ShannonM816

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  1. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Kombucha   
    The article SugarcubeOD listed is the final word on this. We had a discussion among the moderators with Melissa about this in March or April of this year to clarify exactly what the rule was, since several of us had some questions about this based on our previous understanding, and Melissa's ruling was that we cannot actually know what the label means based on where the sugar is listed in the ingredients list because there are no actual rules governing how the labels were worded, and that it is easiest all the way around to say, if there's sugar on the label, you cannot have it during your Whole30. 
  2. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Mike V in No sugar added Publix brand bacon?   
    Those are all okay.
    For future reference, you can check the Common Additives Cheat Sheet or google Whole30 plus any ingredient you have questions about and you'll probably find past discussions -- most anything you can think of has been asked about before.
  3. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from ladymath in Captain Log....Day 5   
    My favorite source of recipes is this site, or the author's Well Fed cookbooks:  http://meljoulwan.com/recipes-index/
    You might also like Nom Nom Paleo --  http://nomnompaleo.com
    There is definitely a learning curve for cooking this way if it's not your usual way of cooking, but once you learn more about spices and sauces, you'll find things you like almost as much as soy sauce and sriracha. 
    Do remember that you don't need to make fancy meals. Find a taco seasoning recipe, make a pound of ground beef with it, pile that on a salad with your favorite leafy greens, tomatoes, shredded carrots or broccoli slaw, diced jicama, celery, bell peppers if you like them,and any other veggies that sound good to you, top it all with a big scoop of guacamole (remember that you each want half to a whole avocado per serving).
    Or do burger patties with tomatoes, pickles, lettuce, mayo,  mustard, wrapped in lettuce or collard green leaves, with a side of roasted potatoes or sweet potatoes.
    It doesn't have to be too complicated, just have some protein, some healthy fat, and lots of veggies.
  4. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from SoccerLover in How bad is ibuprofen?   
    If you need to take ibuprofen, take it. There's no reason to be in pain. 
  5. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Madeleine Robinson in Whole30 through grief   
    I'm sorry to hear about your dog.
    People can decide it's the right time or the wrong time for a Whole30 for all kinds of reasons, and no one can tell you whether now is a good time to do it or not. If you decide it's just not right for you right now, that's okay. The whole point of doing Whole30 is to make yourself healthier, but sometimes the stress of sticking to the rules and cooking the food and doing the dishes, when it's coupled with other stressful stuff in your life, could negate a lot of the benefits you'd normally get.
    What I will say, though, is that at some point, you'll want to think about the idea of comfort foods. I'm an emotional eater myself, so I get it -- when you're having a rough time, you want something familiar and comforting, and it's so tempting to have mac & cheese or mashed potatoes or whatever your particular comfort food is. But the reality is, those foods only provide fleeting moments of comfort. They're not going to change the diagnosis, they're not going to make that diagnosis any easier to deal with, they're not really going to change anything, and often, people find they indulge in some less than healthy food for comfort, and then end up feeling guilty about it, which means now they're still dealing with whatever stuff they needed comfort from, plus a feeling of guilt on top of that. Whenever you decide to do a Whole30, consider other comforting options you could turn to instead of food -- it can be anything, really. A big part of why certain foods are comfort foods is just tradition -- they're what someone fed you when you were younger when you were ill or feeling down. As an adult who knows those foods are not the healthiest, you can decide to change your tradition and find something other than food to use in those situations. So it could be a bubble bath, or talking to someone about what you're feeling, or meditation or journaling, getting a massage, spending a day in your pj's reading your favorite book, taking a class you've wanted to take, going to a local museum or botanical garden, hanging out with friends. Just come up with some options that work for you, that make you feel like you're doing something special for yourself to give yourself a little extra self-care when you need it. 
  6. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Emma/Baileys in Can I have green juice   
    Yes, a splash of juice in water is fine. Here is a link to some articles with other beverage ideas:  https://whole30.com/tag/drinks/
    Do remember to have plain water most of the time, just have these other things occasionally to change things up a bit.
  7. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Emma/Baileys in Spending WAY too much time with food prep/cooking   
    so I was wrong, it's not FODMAPs she addressed -- in Well Fed 2, she lists at the back of the book modifications to make the recipes AIP compliant.  That means she tells you how to leave out/sub for eggs, ghee, nuts, seeds, tomatoes, eggplant, sweet & hot peppers, cayenne pepper, paprika, and seed spices like allspice, cardamom and others that come from seeds. Each recipe in the book is listed and will either have the modifications listed, will say it's good to go, or will say it cannot be made AIP compliant. So it might be helpful for you, although you'll have to remember to flip to the back of the book and look at the modifications.
    You might also check out this article about the Paleo Autoimmune Cookbook (unfortunately, the link to the book preview doesn't seem to work anymore), or the website of the author of it, Autoimmune Wellness. Thepaleomom.com also has a section of AIP recipes. These aren't all Whole30, but some of them are, or could easily be changed to be.
     
  8. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Madeleine Robinson in Whole30 through grief   
    I'm sorry to hear about your dog.
    People can decide it's the right time or the wrong time for a Whole30 for all kinds of reasons, and no one can tell you whether now is a good time to do it or not. If you decide it's just not right for you right now, that's okay. The whole point of doing Whole30 is to make yourself healthier, but sometimes the stress of sticking to the rules and cooking the food and doing the dishes, when it's coupled with other stressful stuff in your life, could negate a lot of the benefits you'd normally get.
    What I will say, though, is that at some point, you'll want to think about the idea of comfort foods. I'm an emotional eater myself, so I get it -- when you're having a rough time, you want something familiar and comforting, and it's so tempting to have mac & cheese or mashed potatoes or whatever your particular comfort food is. But the reality is, those foods only provide fleeting moments of comfort. They're not going to change the diagnosis, they're not going to make that diagnosis any easier to deal with, they're not really going to change anything, and often, people find they indulge in some less than healthy food for comfort, and then end up feeling guilty about it, which means now they're still dealing with whatever stuff they needed comfort from, plus a feeling of guilt on top of that. Whenever you decide to do a Whole30, consider other comforting options you could turn to instead of food -- it can be anything, really. A big part of why certain foods are comfort foods is just tradition -- they're what someone fed you when you were younger when you were ill or feeling down. As an adult who knows those foods are not the healthiest, you can decide to change your tradition and find something other than food to use in those situations. So it could be a bubble bath, or talking to someone about what you're feeling, or meditation or journaling, getting a massage, spending a day in your pj's reading your favorite book, taking a class you've wanted to take, going to a local museum or botanical garden, hanging out with friends. Just come up with some options that work for you, that make you feel like you're doing something special for yourself to give yourself a little extra self-care when you need it. 
  9. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Meiyonce in Plated fats   
    Pick a couple of the fat portions listed on the template, in addition to whatever you cook with. If with some meals you have more than that because it just sounds good -- like you make salad and want avocado and ranch dressing and some sunflower seeds for crunch -- that's fine. As long as you're eating a meal, with protein, fats, and vegetables, you're unlikely to consistently overeat fats, because in that context, you're going to naturally feel satiated and not still want something more, the way you might if you're eating empty calories.  
    In general, you should aim to go 4-5 hours between meals comfortably. If you're hungry before then, your meals need to be bigger, which might mean more fat or more protein or more veggies or all of the above. If you're regularly going six hours or more before you're even starting to feel hungry, then your meals may be a little too big. 
  10. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from MeadowLily in Vitamin Deficiencies?   
    These things are things you probably need to see a doctor about. The angular cheilitis sounds like something that may not go away on its own, and they definitely need to rule out any major underlying causes of the hair loss and nail issues, such as thyroid problems. These things are just not something we can help you diagnose or treat, since none of us are doctors.
    That said, if you want to continue whole30, I'd suggest listing out a couple of day's worth of meals, including approximate serving sizes and specific vegetables you've eaten, how much water you drink, whether or not you exercise and if so what you're doing for pre- and post-workout meals, so we can make sure you're on the right track. I don't know what you mean by eating adequate calories, whole30 doesn't pay attention to that, we ask you to follow the meal template, which is linked in my signature below.
     
     
  11. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Shauni10 in Any and all advice   
    Hi, @Shauni10. Don't stress too much about the cooking -- I know it can be overwhelming at first, but cooking is just a skill like any other skill that you can learn. You may never be someone who loves to cook (or you might find you do, it happens), you may never be the kind of inspired chef who makes up recipes on the fly (but that's okay, you don't need to), but you can for sure be a competent cook who is capable of preparing tasty, healthy foods. Take your time when you're in the kitchen, read through recipes completely before you get started, and get all your ingredients lined up (even measured out, if you've got enough space for it) before you start, be sure you have everything you need so you don't get halfway through and then realize you forgot something important. 
    If you'll eat canned tuna or salmon, they're nice to keep on hand because you can make tuna or salmon salad easily, or just eat them straight out of the can if you're really hungry. When you buy salmon, if the thought of dealing with the skin and bones grosses you out, look for some that is boneless and skinless -- it'll typically be in the same kind of flatter can that tuna usually comes in, whereas the taller cans of salmon will typically have the bones and skin (at least in my experience, always read the labels carefully to know what exactly you're getting). 
    Eggs are typically easy to cook. Scrambled is by far the easiest, but if you like hard boiled eggs, doing a bunch of those at once to keep in the fridge gives you an easy protein source when you don't want to cook. 
    I like to keep frozen chicken and burger patties in the freezer -- the ones I buy have instructions for how to cook them from frozen, so they're easy to do if I've messed up dinner or just don't feel like making anything complicated. They're not the most exciting meals around, but either of those, paired with steamed frozen vegetables, served with some mayo or guacamole for fat will do the job.
     
     
  12. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from Barb Owens in Construction Worker lunches needed   
    These are for kids, so the serving sizes will be too small, but maybe you can get some ideas: http://nomnompaleo.com/paleolunchboxes
    If he wants something warm, you might want to invest in a thermos or some kind of insulated lunchbox, but if he's okay with cold food, really, anything can be eaten cold, it really just depends on his taste and what he's okay with. (I know you said lunch box, but I'm assuming he uses a cooler -- if it's truly just a non-insulated lunch box, mayo-based stuff is not a good idea, which would change some of these suggestions.) Leftover chicken or burger patties or meatballs or frittatas. Hard boiled eggs. Roasted vegetables can be eaten cold, or look for hearty salads -- things like potato salad, coleslaw, broccoli salad. Regular salads are fine too, but be sure they're huge or include heartier vegetables in addition to the leafy greens, or they may not keep him satisfied through the afternoon. And definitely include a couple of servings of fat -- a whole avocado if he likes them, heaping handfuls of olives, mayo, salad dressings or dips (even if he doesn't have a salad, he can pour them over his food or use them as a dip). 
    I'm assuming he's pretty active for work, so err on the side of packing more than you think he'll need, at least for the first week or so -- better he have too much food the first few days, and then you can adjust from there, rather than have him end up hungry part way through the afternoon with no compliant foods available.
  13. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from harrahv in Trader Joes Ghee...Compliant or Not Compliant??   
    All ghee is made from butter, so it all technically contains milk for labeling purposes, it's just that in the process of making it, the most problematic parts of the milk are strained out, which is why it's okay on whole30.
     
  14. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from harrahv in Trader Joes Ghee...Compliant or Not Compliant??   
    All ghee is made from butter, so it all technically contains milk for labeling purposes, it's just that in the process of making it, the most problematic parts of the milk are strained out, which is why it's okay on whole30.
     
  15. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from RandiW in How much is too much - fruits & fats   
    If you're eating template-based meals, including one or two servings of fat in addition to what you cook with in each meal, you're unlikely to eat too much fat. The real test is that you should be able to comfortably go 4-5 hours between meals before getting hungry. If you're getting hungry before then, your meals are probably too small, and if you're going 6 or more hours before you even think about food, you may be having too much fat.
    As for fruit, the recommendation is for up to two fist-sized servings a day, with meals, not on its own. In the summer, when there's a wide variety of fruits available and at their peak of ripeness, you may find yourself eating more, and that's okay, just be sure you're still eating protein, fat, and vegetables as well. 
  16. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from smiths37 in So tired and headaches   
    Are you salting your food? If not, start there. When you go to a mostly unprocessed diet, you're suddenly getting  a lot less salt than the typical American diet contains, and we do need some salt. The things you've described -- the tiredness and fuzzy headedness -- can be symptoms of low sodium. They can be other things as well, and no one here is a doctor, so if that persists, you really, really need to talk to a medical professional. 
    Do you think your water adds up to 1/2 oz per pound of body weight (so if you weigh 120 lbs, you need at least 60 oz of water)?
    I think your meals look well composed in terms of the mix of protein, fat, and vegetables, but may be a little on the small side, but it's kind of hard to tell. Let's take your breakfast casserole for an example, though -- you've used 12 eggs and 4 sausages, and divided that into 8 servings, so you get 1.5 eggs and 1/2 a sausage in each serving. If you were only having eggs for protein, you'd want as many as you can hold in one hand, which is probably 3-4. If you were having just the sausages, you'd probably want more than one for a serving. So you're having at best a half serving of eggs, and less than half a serving of sausage. Maybe try dividing your casserole into 6 instead of 8 pieces in the future. You probably need more veggies than you're getting in each serving too. And for fat, a serving of avocado is half to a whole one, so if they're small, go ahead and have the whole thing. The amount of oil you cooked the veggies in or greased the casserole dish with doesn't really add up to much once it's divided up into servings.
    The apple at breakfast -- if you want it with your meal, have it with the meal. If you're not hungry enough for it with the meal, save it to have with lunch. If you're hungry between breakfast and lunch, a better option would be to have a smaller serving of protein, fat, and vegetables, or at least two of the three.
    Your meal 2, it looks like the only added fat is the guacamole. Again, a serving of avocado for our purposes is half to a whole avocado, so 2 TBSP of guac is on the low side.
     
     
     
     
  17. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from smiths37 in Going to a June BBQ need recipe ideas   
    Check out the different links in this post: https://meljoulwan.com/2014/06/29/4th-july-paleo-picnic-potluck-recipes/  -- she's covered salads and meats and sauces, so you'd have lots of options, depending on what you're wanting to focus on. If you google Whole30 potluck, you'll find a lot of past discussions in the forum as well. 
  18. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from RandiW in Losing weight and not wanting to   
    The meal template is a minimum. You can definitely eat more than that. Definitely add more fat to your meals, and you may need a starchy vegetable at most meals, not just once a day. 
    Here's some more tips for how to keep weight on during whole30.
     
  19. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from RandiW in How much is too much - fruits & fats   
    If you're eating template-based meals, including one or two servings of fat in addition to what you cook with in each meal, you're unlikely to eat too much fat. The real test is that you should be able to comfortably go 4-5 hours between meals before getting hungry. If you're getting hungry before then, your meals are probably too small, and if you're going 6 or more hours before you even think about food, you may be having too much fat.
    As for fruit, the recommendation is for up to two fist-sized servings a day, with meals, not on its own. In the summer, when there's a wide variety of fruits available and at their peak of ripeness, you may find yourself eating more, and that's okay, just be sure you're still eating protein, fat, and vegetables as well. 
  20. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from LindaS in sulphites in Vinegar approved ?   
    If it's in the ingredients, it's added and not okay.  If, after the ingredients list or somewhere separate from it, it says Contains Sulfites, it's naturally occurring. 
  21. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from arapp in Clear skin before Whole30, Acne on Whole30   
    Is there any food you're eating now that you didn't eat before Whole30, or a food that you used to eat occasionally and are suddenly eating a lot more of? Maybe if there's something like that, it's contributing to the breakout? I think I've heard of people noticing breakouts and finding it's the bpa in the lining of cans of coconut milk, and now I can't find that discussion anymore, but it was somewhere here on the forum. Maybe someone else will have better luck finding it, or know if I'm at least remembering correctly. 
  22. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from satanic.dad in Whats everyones favorite thing to eat when they're sick?   
    I don't always follow the recipe exactly, but I like the addition of ginger and turmeric in this chicken soup recipe.  I definitely add more garlic, and sometimes some lemon zest.  Baked potato mashed up with ghee or olive oil and salt, baked sweet potato with coconut oil and cinnamon. Hot tea with lemon, or look for Throat Coat tea.
    Be sure you drink plenty of liquids, get lots of rest, and go to the doctor if you need to, especially if you think there's any chance it may be strep -- that's not something to mess around with, you'd want to get it treated quickly before it gets bad. Gargling with salt water may help some too.
     
  23. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from crl206 in WeightWatcher on Whole30   
     
    It probably won't hurt anything to add some fat to either of those. With the salad especially, think about how sometimes dressing is left in the bottom of the bowl when you're done, so you didn't actually eat all of it.
     
    I would add fats to make things taste good. If you think an avocado or some olives or even some chopped nuts or sunflower seeds sound good in your salad, go ahead and add them. If you think some homemade tartar sauce would be good with your salmon cakes, have some.
     
    The best indicator for whether you're eating enough is really how you feel between meals. If you can go 4-5 hours between meals, and you're just starting to get hungry around that 4th hour, you've got the right mix of stuff. If you're getting hungry 2-3 hours after a meal, you probably need to increase something, and if you're sure you're eating enough vegetables and enough protein, then increase the fat. If you're going 7-8 hours easily between meals without feeling hungry at all, then you may have overdone it a bit and should scale back the fat in the next meal.
  24. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from AlpineViking in Starting June 19th   
    @sojurabbit you definitely don't have to follow a lot of fancy recipes. Maybe pick one or two a week if you have time, but otherwise keep it simple. On a day off, grill or bake a bunch of chicken. Brown a pound or two of ground beef. Make up a big breakfast casserole (http://paleomg.com/easy-breakfast-casserole/). Wash and chop vegetables so all you have to do at meal time is cook them. As much as you can, make your meals and their meals overlap. So serve protein and veggies you can eat, let them have rice or bread or cheese. See if you can get the toddler to eat compliant ranch dressing instead of your usual brand, so you can eat off their plate if the food waste bothers you. 
  25. Like
    ShannonM816 got a reaction from emilyelowe in In the ditch...   
    This is pretty common. It's hard to change a lifetime of tastes and habits, and very, very easy to just go back to what you're used to and you're most comfortable with.
    You may need to just take things one meal at a time for a while. Get up in the morning and make yourself a good breakfast. Don't think about going a certain number of days or meals. If you have something unhealthy for one meal or snack, that's okay. It's not something to worry about or feel guilty about. Just try to make the next meal after that a healthy one.
    You can get back on track. And you can figure out a way to eat healthy even if your family isn't 100% behind you. It's just going to take some time and probably some trial and error as you work out what your personal food freedom looks like.
    If you want to read more about life after whole30, there are free resources online here:  https://whole30.com/step-four-finished/ . You might also be interested in the book Food Freedom Forever.