Deb.

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  1. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from little mighty in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    You tell people to bulletproof their tea because you have no milk in the house. 
  2. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from little mighty in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    You tell people to bulletproof their tea because you have no milk in the house. 
  3. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from frantastic in What A Serving of Eggs Looks Like   
     
    I don't eat eggs at all ever as I am doing the Auto Immune Protocol. 
    I eat a regular meal for breakfast, whatever I would eat at another meal. Steak, chicken fish, fat, salad, a bunch of veggies, yum. 
    Plenty of recipes to be had on Google for Whole 30 breakfasts with no eggs. 
    Enjoy!
     
    PS I can hold a whole chicken in one hand. 
  4. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from frantastic in What A Serving of Eggs Looks Like   
     
    I don't eat eggs at all ever as I am doing the Auto Immune Protocol. 
    I eat a regular meal for breakfast, whatever I would eat at another meal. Steak, chicken fish, fat, salad, a bunch of veggies, yum. 
    Plenty of recipes to be had on Google for Whole 30 breakfasts with no eggs. 
    Enjoy!
     
    PS I can hold a whole chicken in one hand. 
  5. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from little mighty in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    You tell people to bulletproof their tea because you have no milk in the house. 
  6. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from MeadowLily in The crazy things people say   
    My favorite is "well what CAN you eat"
     
    I say "meat, fish, chicken, fruit and vegetables" 
     
    Then they don't know what to say.   
  7. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from MeadowLily in The crazy things people say   
    My favorite is "well what CAN you eat"
     
    I say "meat, fish, chicken, fruit and vegetables" 
     
    Then they don't know what to say.   
  8. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from MeadowLily in The crazy things people say   
    My favorite is "well what CAN you eat"
     
    I say "meat, fish, chicken, fruit and vegetables" 
     
    Then they don't know what to say.   
  9. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from MeadowLily in Did you find yourself sweeter and kinder after Whole30 reintro?   
    Meadow, very interesting stuff about the Amish!!
  10. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from MeadowLily in The crazy things people say   
    My favorite is "well what CAN you eat"
     
    I say "meat, fish, chicken, fruit and vegetables" 
     
    Then they don't know what to say.   
  11. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from frantastic in What A Serving of Eggs Looks Like   
     
    I don't eat eggs at all ever as I am doing the Auto Immune Protocol. 
    I eat a regular meal for breakfast, whatever I would eat at another meal. Steak, chicken fish, fat, salad, a bunch of veggies, yum. 
    Plenty of recipes to be had on Google for Whole 30 breakfasts with no eggs. 
    Enjoy!
     
    PS I can hold a whole chicken in one hand. 
  12. Like
    Deb. reacted to MeadowLily in Did you find yourself sweeter and kinder after Whole30 reintro?   
    Leptin Resistance
     
     
    " I push the button and tell them to start exercising more with intensity and duration first using weights but never using aerobics. The reason for weight lifting first, is that it generates less ROS in the muscle at the mitochondrial level, and more importantly that it stimulates the release of growth hormone to fire up muscle activity via the neuroendocrine system. It also more quickly reestablishes the Leptin sensitivity of the furnaces that our muscles contain to burn the fat we want to get rid of. As they improve, more weight comes off and the exercise plan increases. So far this plan has not failed me because it is not based upon my opinion. It is based upon our biochemistry that is 2 million years old! Most of my neurosurgical patients get this treatment before I will operate on them because outcomes are better when the patient is metabolically fit for recovery. If you are a patient who is Leptin resistant, and work too hard too quickly with exercise as you drop weight, the risk is generating too much ROS and depleting your stem cell supply. (Levee 17) The short term effect will be weight loss and a good result, but the long term effect may be faster aging and decrease longevity!"
     
    Jack Kruse
  13. Like
    Deb. reacted to MeadowLily in Did you find yourself sweeter and kinder after Whole30 reintro?   
    Why Whole 30 Helps You 
    Become Leptin Sensitive
     
     
     
    "Become Leptin sensitive by being required to eat 50 grams of protein at breakfast everyday within 30 minutes of rising, eliminating all snacking especially past 7:30 PM, eating three meals a day, and limiting carb intake below 50 grams per day for about 6 to 8 weeks. In my practice, over the last 5 years, that is about the bell curve I have seen that most patients require to regain their Leptin signaling back. I check Leptin sensitivity by asking a few questions, or by ordering a reverse T3 level.  Small amounts of carbohydrates will not knock these processes down.  Their is a range between 50-150 grams a day based upon the season you find yourself in."
     
    Jack Kruse
    Neurosurgeon
  14. Like
    Deb. reacted to little mighty in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    BEST. THREAD. EVER.   Haven't read all the previous comments, so forgive me if any of these are repeats!
     
    ...they complain that apples are too sweet.
    ...coworkers start assuming they're vegetarian because of all the vegetables they eat. (True story! Ummmm...since when does eating vegetables make one a vegetarian? And how could you NOT see the chicken thigh nestled next to my roasted cauliflower?!)
    ...they start salivating over organ meats.
    ...they turn down even the "healthy" sweets like homemade, nut- and date-based energy balls, because that sh** is some serious SWYPO.
    ...they carry meatballs in their purse instead of chocolate.
    ...they sit there and smirk while eating their zoodles and meat sauce because only they know it's not actually pasta.
    ...they're the only one who passes up dessert at holiday meals and opts for herbal tea.
    ...they start using strange words like "cauli-rice", "zoodles", and "no-gurt".
    ...their ears perk up whenever someone mentions bacon, avocado, coconut milk, or coconut oil.
    ..."saturated fat" = fightin' words.
  15. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from little mighty in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    You tell people to bulletproof their tea because you have no milk in the house. 
  16. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from little mighty in You know someone is doing a Whole30 when...   
    You tell people to bulletproof their tea because you have no milk in the house. 
  17. Like
    Deb. reacted to frantastic in What A Serving of Eggs Looks Like   
    Deb - that cracked me up. Exactly how large a chicken can you hold in your hand?
  18. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from frantastic in What A Serving of Eggs Looks Like   
     
    I don't eat eggs at all ever as I am doing the Auto Immune Protocol. 
    I eat a regular meal for breakfast, whatever I would eat at another meal. Steak, chicken fish, fat, salad, a bunch of veggies, yum. 
    Plenty of recipes to be had on Google for Whole 30 breakfasts with no eggs. 
    Enjoy!
     
    PS I can hold a whole chicken in one hand. 
  19. Like
    Deb. got a reaction from frantastic in What A Serving of Eggs Looks Like   
     
    I don't eat eggs at all ever as I am doing the Auto Immune Protocol. 
    I eat a regular meal for breakfast, whatever I would eat at another meal. Steak, chicken fish, fat, salad, a bunch of veggies, yum. 
    Plenty of recipes to be had on Google for Whole 30 breakfasts with no eggs. 
    Enjoy!
     
    PS I can hold a whole chicken in one hand. 
  20. Like
    Deb. reacted to kirkor in Whole30 backpacking trip   
    Sun-dried tomatoes pack well, and you could do hard-boiled eggs for the first day.  Heck, or even take a frozen steak with you on day 1 and let it defrost while you hike.  
  21. Like
    Deb. reacted to MeadowLily in Did you find yourself sweeter and kinder after Whole30 reintro?   
    One of my favorites...reading their story prompted me to order "It Starts With Food"  
    EMILIE AND SHAYNA DO THE WHOLE30® (WHILE LIVING IN A CAMPER)  
    8 January, 2014Nearly a year ago, Emilie and her friend Shayna left their homes in San Diego and set out on a year-long road-trip documentary project in a 1978 Toyota Odyssey mini camper. They tried to be healthy, but any way you shake it, life on the road catches up to you. In October 2013, they put their feet down and decided they wanted to eat clean and get a fresh start.  So they started the Whole30. This is their story.
    Emilie’s StoryIn February 2013, a friend and I set out from our homes in San Diego and embarked upon a year-long road trip.  In the months before departing, we gave up our apartments, sold our stuff, and traded in our cars for a 1978 Toyota Odyssey mini-camper. Our new home was 19 feet of retro ‘70s stripes and shag ceiling carpet. The goal was 50% fun exploration of the US and 50% work research for our documentary film; we had never been more excited.
    Fast forward eight months: life on the road—from the west coast to the Rockies to Vermont to Brooklyn—had treated us well. And then… we arrived in The South.  After spending five days in Nashville doing some birthday gorging on “exotic” foods we don’t have in southern California (read: Waffle House), we knew we needed a change. When my camper-mate Shayna suggested we do a Whole30, starting right then and there, I quickly agreed (most likely because I was in the throes of a SonicBurger hangover and wasn’t thinking straight).

    First Off, We Live in a CamperThe facts were these: well, first off, we live in a camper.  Not one of those fancy mobile mansions that are bigger than your parents’ house, but a tiny one with no running water, no refrigerator, and without an oven.  We have a three burner stove top, of which two burners work.  We own one cutting knife, a frying pan, a pot, two plates, and one mug (the other one broke and we didn’t want to spend the money to replace it). Until recently we were using plastic forks, but I splurged for two real ones at a thrift store in Tennessee. To store our food, we use a red cooler a friend in Cape Cod gave to us.
    On top of that, we didn’t get a grant to do our documentary. We didn’t save up much to take on the road. We simply went. At this point in the journey we found our funds to be extremely S T R E T C H E D.  Hospitality and occasional freelance work kept us on the road, so it seemed like the most nonsensical time to stop taking free meals and embark on the pickiest eating season of our lives. But we were tired of feeling badly from putting junk in our system and we mustered up the resolve to say “NO” to stuff that shouldn’t go in our bodies.

    Friends Until the EndI had tried doing a Whole30 before, but found I wasn’t able to do it alone. Having Shayna in the same boat (camper) as me helped tremendously in terms of Whole30 success.  The first major test of our resolve was when we went to stay with a sweet southern grandma just outside of Nashville.  If there was ever an evangelist for southern home cooking, Lee was it.  From the moment we walked in to her house, she smothered us with hugs and promises that she would feed us better than anyone else.
    Though we had prepped her regarding our eating habits, I don’t think she truly believed us, or perhaps an intense paleo-style diet is just hard for an old school southern-paradigmed grandma to adjust to.  I don’t know if it was harder for us or for Lee; she seemed absolutely crestfallen that she couldn’t treat us to her cooking, which also seemed to be the way she showed love.
    We had mentioned that we could eat eggs, so the next morning when we awoke Lee was already hard at work in the kitchen. I watched in horror as she dumped almost a full cup of half & half into the eggs she was scrambling. At the breakfast table I tried to make secret motions toward Shayna regarding the “infected” scrambled eggs while I munched on a hard boiled one. We never knowingly broke our Whole30 while there, but after the Scrambled Egg Incident, we realized that there were probably lots of non-Whole30 compliant ingredients unknowingly slipped into the meals we were eating.  We decided to start over, day one again, when we left Lee’s.

    Creative Camper CookingFrom there came a lot of days where we were just on the road, not staying with anyone, and we got into a great habit of stopping mid-day wherever we happened to be (sometimes a McDonald’s parking lot, sometimes a state forest) and taking time to cook and eat a lunch. We were astounded by how creative we became with the allowed ingredients, and I must say it was kind of a thrill to be sitting on a blanket eating tilapia with Brussels sprouts and purple Asian sweet potatoes while watching people order Big Mac meals at the drive-thru window (for roughly the same price!).
    Since we were living out of a cooler, we had to stop for groceries every couple days. We’d find what was cheap and in-season and eat that different ways for a few days and then hit the store again for whatever else was cheap and in-season in whatever region we were in.  Sometimes we would just buy local meat at the farmers market and hit the grocery for the cheaper produce.
    We discovered some favorite foods among things we hadn’t really eaten before: spaghetti squash, butternut squash, and sweet potatoes. And all three really cheap. We could only really make the squashes when we stayed with someone who had an oven, but the sweet potatoes kept really well in the camper and helped satiate us on longer days. And when we discovered ghee, my whole world turned upside-down. Garlic and all sorts of different onions are cheap and can flavor a meal differently every time, and eggs are easy and keep fairly well.  Go-to meals on the run ended up being things like taco salad, “Cobb” salad, and leftovers from the night before.

    Simple PleasuresIt was refreshing to be grateful for simple things.  At my vegetarian relatives’ house we ate vegetables at their table and then cooked meat in our camper for dessert. We washed dishes whenever we could, and sometimes ended up washing them “in house” (a good paper towel wipe-down in the camper). I was always a little anxious about the price at the supermarket checkout but once we looked at the receipts and divided the cost by two, we realized we were most certainly SAVING money by choosing to eat simply and not eat out, even when we bought the $5 carton of eggs.  Doing the Whole30 with a friend made it more fun and cheaper, since we could share the cost of basic cooking ingredients like coconut oil and ghee.
    I’m not saying it was easy when we had to pass up free glasses of fine red wine at our friend’s bar in Durham, NC. But I can’t shout loudly enough about how good I felt eating clean, whole foods and how powerful it felt to say “no.”  Every time we finished a meal we marveled about our energy levels and about how satisfied we felt; I slept better too (in a camper on noisy city streets!).  In addition, I feel like I have a real jump-start on changing the way I relate to food; slowly, how I think about sugar and novelty foods is shifting.
    Thirty days was just enough time to uproot my old habits and help me lean into a new kind of lifestyle.  I wouldn’t say our situation was ideal, but all in all, my thought is this: if you’re thinking about doing the Whole30 and aren’t sure you have the resources, just imagine two plucky film-making gals traipsing around in a 1978 campervan full of sweet potatoes, and be very encouraged.

    Emilie and Shayna will be on the road until late February.  You can support them by sending them jars of ghee, hiring them ([email protected]), and following their journey on Facebook: facebook.com/holysmokesproductions;  Instagram:@holysmokesproductions; and Vimeo:vimeo.com/holysmokesproductions.
    - See more at: http://whole30.com/2014/01/camper-whole30/#sthash.EAZqwZCR.dpuf
  22. Like
    Deb. reacted to MeadowLily in Did you find yourself sweeter and kinder after Whole30 reintro?   
    "I'm a Type 1 Diabetic for 31 years. For EVERYONE, bread/starches, lactose (dairy sugars), white potatoes, corn, etc increases blood sugar. The only items that keep my glucose even-keeled are Proteins (meat), low-starch veggies (the ones approved on W30), healthy fats, and sparing low-sugar fruits (like berries, NOT like mangos or bananas).  No amount of avoiding these items temporarily will have them break down any differently when they are consumed.  If you want great #s to continue, your great habits need to continue.

     

    Personally, I "triage" things that up my glucose. Example: mashed potatoes are absolutely NOT worth it to me, so I don't eat them, EVER. A fantastic small dish of gelato while walking the streets of Italy, YES PLEASE!  & I just take a little extra insulin to compensate for the spike from sugar and milk. I never drink sweet beverages (lemonade other than made with stevia, regular soda, glasses of juice, "sport drinks," etc), as none of them are "worth it" to me. 

     

    The book It Starts With Food (a.k.a. ISWF) goes into some pretty eye-opening description of what dairy does to blood sugar! Yikes, I didn't know when I was slamming quarts of it the years before my diagnosis...."

  23. Like
    Deb. reacted to MeadowLily in Did you find yourself sweeter and kinder after Whole30 reintro?   
    Walking in green spaces can reduce your stress levels and boost your mood, say researchers.    Pilates, yoga and the classic treadmill get all the attention when it comes to popular ways to stay healthy. There is, however, a more unassuming workout that might not get the column inches, but has all the benefits: walking. Certified fitness professional Jolynn Baca Jaekel explains: “What I love about walking is that anyone can do it at any age and any fitness level. Plus it is good for your heart, your head and your wallet.”
     
    A recent report by the Ramblers and Macmillian Cancer Support entitled Walking Works  (PDF) details the health benefits of the humble walk. The report found that regular walking to fulfill the 150 minutes of moderate physical exercise every week recommended by the UK's chief medical officer could save 37,000 lives each year. It could also lead to nearly 300,000 fewer cases of type 2 diabetes.
     
    In some cases walking can be more effective than running. Scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, found that brisk walking reduces the risk of heart disease.  They observed participants aged between 18 and 80 over a six-year period and found that walking reduced the risk of heart disease by 9.3%, while running reduced it by 4.5%.
     
    And there's even more good news: 30 minutes of brisk walking over five days could help you sleep easy, according to research by Oregon State University. A study by the university showed that walking helped participants sleep better  and feel more alert during the day.
     
    Getting started
     
    The recommended amount of exercise for adults is 150 minutes of moderate physical activity per week. That breaks down to 30 minutes of exercise over five days a week.
    Even though 30 minutes is the ideal, Dr I-Min Lee, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, suggests starting with three shorter 10-minute walks each and slowly building up to the 30-minute walk  once you feel comfortable.
    The sooner you get started the sooner you’ll notice the difference in your mind and body..
     
    The mental health charity Mind found in their report Ecotherapy: The Green Agenda for Mental Health  that country walks can reduce depression and raise self-esteem. So ditch the smoggy congested route for a nearby park or green space when you head out for your 30-minute walk.
     
    Written by Carlene Thomas-Bailey
     
  24. Like
  25. Like
    Deb. reacted to [email protected] in Did you find yourself sweeter and kinder after Whole30 reintro?   
    I love you, MeadowLily. This is such good, important information.
    This, right here, is vital: "Competition is a recipe for hostility. By definition, not everyone can win a contest. If one [person] wins, another cannot. This means that each [person] comes to regard others as obstacles to his or her own success."
    I wrote a long passionate post and then tried to fool around with the formatting and lost it all. Anyway, my life changed 21 years ago when I realized that I was literally killing myself with competition. I wanted to "win" EVERYTHING... at work, with friends, with strangers, all the time. And of course I'm NOT the best at everything, I didn't always "win," and the methods I used to comfort/console myself were destructive and dangerous (food and alcohol). I found help for the alcoholism, and in the process discovered that competition was not the way I want to live. It's lonely, isolating, sad. I'm happy to report that today I can truly be happy for others' successes; I cheer on my friends' efforts at whatever they do; I can play Monopoly and not care if I win (really!); I don't race for parking spaces; I slow down if someone wants to pass me. I no longer believe in a world where there is "limited pie." That is, I no longer believe that there is a finite amount of good in the universe, and that if you get a big slice, I must get a small slice because there is just the one 9-inch pie... nope... I believe in unlimited pie. If you get a huge slice, maybe you can show me how you did it and I'll get a huge slice too; abundance, not scarcity and limitation. No more zero-sum gane. If I get more it does not mean you get less, and vice-versa. Unlimited pie.
    That isn't an original idea of mine; I heard a speaker years ago and the idea grabbed me. I will see if I can find a reference somewhere, and will post it here when/if I find it.
    I am on day 30 of a whole-at-least-60. I've seen some health improvement, mood improvement, energy increase, and weight loss/redistribution, and I think there are more changes to come before I look at reintroduction. I didn't get to this condition in 30 days (50 pounds overweight, couch potato, exhausted, type 2 diabetes, etc., etc.), and I'm not going to recover in 30 days. So... onward.