Suzy

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  1. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in If You Ever Thought of Giving Up Trying to Lose Weight   
     
    I just wanted to dip back into this post again.  I'm sorry that I was the last person to post in here six months ago.     I think of this thread a lot, actually.  I am now in a different phase of my health journey and wanted to share with you what is going on and how I feel now. 
     
    I am now more convinced that most people should only do a whole30 once or twice in their lives, to figure out food intolerances and move forward with that knowledge.  I think this is the intent of the Hartwigs, but I think a lot of people use the Whole30 as a way to suppress appetite and lose weight.  I abused the W30 for this purpose and I'm now more in touch with how skewed my body image was.    I have always thought that accepting oneself is the best way to go, but I didn't follow that advice.  Now I'm going to give Golda Poretsky another chance, as well as the link mentioned by HollyBee.  I really want to learn to release my food and body image hang ups.  Any advice is appreciated! 
  2. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from marcykay in Plan a Whole30 dream vacation   
    Right now, I'm obsessed with New Orleans. I know at first glance you might not think that this is the town for an ultimate W30 vacay, but I've been reading about roux-less gumbos and rich, delicious stews with local seafood, sausage, and chicken. I would hit all the fancy restaurants and be completely annoying to the wait staff by asking what is in all the food (and a condition of my vacation is not to feel bad about asking for what I want). Then, I would focus on all the history and jazz. I'd take long, long hikes all around the city, exploring sections of town and soaking up the culture. Immersing myself in culture will really reinforce my good habits by taking the focus further off numbers on the scale and food I can't have. Each day I would react to feedback from my body by getting massages and doing some stretching in beautiful outdoor spots. Hopefully a gator won't eat me while I'm in downward dog!
  3. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from YumYumZari in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    . . . quickly avert their eyes and change web pages when they accidentally stumble upon paleo dessert recipes.
    . . . get excited and too chatty when they see a fellow grocery shopper with grass fed beef and coconut oil in his or her basket.
    . . . develop a thick skin to righteously indignant vegans and vegetarians. Thinks to themselves, "I wish them well, but just wait until they see my new bod and energy."
  4. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from Artmistress in Whole30 with inflammatory bowel disease   
    I just want to say that all three of you top posters are incredibly courageous. Robin, your Mom is a hero. That was so inspiring!
    It's so empowering to know your situation and to work with it, not in spite of it. These are the only bodies we'll ever have! I have irritable bowl syndrome and lifelong dysthymia (low level depression) which I believe are linked. Since doing my W30 in August, I found complete remission in my depression and a vast improvement in my digestion. This time around, I'm part of the Whole100 group, and I'm looking forward to completing it with a diet low in FODMAPS. I'm hoping to see my gut heal like never before, and get rid of that terrible pain and bloating I experienced on a daily basis.
  5. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from Espie in The crazy things people say   
    HA! "Pizza wheat."
  6. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from Espie in The crazy things people say   
    I just love that Whole9 opens up all these new avenues in the mind for day to day problem solving. It takes thinking and creativity to use ginger tea and coconut water when we always used corn syrupy sodas when we were kids. It takes guts to overcome the traditions that are emotionally comforting, but bad for health. After a couple of years of Whole9 living, I'm sure all of this stuff is going to be second nature and will become exciting new traditions that we can share with our families.
    Oh, and I have a new post about the weird GOOD things that people say about Whole9. I have a co-worker who, whenever he sees me with a steak or ribs, says, "I gotta get on that caveman diet. What's for lunch today, brontosaurus ribs that tilt your car over like Fred Flintstone? I could get down like that." Ha! I've got to remember to emphasize the fact that I eat tons of veggies, too.
  7. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in If You Ever Thought of Giving Up Trying to Lose Weight   
    A Whole30 is not a plan for weight loss, but rather a template for overall better health that might include losing weight for those that need it. I just wanted to share a place I went before I stumbled upon Whole9 with the people who are struggling with weight issues. It was a dark, horrible place for me.
    My weight profile was the most common one in first world countries: I was overweight, teetering on the brink of obesity. I actually was technically obese, being 5'5 and about 194 at my worst. What got me up to that number was binging and dieting, over and over in a cycle. It's a boringly familiar story.
    From Spring 2011 to January of last year, I was on Weight Watchers. WW is THE worst thing you can do if you want a healthy relationship with food. It makes you obsess about food volume and arbitrary point-counting (the points system is designed to keep what you're eating a mystery and keep you reliant on WW for life). And WW changes their program, just ever so slightly, every couple of years, so you have to buy all their new program material to keep up. And no one who works at WW will tell you about that. You have to find that out on your own and quit eventually. Then the next bunch of desperate, overweight people, mostly women who just want to be valued by society, file into these horrible meetings. Ugh. I needed to rant about that, thanks.
    So, there I was after WW this time last year. I thought, maybe this is just how I am. I missed the slim youth boat. At 32, I felt old and fat. So I just tried to pick up the pieces from years of yo-yo dieting and try and accept. I found this site: http://www.bodylovewellness.com/ I'm sorry to the well-meaning Golda Poretsky who created this, but this was the deepest point of despair, the darkness before the dawn, that helped me search for health instead of being ok with being sick and fat. This woman is a life coach for obese women. She says that it's ok to be fat. It is NOT okay to be fat. Being obese is your body's way of telling you that your lifestyle is WRONG for you. She says to love yourself, you have to give up. I say to love yourself, sometimes you have to change yourself. The thing that helps the most is realizing that certain foods out there are addictive, like sugar and flour, and getting away from them will give you a clarity you've never experienced before.
    I found Whole9 in summer of 2012. I lost over thirty pounds in a period of about 5 months. It was an awesome experience that I can't shut up about. With another Whole30 (actually a W100), I'm losing more.
    What do you think about changing in order to love yourself? The act of changing things IS love to me.
  8. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in If You Ever Thought of Giving Up Trying to Lose Weight   
    A Whole30 is not a plan for weight loss, but rather a template for overall better health that might include losing weight for those that need it. I just wanted to share a place I went before I stumbled upon Whole9 with the people who are struggling with weight issues. It was a dark, horrible place for me.
    My weight profile was the most common one in first world countries: I was overweight, teetering on the brink of obesity. I actually was technically obese, being 5'5 and about 194 at my worst. What got me up to that number was binging and dieting, over and over in a cycle. It's a boringly familiar story.
    From Spring 2011 to January of last year, I was on Weight Watchers. WW is THE worst thing you can do if you want a healthy relationship with food. It makes you obsess about food volume and arbitrary point-counting (the points system is designed to keep what you're eating a mystery and keep you reliant on WW for life). And WW changes their program, just ever so slightly, every couple of years, so you have to buy all their new program material to keep up. And no one who works at WW will tell you about that. You have to find that out on your own and quit eventually. Then the next bunch of desperate, overweight people, mostly women who just want to be valued by society, file into these horrible meetings. Ugh. I needed to rant about that, thanks.
    So, there I was after WW this time last year. I thought, maybe this is just how I am. I missed the slim youth boat. At 32, I felt old and fat. So I just tried to pick up the pieces from years of yo-yo dieting and try and accept. I found this site: http://www.bodylovewellness.com/ I'm sorry to the well-meaning Golda Poretsky who created this, but this was the deepest point of despair, the darkness before the dawn, that helped me search for health instead of being ok with being sick and fat. This woman is a life coach for obese women. She says that it's ok to be fat. It is NOT okay to be fat. Being obese is your body's way of telling you that your lifestyle is WRONG for you. She says to love yourself, you have to give up. I say to love yourself, sometimes you have to change yourself. The thing that helps the most is realizing that certain foods out there are addictive, like sugar and flour, and getting away from them will give you a clarity you've never experienced before.
    I found Whole9 in summer of 2012. I lost over thirty pounds in a period of about 5 months. It was an awesome experience that I can't shut up about. With another Whole30 (actually a W100), I'm losing more.
    What do you think about changing in order to love yourself? The act of changing things IS love to me.
  9. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in If You Ever Thought of Giving Up Trying to Lose Weight   
    This sparked such a great discussion. Everything everyone is saying is really touching and familiar to me. And thank you for thanking me. That brought tears to my eyes. I really had no idea that anyone would be that touched by my struggle.
    Blissing, thank you for your contrasting opinion. I think self acceptance is one thing, but accepting obesity for yourself is another. I don't feel, and never felt, like a bodily condition was ever part of who I am intrinsically. When I have an illness or a sprain, I think of these as temporary conditions. Some conditions are lifelong. Obesity can be one of those things that attaches itself to you, like a virus. After a while, you think you have no way out and in your mind, you are "fat." I have to disagree with the thinking that being overweight is not a medical condition. It so is. People who are obese are at greater risk for many other medical conditions, not to mention feeling isolated and developing depression and anxiety. Maybe even worse things. So many conditions are interconnected. We don't have to start treating all of them at once, but I bet if you dig deeper, you'll find them all connected. For instance, my depression was caused by food sensitivities which caused weight gain which caused eventual obesity. This is why W9 was such a blessing to me; it treats the whole individual. Don't sell yourself short by not trying to get everything you can from life.
    My word choices of "sick and fat" mean just that. I was sick AND fat. I should have mentioned this in the post (I actually mentioned it right after my first W30 in my post in Success Stories) I had arthritis symptoms, depression, anxiety, couldn't sleep, food sensitivities, low energy, rosacea, OH! and horrible IBS that I wasn't even aware of until I was making tons of cabbage and broccoli on my first W30! During my current W30, I've eliminated FODMAPs, thereby reducing gut inflammation even further. Awesome self knowledge.
    Lauraska, your story touches me deeply. I'm so glad you are finding relief with this way of eating. Weight Watchers truly is an evil institution designed to reap money from people, mostly women, who are desperate to lose weight. I'm really curious to hear what your family thinks now that you've pinpointed your problem. Are they sorry they thought you were lying? Lately, I've been expressing what I need to express to my family and friends and I'm calling it by name. I'm saying things like, "I'm angry that you didn't say you're sorry."
    Also, I do think body composition is different for everyone, and standards are just horribly ridiculous. We all know when we feel our best, and we're all just trying to get there and stay there. For instance, remember the controversy over the regular sized Dove models? Why was that a controversy again? We just have to sit down with ourselves and decide what's reachable, what LIFESTYLE we want (very important), and when to compromise and accept.
  10. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in If You Ever Thought of Giving Up Trying to Lose Weight   
    Getting out there and living life and doing things like going dancing has to do with body image, not BMI. My point was that working on self esteem sometimes will involve changing unhealthy habits that have lead to unhealthy states, such as obesity. Loving myself while giving myself every chance at happiness in life is the prescription I'm calling in for myself. I want to feel the best I can, I want to be attractive to other people and myself, and I want to make it up the stairs without having to stop and breathe hard at the top.
    My first Whole30 made it possible for me to ditch my scale almost totally. I have not weighed myself since October 2012. This has been one of the best advantages for me, since now I can focus on my body's feedback rather than some number. It really is a magical feeling, not having to weigh myself all the time.
  11. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in If You Ever Thought of Giving Up Trying to Lose Weight   
    Those were the things I said that I believe were the most offensive to people. I still hold to what I said, now more than ever, actually, since I see how psychologically damaged some people can get over talking about fat. Maybe society needs more talk about excess fat instead of tiptoeing around it. I wasn't saying that being 20 or even 40 extra pounds overweight was going to kill a person in and of itself, I was saying that being overweight is an indicator that a person hasn't been as healthy as she could be. When I healed my bad food habits, I gained muscle and got leaner. And I'm not skin and bone, girlfriends, I'm 162 lbs of womanly, muscular triumph! I don't need to get thinner than this. I like what I eat and my level of exercise and this is me now. I healed my lifestyle, thereby healing my body. See?
  12. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in If You Ever Thought of Giving Up Trying to Lose Weight   
    This thread still bothers me sometimes in my quiet moments, so I've gone back to make sure I wasn't persecuting anyone for being fat. I'm pretty sure I wasn't doing that since I was fat, too. Duh. I'm not a "fatist." My friends and relatives are fat, and I love them. I attach no moral judgments to what I deem as excess body fat. Oh, and if weight loss discussion is a trigger for your body issues, maybe you shouldn't click on and follow a post about weight loss, but stick to the other thousands of posts on this lovely forum.
    I was rereading ISWF, like I do every fortnight and found that excess adipose tissue is actually almost considered a separate endocrine producing organ. They said that if you have excess fat, especially belly fat, you are pretty much guaranteed to have chronic systemic inflammation. If this isn't the precursor to disease, I don't know what is, and my name is f***ing Jenny Craig.
  13. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in If You Ever Thought of Giving Up Trying to Lose Weight   
    Hear hear! I typed earlier, but had to edit because I couldn't say it well, that when we bump up against something uncomfortable, we have to follow that feeling to the root cause. Not paying attention to the uncomfortable things will get you a lot of stagnation in life.
  14. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in If You Ever Thought of Giving Up Trying to Lose Weight   
    Well, I for one love myself to death and always have.  I have always had tons of self-criticisms and fallen prey to negative self talk, but I've always wanted to look, feel, be, live, and give back to others better than I have the day before.  I'm saying that I've always been a sunflower craning its blossom to the light.  My genes have made it very hard for me to be happy and comfortable; I've had major depressive disorder since I was about 10 and I will always have to deal with it in some form until I die.  I hardly ever feel totally okay, so when I felt some relief in my symptoms and a drop in excess fat after Whole30, I was happy about that.  I think this program will get your body and your genes right; you're going to wind up where you should be, whatever size that is.  I'm learning about epigenetics now and how traditional foods can switch on the good genes and deactivate some the bad ones that cause disease.  I'm very interested in this since diabetes, obesity, mood disorders, and heart disease are rampant in my family.  I want to give myself and any future children of mine the very best chance at health and positive body image. 
     
    And I wouldn't change a thing about my body, past or present.  I'm so grateful I got to be obese because it led me to seek a better way to eat and live than how I had always done.  From there I found good, traditional foods and a whole lifestyle of self love.  Thank you, Dallas and Melissa!  
  15. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from abbyn in The crazy things people say   
    Good lord. People come through my line all the time at Trader Joe's, trying to impress me (I guess because I look "natural" and work at TJ's) by telling me they're vegetarians. I also think they do it to see who is in their "tribe" of veggies. And when I say I eat grass fed meats a lot of times they say, "Oh, I do too, sometimes." What? Pick a team, you anemic flip-flopper.
    People are always trying to make other people's eating habits their business. I'm no exception, but I try to wait to be invited before I critique . . . unless they make personal comments about my food choices first, then I do my best to defend my choices and Whole9. There are tons of people who think I'm crazy, but they're mostly fat girls. Ha. Sorry, that was mean.
  16. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from YumYumZari in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    . . . quickly avert their eyes and change web pages when they accidentally stumble upon paleo dessert recipes.
    . . . get excited and too chatty when they see a fellow grocery shopper with grass fed beef and coconut oil in his or her basket.
    . . . develop a thick skin to righteously indignant vegans and vegetarians. Thinks to themselves, "I wish them well, but just wait until they see my new bod and energy."
  17. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from songbirdemd in The crazy things people say   
    A co-worker who has severe central obesity, PCOS, and horrible mood-swings: "Wow, Suz! You look so good! Your pants are baggy you've lost so much weight! And your skin looks incredible. What are you doing to get that way?? I wanna lose weight!"
    I went into the Whole30 and how much I love it, but then I said, "I respect that you're a vegetarian. You can actually modify your diet to make it a little more compliant without eating meat. You would have to give up grains and eat a lot of eggs."
    Me, a couple days later: "I can't tell you how happy I am doing a Whole30. Have you given any thought to it? We can do it together!"
    Her: "I'M NOT DOING YOUR STUPID MEAT DIET! And I think it's really boring to talk about weight all the time!!!"
    Who brought up weight? She did. I just left it alone after that. However, I heard that she's been giving her own version of the Whole30 around my workplace and has gotten several people to think of me as kind of a food nut. Whatevs. I lead by quiet example now, as Melissa has suggested.
    Another thing that bothers me is the people that are really worried that I'm depriving myself and that I can't sustain this kind of effort for long. Soon, they think, I'll binge on cream horns. I'm not saying I haven't slipped, but I've kept my weight off and inflammation down for the most part. I'm learning new things and getting better every week. I love my lifestyle, and that's what counts.
    For the road: Mom: "So there aren't very many foods you can actually eat." Says the woman with only broccoli and spinach in her veggie repertoire.
  18. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in If You Ever Thought of Giving Up Trying to Lose Weight   
    A Whole30 is not a plan for weight loss, but rather a template for overall better health that might include losing weight for those that need it. I just wanted to share a place I went before I stumbled upon Whole9 with the people who are struggling with weight issues. It was a dark, horrible place for me.
    My weight profile was the most common one in first world countries: I was overweight, teetering on the brink of obesity. I actually was technically obese, being 5'5 and about 194 at my worst. What got me up to that number was binging and dieting, over and over in a cycle. It's a boringly familiar story.
    From Spring 2011 to January of last year, I was on Weight Watchers. WW is THE worst thing you can do if you want a healthy relationship with food. It makes you obsess about food volume and arbitrary point-counting (the points system is designed to keep what you're eating a mystery and keep you reliant on WW for life). And WW changes their program, just ever so slightly, every couple of years, so you have to buy all their new program material to keep up. And no one who works at WW will tell you about that. You have to find that out on your own and quit eventually. Then the next bunch of desperate, overweight people, mostly women who just want to be valued by society, file into these horrible meetings. Ugh. I needed to rant about that, thanks.
    So, there I was after WW this time last year. I thought, maybe this is just how I am. I missed the slim youth boat. At 32, I felt old and fat. So I just tried to pick up the pieces from years of yo-yo dieting and try and accept. I found this site: http://www.bodylovewellness.com/ I'm sorry to the well-meaning Golda Poretsky who created this, but this was the deepest point of despair, the darkness before the dawn, that helped me search for health instead of being ok with being sick and fat. This woman is a life coach for obese women. She says that it's ok to be fat. It is NOT okay to be fat. Being obese is your body's way of telling you that your lifestyle is WRONG for you. She says to love yourself, you have to give up. I say to love yourself, sometimes you have to change yourself. The thing that helps the most is realizing that certain foods out there are addictive, like sugar and flour, and getting away from them will give you a clarity you've never experienced before.
    I found Whole9 in summer of 2012. I lost over thirty pounds in a period of about 5 months. It was an awesome experience that I can't shut up about. With another Whole30 (actually a W100), I'm losing more.
    What do you think about changing in order to love yourself? The act of changing things IS love to me.
  19. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in If You Ever Thought of Giving Up Trying to Lose Weight   
    A Whole30 is not a plan for weight loss, but rather a template for overall better health that might include losing weight for those that need it. I just wanted to share a place I went before I stumbled upon Whole9 with the people who are struggling with weight issues. It was a dark, horrible place for me.
    My weight profile was the most common one in first world countries: I was overweight, teetering on the brink of obesity. I actually was technically obese, being 5'5 and about 194 at my worst. What got me up to that number was binging and dieting, over and over in a cycle. It's a boringly familiar story.
    From Spring 2011 to January of last year, I was on Weight Watchers. WW is THE worst thing you can do if you want a healthy relationship with food. It makes you obsess about food volume and arbitrary point-counting (the points system is designed to keep what you're eating a mystery and keep you reliant on WW for life). And WW changes their program, just ever so slightly, every couple of years, so you have to buy all their new program material to keep up. And no one who works at WW will tell you about that. You have to find that out on your own and quit eventually. Then the next bunch of desperate, overweight people, mostly women who just want to be valued by society, file into these horrible meetings. Ugh. I needed to rant about that, thanks.
    So, there I was after WW this time last year. I thought, maybe this is just how I am. I missed the slim youth boat. At 32, I felt old and fat. So I just tried to pick up the pieces from years of yo-yo dieting and try and accept. I found this site: http://www.bodylovewellness.com/ I'm sorry to the well-meaning Golda Poretsky who created this, but this was the deepest point of despair, the darkness before the dawn, that helped me search for health instead of being ok with being sick and fat. This woman is a life coach for obese women. She says that it's ok to be fat. It is NOT okay to be fat. Being obese is your body's way of telling you that your lifestyle is WRONG for you. She says to love yourself, you have to give up. I say to love yourself, sometimes you have to change yourself. The thing that helps the most is realizing that certain foods out there are addictive, like sugar and flour, and getting away from them will give you a clarity you've never experienced before.
    I found Whole9 in summer of 2012. I lost over thirty pounds in a period of about 5 months. It was an awesome experience that I can't shut up about. With another Whole30 (actually a W100), I'm losing more.
    What do you think about changing in order to love yourself? The act of changing things IS love to me.
  20. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in Into the Great Ocean of Possibilities   
    Eating super processed food is never, ever worth it (unless there is literally no other option all day - which is so rare it has not happened yet).  That's a lesson that I've finally learned.  It doesn't matter how cheap it is, how convenient it is, how small a portion it is, or how many other people are eating it around me.  I've made myself quite ill over the past couple of months and I'm ready to return to the healthful way of eating.  In short, Velveeta is not cheese and I'm never eating it again. 
     
    I'd really, really like to get another Whole30 going.  Why not?  I've only done one all the way through so far and didn't successfully complete the reintroduction phase.  I think a Whole30 should not be considered done until this crucial phase is complete.   
  21. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in Into the Great Ocean of Possibilities   
    Welcome to my Post-Whole30 Log! Thank you to anyone who reads this; you'll be helping me focus on making my life a lot healthier. X
    Death to chronic inflammation!
    Let's get started.
    I've been eating mostly paleo for a whole year now! What I've gained and learned this past year:

    I've managed to lose and keep off a significant amount of fat (I would say about 20 lbs., but I broke up with my scale, so I couldn't say for sure).
    I learned how to reduce inflammation in my body and that sugar is the actual Devil for me. I believe that it's consumption is the cause of a lot of emotional symptoms for me. This is the greatest part of my journey.
    The principles of Whole9 are there so I can strive for balance in all areas of life. Rest, exercise, and socialization are areas that need a lot of improvement. Now that I'm aware, I can do triage on the effects of stressors in my life.

    Going forward, I will build on what I now know. The things I want to gain and learn for myself over the next year are:
    I'd like to get the best natural body I can for my lifestyle and lose and keep off the rest of my excess body fat. Since I've learned that excess weight around the middle is an endocrine manufacturing machine, I'm on a mission to negotiate it off my body. I would like to exercise daily as a habit for my emotional and physical health.
    I'd like to get my emotions under control. I'm an angry, sad, anxious person for a week, or even two, out of the month. I need some serious help with the symptoms of what is called PMDD. I'm more than a little suspicious of established psychiatry, but also suspicious of the effectiveness of supplemental herbs and vitamins. It's always seemed to me that the best I can do would be to eat right, get out in the sunshine, exercise, and express my emotions in a daily journal. Psychiatry is such a nebulous science that I'd rather stay away from it as much as I possibly can. If my symptoms become unbearable again, I may have to resort to hormone medication or other pharmaceuticals. I'm not morally against it, I just want what's best in the long term for my body. I suppose that drugs could confuse the delicate system of the human body, which so many factors could disrupt. I have a lot of fear that I'll do more damage than good and that I'll feel terrible for months until I can quit the meds and get back to nature.

    Yesterday, I went to our delightful local health food store, Nature's Market, where I talked to the owner, Jeff. He's a caring, older man who happens to be very self-educated with vitamins, herbs, and health in general. He knows about the most readily absorbed forms of vitamins and which herbs have had the most studies done on them. He's a wealth of knowledge. He and his wife are such lovely people, that they can see through my temperamental and introvert tendencies. I talked to them for a long time and left with only a Vitex tincture and a Solgar multivitamin, Female Multi, which includes lots of magnesium, vitamin D3, B-complex, and herbs including Vitex. I was averse to taking a multi, since Dallas and Melissa say that only a few are needed to supplement a diet. However, I haven't been the best vegetable eater over the last year and probably have some deficiencies across the board. For someone who loves a paleo diet, I focus too much on protein. So, my plan over the next year is to up my veggies and fresh fruits and practically ditch my precious dried fruits by only using them in recipes. So, I'll be taking a separate D3 and magnesium, when I can afford the latter (so damn expensive!).
    So, the Vitex tincture seemed to really work! It's supposed to balance out hormones. My period also came last night, so that could have been the reason for the feelings of relaxation I was getting. Also has a bit of alcohol, which could have taken the edge off.
    Speaking of alcohol, now's the time to introduce some off plan things that don't trigger me now and again. I've never had an issue with consuming too much alcohol, and I really enjoy the flavors and relaxing qualities of wine and (very rarely) rum and tequila. I think I'll be consuming wine roughly once or twice a week this summer. I'm glad ISWF highlighted for me that wineries have paid for the studies that said alcohol was good for you. I see a lot of people come through my line at Trader Joe's with 6 cases of Charles Shaw Cabernet because they think it's good for them to have two glasses every night. Great job in business, wineries. I personally don't feel good about deluding people, so I always tell them about how the studies were paid for when it comes up. No one likes a know-it-all cashier, but there you go.
    Other off plan, non-trigger foods (at least I don't think they trigger yet) will be grass-fed cheese, plain yogurt, and butter. Rice, potatoes, gluten-free bread, and oatmeal definitely make me want to eat more and more so they're out. A couple squares of very dark chocolate does not make me want more, but it has added refined sugar which is definitely out because of my serious inflammatory issues (IBS, stiffness, tendonitis, premenstrual swollen breasts, etc.). I'll have cocoa powder and cacao nibs in a recipe if I need chocolate. Or if I can find chocolate sweetened with fruit juice or something, I will try it.
  22. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in IBS -- warning contains graphic language   
    Are you following the low FODMAP protocol?  I have to do this.  Cauliflower "rice" and I can never be together.      But there's plenty of other delicious food to eat out there. 
  23. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in If You Ever Thought of Giving Up Trying to Lose Weight   
     
    I just wanted to dip back into this post again.  I'm sorry that I was the last person to post in here six months ago.     I think of this thread a lot, actually.  I am now in a different phase of my health journey and wanted to share with you what is going on and how I feel now. 
     
    I am now more convinced that most people should only do a whole30 once or twice in their lives, to figure out food intolerances and move forward with that knowledge.  I think this is the intent of the Hartwigs, but I think a lot of people use the Whole30 as a way to suppress appetite and lose weight.  I abused the W30 for this purpose and I'm now more in touch with how skewed my body image was.    I have always thought that accepting oneself is the best way to go, but I didn't follow that advice.  Now I'm going to give Golda Poretsky another chance, as well as the link mentioned by HollyBee.  I really want to learn to release my food and body image hang ups.  Any advice is appreciated! 
  24. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from MeadowLily in If You Ever Thought of Giving Up Trying to Lose Weight   
    A Whole30 is not a plan for weight loss, but rather a template for overall better health that might include losing weight for those that need it. I just wanted to share a place I went before I stumbled upon Whole9 with the people who are struggling with weight issues. It was a dark, horrible place for me.
    My weight profile was the most common one in first world countries: I was overweight, teetering on the brink of obesity. I actually was technically obese, being 5'5 and about 194 at my worst. What got me up to that number was binging and dieting, over and over in a cycle. It's a boringly familiar story.
    From Spring 2011 to January of last year, I was on Weight Watchers. WW is THE worst thing you can do if you want a healthy relationship with food. It makes you obsess about food volume and arbitrary point-counting (the points system is designed to keep what you're eating a mystery and keep you reliant on WW for life). And WW changes their program, just ever so slightly, every couple of years, so you have to buy all their new program material to keep up. And no one who works at WW will tell you about that. You have to find that out on your own and quit eventually. Then the next bunch of desperate, overweight people, mostly women who just want to be valued by society, file into these horrible meetings. Ugh. I needed to rant about that, thanks.
    So, there I was after WW this time last year. I thought, maybe this is just how I am. I missed the slim youth boat. At 32, I felt old and fat. So I just tried to pick up the pieces from years of yo-yo dieting and try and accept. I found this site: http://www.bodylovewellness.com/ I'm sorry to the well-meaning Golda Poretsky who created this, but this was the deepest point of despair, the darkness before the dawn, that helped me search for health instead of being ok with being sick and fat. This woman is a life coach for obese women. She says that it's ok to be fat. It is NOT okay to be fat. Being obese is your body's way of telling you that your lifestyle is WRONG for you. She says to love yourself, you have to give up. I say to love yourself, sometimes you have to change yourself. The thing that helps the most is realizing that certain foods out there are addictive, like sugar and flour, and getting away from them will give you a clarity you've never experienced before.
    I found Whole9 in summer of 2012. I lost over thirty pounds in a period of about 5 months. It was an awesome experience that I can't shut up about. With another Whole30 (actually a W100), I'm losing more.
    What do you think about changing in order to love yourself? The act of changing things IS love to me.
  25. Like
    Suzy got a reaction from marcykay in Plan a Whole30 dream vacation   
    Right now, I'm obsessed with New Orleans. I know at first glance you might not think that this is the town for an ultimate W30 vacay, but I've been reading about roux-less gumbos and rich, delicious stews with local seafood, sausage, and chicken. I would hit all the fancy restaurants and be completely annoying to the wait staff by asking what is in all the food (and a condition of my vacation is not to feel bad about asking for what I want). Then, I would focus on all the history and jazz. I'd take long, long hikes all around the city, exploring sections of town and soaking up the culture. Immersing myself in culture will really reinforce my good habits by taking the focus further off numbers on the scale and food I can't have. Each day I would react to feedback from my body by getting massages and doing some stretching in beautiful outdoor spots. Hopefully a gator won't eat me while I'm in downward dog!