GlennR

Members
  • Content Count

    1015
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    6

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    GlennR reacted to Lara Secchin in Can I have Tucupi and tapioca?   
    I am not trying to create any problems here, I'm just about to share my own opinion.
    I am also from Brazil and doing the Whole30, and even though tapioca flour is allowed I have personally decided to not eat the tapioca that looks like a tortilla. But I have to disagree that this is a bread like product or stuffed like a taco, and the reason I say that is: people that started eating that (hundreds of years ago - maybe thousands) never ever had bread or taco. If you go to native tribes in Brazil (the ones that don't usually have contact with western culture at all), tapioca and fish are the main food. As much as it looks like tortillas or tacos, tapioca is unique, I have lived in the US for a couple of years and not for a single moment while I ate a taco or burrito, I thought about tapioca and vice versa. The taste is different, the texture is waaaaaaay different, the feeling I have when I eat them (while eating and after) is different. I understand that for Americans the stuffed tapioca could be a bread like product or even resemble a taco, but for us Brazilians it is not. That's my opinion, and I think it sounds reasonable. However I have decided to not eat them, just for the sake of it, and if I have decided to have them, I would be ok with that.
  2. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from lriggs724 in Can I have Tucupi and tapioca?   
    *Shrug.* What this is telling me is that the rules will have to evolve as Whole30 expands further out into the world. Whole30 was formed largely as a response to the Standard American Diet, and some of its rules are therefore parochial to this culture -- but SAD is not the way most of the world eats. So issues like this will keep cropping up the more Whole30 goes international, and the guidelines will have to be more adaptable if Whole30 is to thrive. My $.02.
  3. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from Juliana Paiva in Can I have Tucupi and tapioca?   
    Okay, this one I don't get. This isn't a faux tortilla that was made compliant. It's its own thing, a traditional food already made of compliant ingredients. There's no danger it will tempt or lead you to something else.
    It's similar to questions I have about other non-Western foods that Whole30 might disallow -- like the Ethiopian kabalagala, which would probably also be forbidden because it's pancake-like or pastry-like. But this is a traditional food (often made with compliant ingredients) that is not trying to be anything else.
    Seems to me issues of SWYPO don't apply. Mightn't some allowance be made in such cases?
  4. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from lriggs724 in Can I have Tucupi and tapioca?   
    *Shrug.* What this is telling me is that the rules will have to evolve as Whole30 expands further out into the world. Whole30 was formed largely as a response to the Standard American Diet, and some of its rules are therefore parochial to this culture -- but SAD is not the way most of the world eats. So issues like this will keep cropping up the more Whole30 goes international, and the guidelines will have to be more adaptable if Whole30 is to thrive. My $.02.
  5. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from lriggs724 in Can I have Tucupi and tapioca?   
    *Shrug.* What this is telling me is that the rules will have to evolve as Whole30 expands further out into the world. Whole30 was formed largely as a response to the Standard American Diet, and some of its rules are therefore parochial to this culture -- but SAD is not the way most of the world eats. So issues like this will keep cropping up the more Whole30 goes international, and the guidelines will have to be more adaptable if Whole30 is to thrive. My $.02.
  6. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from aprilb in One Good Whole30 choice I made today is:   
    Bacon burger for breakfast. Bacon in anything is always a good decision.
  7. Like
    GlennR reacted to snarky in Salsa and sardines   
    Thank you Shannon. 
    This Whole30 thing might not be as scary as I imagined
     
  8. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from jmcbn in Salsa and sardines   
    For a moment there I thought this was a new and offbeat -- but intriguing -- recipe.
  9. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from jmcbn in Salsa and sardines   
    For a moment there I thought this was a new and offbeat -- but intriguing -- recipe.
  10. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from ExpatElle in New Lara Bars   
    How I imagine the thought process usually goes:
    "Mmm. Larabars. Better get a bunch in case I have a food emergency."
    Later: "Oh, no! A food emergency! Good thing I bought those larabars!"
  11. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from ExpatElle in New Lara Bars   
    How I imagine the thought process usually goes:
    "Mmm. Larabars. Better get a bunch in case I have a food emergency."
    Later: "Oh, no! A food emergency! Good thing I bought those larabars!"
  12. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from Robin R. in Tuna without soy?   
    Actually, the best way to find stuff is to Google "Whole30 + topic." Good luck with the next 27 days.
  13. Like
    GlennR reacted to kirkor in New Lara Bars   
    I've done at least 4 or 5 W30s and I still don't understand all these food emergencies that people are always concerned about. 
  14. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from Tom Denham in Legit general question re Whole30   
     
    That's another layer of complexity in the elimination process which you may or may not include in your first Whole30. It was only after my first Whole30 that I zeroed in on how some nightshades (peppers, especially) caused skin rashes and itchiness for me. They're technically Whole30 compliant, but they did not apparently, agree with me -- and so I avoid them now. It's up to you how restrictive you want to be. The experiment will be as unique as you are.
  15. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from NoMoreCrunchyCravings in Forgive me Whole30, for I have sinned...   
    In my culture, it's traditional for people returning from a trip to bring home gifts to family and friends (pasalubongs). It's also traditional to throw them a welcome home celebration (usually so you can, you know, get the gifts). So last Saturday, I made dinner (Whole30 compliant) for my sister and her family after their trip to Japan and South Korea, and of course they brought goodies (non-compliant but delicious) from their travels:
     
    July 10 - After dinner, we sampled green tea and butter sponge cake (from Japan), a variety of crispy rice treats (from South Korea), and these oddly flavored Kit Kat bars they have in Japan, like wasabi Kit Kats and green tea Kit Kats.
     
    July 11 and 12 - Ate my way through my gift stash of melon and green tea Kit Kat bars. I figured rather than space them out, just binge on them and polish them off all at once. I'm a fan of getting the most out of your misdeeds. As Martin Luther said, "Sin boldly."
     
    Besides, a couple of family members have birthdays coming up, which means non-compliant restaurant meals are looming. Gotta make room for these upcoming offroad transgressions.
     
    (Can you tell I grew up Catholic?)
  16. Like
    GlennR reacted to LydiaJo in Lox salmon   
    I love having scrambled eggs with lox. It was a Sunday brunch favorite when there wasn't enough lox for everyone.
  17. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from NoMoreCrunchyCravings in Forgive me Whole30, for I have sinned...   
    Bacalao, A Love Story
     
    Bacalao is a traditional Spanish-derived stew in some regions of the Philippines; it is typically made with salted cod, tomato sauce, diced potatoes, sliced roasted red bell peppers, garbanzos, green peas, etc. It takes half a day to cook (a full day if you include prep work and clean up), with the ingredients having to go into a pot of slow-heated olive oil in strict succession and with perfect timing to meld the flavors right. My grandmother used to make a batch of this on rare occasions when I was growing up -- usually during Christmas or Lent. She didn't make it often, not just because it was so time consuming to make, but because the ingredients were rather expensive, particularly the olive oil and the cod, both of which were imported from colder climes. It was always therefore a luxury and a treat when she would serve it for dinner, or dole out containers of the stew to each family in our clan, to be brought home and savored and stretched out, since it might be a long time before she could make it again.
     
    My grandmother, like most traditional cooks, made bacalao the way she had been taught by her mother, who had been taught by her mother before that, going back who knows how many generations. As she grew older and frailer, it worried me that the recipe might be lost, since for some reason she had not passed on the knowledge to any of her daughters or step-daughters. So when I grew up, I brought her to my house and had her cook up a batch as I took notes, thus preserving the way of cooking this beloved family dish when she finally passed away.
     
    In time, I have cooked this dish myself many times, getting better at approximating my grandmother's cooking with each batch. Indeed, it is now my traditional Christmas gift to my family. Every holiday season for the past number of years, I've set aside a whole day to make a big pot of bacalao and parcel them out in tubs and giving them to my family, at or just before Christmas, for them to enjoy throughout the holiday season. Rather than handing out more material things that we all already have more than enough of, I thought that this would be a better gift: the gift of my time, the gift of tradition, the gift of connection to lost or distant family, the gift of memories of Christmases past. And it's a gift for me, too, for when I spoon bacalao on sliced pan de sal (Filipino bread roll), with each bite I myself am blessed with all of these and more.
     
    Oh, and it's delicious.
     
    I've already made this year's pot of bacalao and gifted them out -- and kept some for myself to indulge in and be grateful for. I like and follow the Whole30 way of eating, and I know (from the knowledge gained from the program) that eating something like bacalao has its costs. But some things just matter more, some things supersede mere health and functionality, some things are worth it.
     
    Happy Holidays to you!
  18. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from Real Food Y'all in Forgive me Whole30, for I have sinned...   
    May 14 - Made Nom Nom Paleo's strawberry banana ice cream for a family dinner. SWYPO plus almond extract.
     
    Here's an exercise in logic: The danger of SWYPO is that the fake, not as good (even though technically compliant) food will just make you crave the original, unhealthy thing. So then, if the faux item is just as good as or even better than the "real" thing, then problem solved: there's no possibility of being tempted by the bad original because the fake is in no way inferior. SWYPO becomes SWoutYPO, and you and your healthy ice cream can live happily ever after, right?
     
    Right?
  19. Like
    GlennR reacted to sdawson in How can you tell you are in fat burning mode?   
    Ok, no more weighing, and I'm keeping on after this 30 days to a whole60 and more until I feel as good as I can.
  20. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from Chellie in Forgive me Whole30, for I have sinned...   
    Okay, tongue firmly in cheek there. But it sort of fits. I'm continuing with Whole30; I decided early on not to do a formal reintroduction of many forbidden items since I don't plan to re-incorporate them into my regular diet. But I will go off-plan now and then due to necessity or choice, and I wanted a place to register these "transgressions" and note down their effects on me -- so I have a running log of how various foods affect me. Thus, this is my confessional. :-)
     
    Okay, so first off-plan item:
     
    May 8 - Added 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract to a blueberry clafouti I had for breakfast. No discernible effect.
     
    Off to a good start!
  21. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from Real Food Y'all in Forgive me Whole30, for I have sinned...   
     
    Oooh, that's a thought! 
     
    But no: the idea of SWYPO is ain't nothin' like the real thing. I think you're thinking about food with no brakes.
     
    Yeah, the jargon can get confusing sometimes. (And vaguely cult like...)
  22. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from Real Food Y'all in Forgive me Whole30, for I have sinned...   
    May 14 - Made Nom Nom Paleo's strawberry banana ice cream for a family dinner. SWYPO plus almond extract.
     
    Here's an exercise in logic: The danger of SWYPO is that the fake, not as good (even though technically compliant) food will just make you crave the original, unhealthy thing. So then, if the faux item is just as good as or even better than the "real" thing, then problem solved: there's no possibility of being tempted by the bad original because the fake is in no way inferior. SWYPO becomes SWoutYPO, and you and your healthy ice cream can live happily ever after, right?
     
    Right?
  23. Like
    GlennR reacted to Real Food Y'all in Have I erased all the good I did?   
    I'm here with you, sholmes! My weekend (OK, actually the past 5 days) was a whirlwind of donuts, brownies, pasta, and cookies.
    Why are weekends so much harder?
     
    Swimming back to shore right now!
  24. Like
    GlennR reacted to Xandra in Have I erased all the good I did?   
    If you're like me, some of this comes from feeling like "Why do I have to miss out on everything? I've been good for so long now. Everyone else gets to eat this fun food, why do I always have to say no?"
    And the truth is that everyone else gets to live with the consequences of their unhealthy choices, too. And for me, at least, I haven't really been eating well compared to how many years I ate all of the unhealthy foods and ingrained those into my lifestyle.
    I'd suggest when you come back to W30, pay attention to healthy foods that you enjoy and can use as an alternative when you want a comfort dish: sweet potatoes, a perfect steak, a blended soup. Anything to reinforce the idea that you don't need to feel deprived when you eat healthy foods. It takes a long time to build up memories of comfort, so start building your new memories now.
  25. Like
    GlennR got a reaction from doedoechachacha in Binge eating - how do I break this nasty cycle?   
    I have a different perspective on all this. I think we're actually designed to binge eat, because for much of our evolutionary history, food was feast or famine for us. Think about it: If your clan kills a mammoth, you're going to stuff yourselves with mammoth meat as long and as hard as you can before it spoils. Because there will be times when mammoth are scarce and you're nibbling on bugs. You should read accounts of feasts or potlatches among tribal cultures, where they literally ate themselves into unconsciousness. So everyone who has a "problem" with binge eating, give yourself a little bit of a break. You're not defective. You're following the urgent dictates of millennia of evolutionary adaptation.
     
    In fact, my radical suggestion is that if you feel the compulsion to binge eat, I say go for it. The old axiom holds: that which you resist becomes stronger, and the more you fight it, the more strongly it will overwhelm you in the end. So just roll with it. But when you do go for it, don't go for the junk. Do it compliant and balanced. That is, the same proportions of protein, veggies, and fats as the template suggests -- just big, even huge portions. Whole30 meals writ large. If you eat clean, there will be a natural stopping point, because as someone once wrote (sorry, I forget who), you can put away endless slices of pizza, but you're never going to eat more than two or three times the amount of meat you normally do.
     
    I'm a small, lean guy, and I normally eat like a sparrow, but even I have on rare occasions started eating at one end of the table and finished at the other. At those times, everyone would be asking where the heck I was putting it away. As long as the food was not pure crap, I would feel really gorged, but not necessarily sick, and by the next day I would be fine. And you know what? I would hardly eat the next few days, so my food intake during that time span would average out.
     
    Take this thought with all the necessary caution. There will be people for whom this is the worst possible idea. But really, you're going to binge eat anyway at some point, right? We all do, because we're devouring human animals. We just might as well do it smart.