affects how I'm feeling. 
    As far as portion sizes, remember that the meal template lists ranges, and it's a minimum. As long as you're eating at least 1 palm of protein, 1 thumb of fat, and some veggies, and you're going 4-5 hours between meals easily don't stress about it. For your boyfriend, if he's hungry, he should eat, and you don't worry about him eating too much. Adding more fat and extra starchy vegetables to his meals may help him feel full and keep him satisfied longer.
  9. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Cjcheck in Has anyone decided NOT to weigh themselves after the Whole 30?   
    I think not weighing yourself is a great choice. I get weighed at the doctor's office and they tell me what I weigh, but my personal scale has been up on a shelf in my closet for a couple of years now gathering dust. I have weight to lose, and I know that, but I don't really need to know the exact number of pounds I weigh, or how many I still need to lose, to know if I'm on the right track or not.
    I know when I'm feeling good, physically -- not bloated, gassy, or with aches and pains. I know when I'm feeling good emotionally -- steady moods, motivation to clean the house or work on projects, desire to hang out with friends. I know when I'm feeling in control of food, versus when I feel like it's controlling me. I know whether my clothes are fitting tight or loose, whether my feet are swollen at the end of a work day or not, if my skin is clear or breaking out. All of these things are much more concrete for me than a number on a scale, and I'm much more likely to be motivated to make changes when I don't feel good, or my clothes are all too tight, or if I've suddenly got as many zits as I had back in high school, as opposed to some number that doesn't really mean anything to me other than maybe if I hit it my doctor will quit lecturing me about my weight every time I see her. 
    As for worrying that you'll screw up on day 31 -- first, make a plan, so you don't. Here are some tips for what to do on day 31:  https://whole30.com/finished/. Second, know that at some point in your life, you will almost certainly find yourself falling back into bad habits (I hope you don't, but you'd be the exception, most people do) -- maybe something stressful happens, and you go back to emotional eating, or maybe a weekly glass of wine that seems not to bother you, over time morphs into a daily glass, or two, or more. These things happen, and it's not a sign of failure. It's a sign that you're human. It's an opportunity for you to look at what's going on in your life, and evaluate how you got to where you are, and what you need to do to get back to where you want to be. If you read through all the Dear Melissa blog posts, you'll find that she mentions that it took her multiple Whole30s to get to where she is now -- she didn't do one and then bam, she suddenly had her life figured out and never made any bad food choices ever again. Food Freedom is something you'll figure out over time. Some days you'll feel like you've got it all under control, and then other days, you'll wonder why you're sitting on the couch with an empty potato chip bag and don't remember eating any of them. It's okay, just keep doing the best you can.
  10. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from deviin22 in 4/2/2018 Starting Whole30   
    @humanitysurvey  (and anyone else not really feeling the tiger blood) -- remember that it's not always amazing energizer bunny energy. Sometimes it's just a steady mood, not getting stressed or angry over little things like traffic or something a family member says. Or it might be that you look around and realize that even though you don't feel like you're super energetic, you got the dishes washed, and food prepped for the next day, and laundry done, where before you'd have done maybe one of those things, and then sat on the couch for the rest of the evening until it was time for bed. It can be different for everyone, and non-food stuff can affect it to -- so people with chronic medical conditions, or who are currently under more stress than usual, or who have young children that keep them from getting enough sleep, will not have the same experience as someone who is mostly healthy and can prioritize 8 hours of sleep a night and doesn't have a stressful job or family issues to deal with.  Hopefully you've experienced some kind of improvement in either mood or energy, but if not, it might still happen. Just try not to miss any improvements you might have by focusing on what you haven't seen happen.
    As far as weight, during my first Whole30 I was convinced I was not losing, and maybe even gaining, right up until the very end, and then got on the scale and lost seven or eight pounds. Sometimes that's how it works. I don't know if I really wasn't losing or if it just felt that way, but just relax and see what happens at the end of the month. 
  11. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Cjcheck in Has anyone decided NOT to weigh themselves after the Whole 30?   
    I think not weighing yourself is a great choice. I get weighed at the doctor's office and they tell me what I weigh, but my personal scale has been up on a shelf in my closet for a couple of years now gathering dust. I have weight to lose, and I know that, but I don't really need to know the exact number of pounds I weigh, or how many I still need to lose, to know if I'm on the right track or not.
    I know when I'm feeling good, physically -- not bloated, gassy, or with aches and pains. I know when I'm feeling good emotionally -- steady moods, motivation to clean the house or work on projects, desire to hang out with friends. I know when I'm feeling in control of food, versus when I feel like it's controlling me. I know whether my clothes are fitting tight or loose, whether my feet are swollen at the end of a work day or not, if my skin is clear or breaking out. All of these things are much more concrete for me than a number on a scale, and I'm much more likely to be motivated to make changes when I don't feel good, or my clothes are all too tight, or if I've suddenly got as many zits as I had back in high school, as opposed to some number that doesn't really mean anything to me other than maybe if I hit it my doctor will quit lecturing me about my weight every time I see her. 
    As for worrying that you'll screw up on day 31 -- first, make a plan, so you don't. Here are some tips for what to do on day 31:  https://whole30.com/finished/. Second, know that at some point in your life, you will almost certainly find yourself falling back into bad habits (I hope you don't, but you'd be the exception, most people do) -- maybe something stressful happens, and you go back to emotional eating, or maybe a weekly glass of wine that seems not to bother you, over time morphs into a daily glass, or two, or more. These things happen, and it's not a sign of failure. It's a sign that you're human. It's an opportunity for you to look at what's going on in your life, and evaluate how you got to where you are, and what you need to do to get back to where you want to be. If you read through all the Dear Melissa blog posts, you'll find that she mentions that it took her multiple Whole30s to get to where she is now -- she didn't do one and then bam, she suddenly had her life figured out and never made any bad food choices ever again. Food Freedom is something you'll figure out over time. Some days you'll feel like you've got it all under control, and then other days, you'll wonder why you're sitting on the couch with an empty potato chip bag and don't remember eating any of them. It's okay, just keep doing the best you can.
  12. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from deviin22 in 4/2/2018 Starting Whole30   
    @humanitysurvey  (and anyone else not really feeling the tiger blood) -- remember that it's not always amazing energizer bunny energy. Sometimes it's just a steady mood, not getting stressed or angry over little things like traffic or something a family member says. Or it might be that you look around and realize that even though you don't feel like you're super energetic, you got the dishes washed, and food prepped for the next day, and laundry done, where before you'd have done maybe one of those things, and then sat on the couch for the rest of the evening until it was time for bed. It can be different for everyone, and non-food stuff can affect it to -- so people with chronic medical conditions, or who are currently under more stress than usual, or who have young children that keep them from getting enough sleep, will not have the same experience as someone who is mostly healthy and can prioritize 8 hours of sleep a night and doesn't have a stressful job or family issues to deal with.  Hopefully you've experienced some kind of improvement in either mood or energy, but if not, it might still happen. Just try not to miss any improvements you might have by focusing on what you haven't seen happen.
    As far as weight, during my first Whole30 I was convinced I was not losing, and maybe even gaining, right up until the very end, and then got on the scale and lost seven or eight pounds. Sometimes that's how it works. I don't know if I really wasn't losing or if it just felt that way, but just relax and see what happens at the end of the month. 
  13. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from deviin22 in 4/2/2018 Starting Whole30   
    @humanitysurvey  (and anyone else not really feeling the tiger blood) -- remember that it's not always amazing energizer bunny energy. Sometimes it's just a steady mood, not getting stressed or angry over little things like traffic or something a family member says. Or it might be that you look around and realize that even though you don't feel like you're super energetic, you got the dishes washed, and food prepped for the next day, and laundry done, where before you'd have done maybe one of those things, and then sat on the couch for the rest of the evening until it was time for bed. It can be different for everyone, and non-food stuff can affect it to -- so people with chronic medical conditions, or who are currently under more stress than usual, or who have young children that keep them from getting enough sleep, will not have the same experience as someone who is mostly healthy and can prioritize 8 hours of sleep a night and doesn't have a stressful job or family issues to deal with.  Hopefully you've experienced some kind of improvement in either mood or energy, but if not, it might still happen. Just try not to miss any improvements you might have by focusing on what you haven't seen happen.
    As far as weight, during my first Whole30 I was convinced I was not losing, and maybe even gaining, right up until the very end, and then got on the scale and lost seven or eight pounds. Sometimes that's how it works. I don't know if I really wasn't losing or if it just felt that way, but just relax and see what happens at the end of the month. 
  14. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from deviin22 in 4/2/2018 Starting Whole30   
    @humanitysurvey  (and anyone else not really feeling the tiger blood) -- remember that it's not always amazing energizer bunny energy. Sometimes it's just a steady mood, not getting stressed or angry over little things like traffic or something a family member says. Or it might be that you look around and realize that even though you don't feel like you're super energetic, you got the dishes washed, and food prepped for the next day, and laundry done, where before you'd have done maybe one of those things, and then sat on the couch for the rest of the evening until it was time for bed. It can be different for everyone, and non-food stuff can affect it to -- so people with chronic medical conditions, or who are currently under more stress than usual, or who have young children that keep them from getting enough sleep, will not have the same experience as someone who is mostly healthy and can prioritize 8 hours of sleep a night and doesn't have a stressful job or family issues to deal with.  Hopefully you've experienced some kind of improvement in either mood or energy, but if not, it might still happen. Just try not to miss any improvements you might have by focusing on what you haven't seen happen.
    As far as weight, during my first Whole30 I was convinced I was not losing, and maybe even gaining, right up until the very end, and then got on the scale and lost seven or eight pounds. Sometimes that's how it works. I don't know if I really wasn't losing or if it just felt that way, but just relax and see what happens at the end of the month. 
  15. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from deviin22 in 4/2/2018 Starting Whole30   
    @humanitysurvey  (and anyone else not really feeling the tiger blood) -- remember that it's not always amazing energizer bunny energy. Sometimes it's just a steady mood, not getting stressed or angry over little things like traffic or something a family member says. Or it might be that you look around and realize that even though you don't feel like you're super energetic, you got the dishes washed, and food prepped for the next day, and laundry done, where before you'd have done maybe one of those things, and then sat on the couch for the rest of the evening until it was time for bed. It can be different for everyone, and non-food stuff can affect it to -- so people with chronic medical conditions, or who are currently under more stress than usual, or who have young children that keep them from getting enough sleep, will not have the same experience as someone who is mostly healthy and can prioritize 8 hours of sleep a night and doesn't have a stressful job or family issues to deal with.  Hopefully you've experienced some kind of improvement in either mood or energy, but if not, it might still happen. Just try not to miss any improvements you might have by focusing on what you haven't seen happen.
    As far as weight, during my first Whole30 I was convinced I was not losing, and maybe even gaining, right up until the very end, and then got on the scale and lost seven or eight pounds. Sometimes that's how it works. I don't know if I really wasn't losing or if it just felt that way, but just relax and see what happens at the end of the month. 
  16. Thanks
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Badweatherva in 1st Whole30 started 4/20   
    Have you seen the timeline (https://whole30.com/2013/08/revised-timeline/)? 
    To help with the tiredness, be sure you're drinking plenty of water, salting your food, and eating meals that match the meal template (which may be more food than you're used to, especially if you have a background of dieting/restricting calories/carbs/fat). (You can download the meal template here:  https://whole30.com/pdf-downloads/)
    If the steak helped, be sure you're eating enough protein at each meal --- 1-2 portions the length, width, and height of your palm, or if eggs are your protein for a meal, as many whole eggs as you can hold in one hand. Add 1-2 servings of fat from the list on the template, generally this should be in addition to any fat you cook in as much of that stays in the pan or may get divided between multiple servings. Then lots of veggies of all types. Most people do well with one fist-sized serving of starchy vegetable each day (potato, sweet potato, beets, carrots, turnips, rutabagas, parsnips, or winter squashes like butternut or acorn squash), and people who are very active, who are prone to depression or anxiety, or who are pregnant, nursing, or in the week or so leading up to their period often need more. 
  17. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from CJKWheatbread in Pre/Post WO Plan Help   
    Pre- and post-WO are in addition to your three regular meals. On yoga days you may or may not need a post-wo, depending on how strenuous your workout is. 
    You can download the meal template here:  https://whole30.com/pdf-downloads/ -- it explains what your meals should look like, and what pre- and post-WO meals should be.
    Your pre-WO is fine on running days. Post-WO those days, have a little protein like the egg -- the instructions call for lean protein, some people would just do the egg white here because the fat in the egg is in the yolk. The starchy vegetables post-wo are optional -- you may not need them if you're getting some starchy vegetables each day with meals, or you might feel better having them then, it's something you can test for yourself and see how you feel. This explains some of the theory about post-WO foods:  http://whole9life.com/2015/02/eat-post-workout/  You'd then have breakfast after -- possibly when you get to work, or on the way to work if that's something you can do. (Please don't do anything unsafe to try to eat a meal and drive, though.)
    For yoga days, if you are good eating your breakfast at that time before yoga, that's great. If it turns out that it doesn't work well for you, you could just have the same kind of pre-wo you have on your run days, and then if your yoga is not very strenuous you might be able to just do breakfast after. If your yoga is less relaxing and more challenging, you might find a post-WO helps after these days as well, but again, that's something you can try for yourself.
  18. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from BermudaLongTail in Day 14 and ready to be done   
    Why did you want to do whole30 in the first place? If there were particular reasons you wanted to do this, maybe write those down and refer back to them when you start wondering why you're doing this.
    You are an adult, so if you want to quit, that is up to you. Whole30 is not for everyone, and if it's adding more stress to your life, you have to decide if it's worth it.
    One thing that often helps, especially if you have really strong reasons for trying this, is to remind yourself that it isn't that you *can't* have particular foods -- you can have anything you want to -- it's that for 30 days, you're choosing not to have those items. So, you might tell yourself,  I could have cheese if I wanted to, but I'm choosing not to because I want to learn how cheese affects how I'm feeling. 
    As far as portion sizes, remember that the meal template lists ranges, and it's a minimum. As long as you're eating at least 1 palm of protein, 1 thumb of fat, and some veggies, and you're going 4-5 hours between meals easily don't stress about it. For your boyfriend, if he's hungry, he should eat, and you don't worry about him eating too much. Adding more fat and extra starchy vegetables to his meals may help him feel full and keep him satisfied longer.
  19. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from 30Rookie in FIRST TIMER - Starting 4/9/18   
    Hi, @30Rookie -- a couple of things you might try next time this situation happens. First, if you know you need to eat by a certain time before you leave, set a timer so you don't forget. Second, be sure there's food made up ahead of time so you can just grab it without a lot of thought or prep, so you have no excuse not to eat a real meal, even if you have to just grab the food out of the fridge as you walk out the door. Eating vegetables at 3:00 to tide you over was not a bad idea, but I would say to be sure this isn't happening often. The recommended three template meals (plus pre- and post-workout if you're working out) are the minimum amount of food you ought to be eating each day. Skipping one meal one day in your Whole30 is not the end of the world, but if it happens often, you'll end up undernourished and feeling tired and run down, which is not what we want you to experience at all. If you find yourself on the go a lot and needing to take food with you to eat, you probably don't want to rely on Larabars. Many people keep hard boiled eggs in the fridge so they can grab a few of those to take with them, or cans or pouches of tuna or salmon or chicken, packets of olives, compliant jerky, pre-cut vegetables, even leftovers can work, it's just a matter of planning ahead.
  20. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from suzannes in Day 25, but I have been eating foods sabotaging my Whole30. Should I start over?   
    First, don't feel guilty. These kinds of changes can be very difficult. 
    Should you start over? Well, that really depends on you. Here's what I would do, at least for the last few days of your Whole30. At that point, decide whether to keep going or not. As long as you haven't eaten anything that isn't allowed, you can do reintroductions if you want to, or you can keep going for as long as you want to.
    First, make sure your meals are big enough that you're easily going 4-5 hours between meals. This may be more food than you're used to eating, but you're going to cut out between-meal snacks, so that's okay. It's so much easier not to eat between meals when you know you're not really hungry.
    Second, think about getting all the nuts out of your kitchen if you can't resist them. This isn't necessarily permanent, but for now, look at the things you have around that are easy to snack on, that you reach for even if you're not hungry, and make it hard to get them, which usually involves keeping them out of the house. If you really, really need them for recipes, buy only as much as you need for recipes you'll be making in the near future, and keep them someplace hard to get to -- top shelf of a cabinet where you have to go get a stepladder to get to them, for instance.
    Third, think of things you can do when you have an urge to go into the kitchen and get food during times you know you're not hungry. (If you're not sure if you're hungry or not, think about whether you'd eat something bland and boring, like plain steamed fish and broccoli. If you would, you're really hungry -- grab some leftovers or an egg or a handful of olives to eat. If you wouldn't eat that, you're probably not really hungry. Drink some water, and walk away from the kitchen.) Things you can do instead of eat include things like journaling, meditating, going for a walk, calling a friend to chat, reading  a book, working on a hobby, doing some exercise, cleaning something -- come up with a list of things that you can do that will keep your hands and brain busy for a bit until the feeling of wanting to eat passes. When you want to eat but know it's just boredom or habit, not hunger, pick something off the list to do instead.
    Finally, this is all a process. It takes time, and sometimes, despite your best efforts, you may realize you're eating out of boredom or because you're stressed or whatever. That's okay, just figure out why it happened, make a plan to help it not happen again, and keep going. 
  21. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Hope4Overcomers in New to forums and on Day 10 - Eek!!! I need Encouragement!   
    This is pretty typical, and day 10 is the day people are most likely to quit (see the timeline:  https://whole30.com/2013/08/revised-timeline/)
    If you're tired of so much cooking, look for things that don't take a lot of prep, and maybe plan a meal out at the end of the week somewhere that you can plan for a compliant meal. Things that are easy to make could be sheet pan dinners, where you just throw everything on a pan and into the oven, or something you cook in the crockpot all day like a roast or a whole chicken or some pulled pork, combined with veggies that you can chop up during the day when you have a few minutes and then cook easily by throwing them into the oven to roast, or even things like coleslaw or potato salad that you can make up early in the day or the night before and just leave in the fridge until meal time. If the weather is conducive to it and you have a grill, maybe over the weekend cook enough meat for several meals on the grill (or have hubby do it if that's his thing), so you have some options you don't have to cook. 
    Plan a nice meal out somewhere -- places that serve steak or nice seafood places would probably have some good options, just look around and see what's available.
    Or plan a meal swap with your kids and their spouses -- everyone make double or triple recipes of a meal, and meat up over the weekend to swap, so you have some variety to choose from.
  22. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from samalope in Feeling Discouraged   
    If this is a big change from how you were preparing food before, it can take some time to get used to, but the meal planning will get easier.
    What you might try is keeping some frozen stuff on hand -- frozen vegetables, burger patties, chicken -- so that as you get later in the week you can just fix those, rather than going back to the store. By a couple of weeks in you should have a better feel for how much you're eating too -- it can seem like a lot of food, especially a lot of vegetables, but you will actually eat all of it. 
    There are lots of "how to stock your pantry" type of blog posts out there, look for paleo or Whole30 specific ones, but don't just rush out and blindly buy everything they say. Consider what they recommend and how you could use those items, and then get the things that will let you have non-perishable food on hand for times when something goes wrong and due to lack of planning or a random bad cooking day you find yourself searching for something quick and easy. Tuna, salmon, olives, some canned veggies, pickles, olive oil, a couple of kinds of vinegar for dressings, and a few favorite spices or spice blends will go a long way toward putting a meal together in a hurry, or allowing you to change up a recipe when you realize you forgot an ingredient or something went bad faster than expected.
    There are a couple of helpful posts linked on this page:  https://meljoulwan.com/paleo-101/  -- look for Great Ingredients: No Recipe Required for some ideas for easy to put together meals, Stocking Up for a little more about guesstimating how much food you might need for a week, and The Method Behind My Madness for a helpful way to plan and cook for a week at a time.
     
  23. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from 30Rookie in FIRST TIMER - Starting 4/9/18   
    Hi, @30Rookie -- a couple of things you might try next time this situation happens. First, if you know you need to eat by a certain time before you leave, set a timer so you don't forget. Second, be sure there's food made up ahead of time so you can just grab it without a lot of thought or prep, so you have no excuse not to eat a real meal, even if you have to just grab the food out of the fridge as you walk out the door. Eating vegetables at 3:00 to tide you over was not a bad idea, but I would say to be sure this isn't happening often. The recommended three template meals (plus pre- and post-workout if you're working out) are the minimum amount of food you ought to be eating each day. Skipping one meal one day in your Whole30 is not the end of the world, but if it happens often, you'll end up undernourished and feeling tired and run down, which is not what we want you to experience at all. If you find yourself on the go a lot and needing to take food with you to eat, you probably don't want to rely on Larabars. Many people keep hard boiled eggs in the fridge so they can grab a few of those to take with them, or cans or pouches of tuna or salmon or chicken, packets of olives, compliant jerky, pre-cut vegetables, even leftovers can work, it's just a matter of planning ahead.
  24. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from sweetcee in Cheese vs other dairy?   
    This definitely sounds like it could be a reaction to dairy. It might be the cheese, or the cumulative effects of small amounts of dairy throughout the day if you did the yogurt and half and half the same day. And yes, reactions can happen hours after the fact. 
    If you need to take something like Imodium or another anti-diarrheal medicine to get through your work day, you can. Other than that, lots of water, and stick to easy to eat foods like plain chicken, bananas, or baked or mashed potatoes.
    I hope you feel better soon
  25. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from GoJo09 in Longer reintroduction this time around   
    Yes, this is fine -- three days of Whole30 eating will hopefully be plenty of time, but if you don't feel 100% at that point, delay further reintroductions, just so you know that any symptoms you're having are a result of the reintroduced foods, not leftover from the stuff you were reintroducing before, if that makes sense.
    Soy is definitely in all kinds of things. I had to restart a Whole30 once after I found it in some tea. Tea! Why was there soy in my tea? (I might still be a tiny bit bitter about that.) So it makes sense to find out how you react to it so you know whether it's something you want to avoid completely, or if it's okay in small amounts occasionally.