decker_bear

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  1. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from AnnaLog in Help! Akward topic...diarrhea   
    I am so glad to see this question asked. I started reading It Starts with Food a couple of days ago (can't put it down!) and I remember reading in there that diarrhea and constipation are normal like in week 2 or 3 (or something - can't remember exactly off hand). I haven't quite jumped in to the Whole 30 yet (wanted to finish the book first and I'm almost there), but I realized in reading it that I've been darn near a Whole30 for about two weeks, and I've been full paleo for over a month (no grains, legumes, etc - biggest offender was added sweetener). Literally the only things I've used in two weeks that are off-plan are cooking spray (regularly), liquid smoke (on occasion), and alcohol (two glasses of port and one beer over the past week and a half). Everything else is Whole30 compliant. That makes me think/hope the full transition won't be as scary as I've always imagined.
     
    Anyway...
     
    I've been sleeping better, had more energy, and some other positive things that come from a Whole30, but the diarrhea over the past 3 or 4 days is all but unbearable. Is it possible I'm feeling the effects of a Whole30 without strict compliance? Or could there be something else going on? I have diagnosed food allergies, and the symptoms are identical, even though I haven't consumed any of my off-limit foods. I just hope I'm not developing allergies to other foods.
     
    My fruit intake is limited (no more than two pieces per day at most), my nuts/seeds are limited (but on-plan), and my primary focus is on veggies, proteins and fats (mostly duck fat, coconut oil, olive oil and avocados). I saw above someone mentioned coconut oil had a laxative effect, maybe lay off that? I use 1-2 T. per day depending on what I'm cooking. Anyone have thoughts? Or should I revisit this once I jump into the Whole30 "for real" and get rid of my little offenders?
  2. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from jmcbn in Affording Whole30 on a Budget   
    This is really interesting to me! There are several markets in my area. The one downtown is definitely trendy and more expensive, but the local city ones aren't - there are people there to shop. $4 per dozen for fresh eggs vs $3.99 for "cage free" eggs from Sprouts. $2-3 for a basket of apples. Giant beets - 2/$1. Large spaghetti and butternut squash - $2 each. 20lb bag of red potatoes - $10. Bell peppers - 3/$1. Now, I did notice an interesting thing this last year - one of the vendors was far less expensive than some of the others and I even made a comment to him about how great his prices were. I was at his stand each week, and by the end of the summer he was literally throwing free stuff my way. At another stand I spent some time chatting with the girl working there, and when I picked up my basket of peaches, she said, "Oh, why don't you throw a few more in there." I'm NOT suggesting manipulation - but building a relationship with the vendors can go a long way, and shopping between vendors - don't just buy the first thing you see.
     
    Ladyshanny, you mentioned maybe it's because we live in farming areas? Not sure about that. I'm in Salt Lake City, Utah and most of the farmers come from the more rural areas of Utah. So, maybe??
     
    One other comment about the organic... I asked a farmer one time if his produce was organic. He explained that getting certified as organic is a lengthy, expensive process. While he didn't use chemicals or toxic pesticides, he wasn't certified and couldn't call his produce organic. It's worth asking the farmers how they raise their crops.
  3. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from jmcbn in Affording Whole30 on a Budget   
    Wow, I can totally understand your panic! Others are right - the first month is always the worst. I dread those trips when I'm out of several staples, and they always seem to run out together. #whole30problems
     
    To answer your original question, for me, my boyfriend and teenage son (and let's be honest - those two guys eat as much as four guys), we spend about $230-250 per week - that's groceries and other staples combined (toilet paper, foil, paper towels, shampoo, dish soap etc). So, our actual food bill is less than that. I shop farmers' markets whenever possible, buy my beef in bulk from a rancher, and buy as much organic as possible. I got my boyfriend on board with the grass-fed and organic idea about six months ago or so, and prior to that we were spending between $160-180 per week. That was ADDING the junk that my teenager likes - sugar cereal, Pop Tarts, etc. I feel like he's old enough to make his own choices (he's almost 18) and I'm not going to gain anything by forcing him to eat the way I believe (know) is best. I digress. But 99% of the meals I cook at home are Whole30 approved.
     
    I used to be single mom earning $8 an hour and in college, so I completely understand the budget restrictions. I have two suggestions. One, obviously, shop the sales. You may end up going to several stores to get your groceries for the week - so which is more important to you, time/convenience or money? When something goes on sale, buy it up and stick it in the freezer (or pantry as applicable). It'll cost more initially, but will even out in the long run. You may already be doing this! If there's a Sprouts in your area, they have killer deals - so plan your meals around their ads instead of the other way around. Buy frozen veggies and fish. Two, have you ever kept a spending journal? For a month, write down every penny you spend on everything. I tried this once and was MORTIIFIED. I was definitely able to identify some ways I could save money - money you could move to your food budget. I thought I was spread as thin as could be, but I was wrong. It sounds like you're really tight as it is, but even if you could free up $10 or $20 per month, that's something!
     
    Also, you mentioned Wal-Mart... are there other stores near you? I would recommend shopping around. Wal-Mart absolutely has the best prices on some things - especially prepackaged, processed food - but not necessarily on everything. Produce and meat, from my experience, tended to be more at Wal-Mart than Sprouts or Smith's (depending on the ad, of course). Since that's primarily what you're buying on a Whole30, I'm honestly not surprised at the huge jump in your grocery bill. On top of that, again - just my experience - Wal-Mart doesn't always have the freshest produce, so you may end up spending a little more AND run the risk of it spoiling quicker. Not bashing Wal-Mart, just sharing my experience.
     
    A final thought - kudos to you for taking this on with such a tight budget! I think many people would have given up. You're a rock star, my dear!
  4. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from LikeTryingTo GiveACatABath in Let's talk (non-traditional) breakfasts   
    Um - WhAt?!? I was on here looking for some breakfast ideas and saw the Elvis Burger. That is the strangest sounding thing I have EVER heard of! And really, it's good?? I just can't get my head around it. I enjoy all of the components individually, but ... can someone describe this to me?? I even checked to make sure this wasn't posted on April 1, LOL. 
  5. Like
    decker_bear reacted to jmcbn in Let's talk (non-traditional) breakfasts   
    Oh, it's good......
    Not for an every day type of thing the way you'd make a pot of chilli to last all week, but every now & then? Perfect.
     
  6. Like
    decker_bear reacted to ShannonM816 in Let's talk (non-traditional) breakfasts   
    Those seasonings would be fine. Obviously, the Elvis burger is almond butter (or sun butter, or whatever nut/seed butter you prefer) with bananas and bacon, there's also another variation -- the SB&J burger -- where you cook strawberries down to a jelly-like consistency, instead of the bananas. Both are tasty. Like jmcbn said, not an everyday thing necessarily, but a nice change of pace.
  7. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from jmcbn in Affording Whole30 on a Budget   
    This is really interesting to me! There are several markets in my area. The one downtown is definitely trendy and more expensive, but the local city ones aren't - there are people there to shop. $4 per dozen for fresh eggs vs $3.99 for "cage free" eggs from Sprouts. $2-3 for a basket of apples. Giant beets - 2/$1. Large spaghetti and butternut squash - $2 each. 20lb bag of red potatoes - $10. Bell peppers - 3/$1. Now, I did notice an interesting thing this last year - one of the vendors was far less expensive than some of the others and I even made a comment to him about how great his prices were. I was at his stand each week, and by the end of the summer he was literally throwing free stuff my way. At another stand I spent some time chatting with the girl working there, and when I picked up my basket of peaches, she said, "Oh, why don't you throw a few more in there." I'm NOT suggesting manipulation - but building a relationship with the vendors can go a long way, and shopping between vendors - don't just buy the first thing you see.
     
    Ladyshanny, you mentioned maybe it's because we live in farming areas? Not sure about that. I'm in Salt Lake City, Utah and most of the farmers come from the more rural areas of Utah. So, maybe??
     
    One other comment about the organic... I asked a farmer one time if his produce was organic. He explained that getting certified as organic is a lengthy, expensive process. While he didn't use chemicals or toxic pesticides, he wasn't certified and couldn't call his produce organic. It's worth asking the farmers how they raise their crops.
  8. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from jmcbn in Affording Whole30 on a Budget   
    This is really interesting to me! There are several markets in my area. The one downtown is definitely trendy and more expensive, but the local city ones aren't - there are people there to shop. $4 per dozen for fresh eggs vs $3.99 for "cage free" eggs from Sprouts. $2-3 for a basket of apples. Giant beets - 2/$1. Large spaghetti and butternut squash - $2 each. 20lb bag of red potatoes - $10. Bell peppers - 3/$1. Now, I did notice an interesting thing this last year - one of the vendors was far less expensive than some of the others and I even made a comment to him about how great his prices were. I was at his stand each week, and by the end of the summer he was literally throwing free stuff my way. At another stand I spent some time chatting with the girl working there, and when I picked up my basket of peaches, she said, "Oh, why don't you throw a few more in there." I'm NOT suggesting manipulation - but building a relationship with the vendors can go a long way, and shopping between vendors - don't just buy the first thing you see.
     
    Ladyshanny, you mentioned maybe it's because we live in farming areas? Not sure about that. I'm in Salt Lake City, Utah and most of the farmers come from the more rural areas of Utah. So, maybe??
     
    One other comment about the organic... I asked a farmer one time if his produce was organic. He explained that getting certified as organic is a lengthy, expensive process. While he didn't use chemicals or toxic pesticides, he wasn't certified and couldn't call his produce organic. It's worth asking the farmers how they raise their crops.
  9. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from jmcbn in Affording Whole30 on a Budget   
    This is really interesting to me! There are several markets in my area. The one downtown is definitely trendy and more expensive, but the local city ones aren't - there are people there to shop. $4 per dozen for fresh eggs vs $3.99 for "cage free" eggs from Sprouts. $2-3 for a basket of apples. Giant beets - 2/$1. Large spaghetti and butternut squash - $2 each. 20lb bag of red potatoes - $10. Bell peppers - 3/$1. Now, I did notice an interesting thing this last year - one of the vendors was far less expensive than some of the others and I even made a comment to him about how great his prices were. I was at his stand each week, and by the end of the summer he was literally throwing free stuff my way. At another stand I spent some time chatting with the girl working there, and when I picked up my basket of peaches, she said, "Oh, why don't you throw a few more in there." I'm NOT suggesting manipulation - but building a relationship with the vendors can go a long way, and shopping between vendors - don't just buy the first thing you see.
     
    Ladyshanny, you mentioned maybe it's because we live in farming areas? Not sure about that. I'm in Salt Lake City, Utah and most of the farmers come from the more rural areas of Utah. So, maybe??
     
    One other comment about the organic... I asked a farmer one time if his produce was organic. He explained that getting certified as organic is a lengthy, expensive process. While he didn't use chemicals or toxic pesticides, he wasn't certified and couldn't call his produce organic. It's worth asking the farmers how they raise their crops.
  10. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from jmcbn in Affording Whole30 on a Budget   
    Wow, I can totally understand your panic! Others are right - the first month is always the worst. I dread those trips when I'm out of several staples, and they always seem to run out together. #whole30problems
     
    To answer your original question, for me, my boyfriend and teenage son (and let's be honest - those two guys eat as much as four guys), we spend about $230-250 per week - that's groceries and other staples combined (toilet paper, foil, paper towels, shampoo, dish soap etc). So, our actual food bill is less than that. I shop farmers' markets whenever possible, buy my beef in bulk from a rancher, and buy as much organic as possible. I got my boyfriend on board with the grass-fed and organic idea about six months ago or so, and prior to that we were spending between $160-180 per week. That was ADDING the junk that my teenager likes - sugar cereal, Pop Tarts, etc. I feel like he's old enough to make his own choices (he's almost 18) and I'm not going to gain anything by forcing him to eat the way I believe (know) is best. I digress. But 99% of the meals I cook at home are Whole30 approved.
     
    I used to be single mom earning $8 an hour and in college, so I completely understand the budget restrictions. I have two suggestions. One, obviously, shop the sales. You may end up going to several stores to get your groceries for the week - so which is more important to you, time/convenience or money? When something goes on sale, buy it up and stick it in the freezer (or pantry as applicable). It'll cost more initially, but will even out in the long run. You may already be doing this! If there's a Sprouts in your area, they have killer deals - so plan your meals around their ads instead of the other way around. Buy frozen veggies and fish. Two, have you ever kept a spending journal? For a month, write down every penny you spend on everything. I tried this once and was MORTIIFIED. I was definitely able to identify some ways I could save money - money you could move to your food budget. I thought I was spread as thin as could be, but I was wrong. It sounds like you're really tight as it is, but even if you could free up $10 or $20 per month, that's something!
     
    Also, you mentioned Wal-Mart... are there other stores near you? I would recommend shopping around. Wal-Mart absolutely has the best prices on some things - especially prepackaged, processed food - but not necessarily on everything. Produce and meat, from my experience, tended to be more at Wal-Mart than Sprouts or Smith's (depending on the ad, of course). Since that's primarily what you're buying on a Whole30, I'm honestly not surprised at the huge jump in your grocery bill. On top of that, again - just my experience - Wal-Mart doesn't always have the freshest produce, so you may end up spending a little more AND run the risk of it spoiling quicker. Not bashing Wal-Mart, just sharing my experience.
     
    A final thought - kudos to you for taking this on with such a tight budget! I think many people would have given up. You're a rock star, my dear!
  11. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from jmcbn in Affording Whole30 on a Budget   
    Makes sense, though! If the farmer has to go through an expensive process for a certification, it's going to be reflected in the price of their product. Unfortunate, but a reality nonetheless. If a farmer tells me he doesn't use toxic chemicals, that's good enough for me!
  12. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from jmcbn in Affording Whole30 on a Budget   
    Makes sense, though! If the farmer has to go through an expensive process for a certification, it's going to be reflected in the price of their product. Unfortunate, but a reality nonetheless. If a farmer tells me he doesn't use toxic chemicals, that's good enough for me!
  13. Like
    decker_bear reacted to ladyshanny in Affording Whole30 on a Budget   
    I have found this too!  In fact at our little market all the proprietors that I talked to don't use chemicals or pesticides but only one is actually certified as organic...and her stuff is always more expensive.  
  14. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from jmcbn in Affording Whole30 on a Budget   
    This is really interesting to me! There are several markets in my area. The one downtown is definitely trendy and more expensive, but the local city ones aren't - there are people there to shop. $4 per dozen for fresh eggs vs $3.99 for "cage free" eggs from Sprouts. $2-3 for a basket of apples. Giant beets - 2/$1. Large spaghetti and butternut squash - $2 each. 20lb bag of red potatoes - $10. Bell peppers - 3/$1. Now, I did notice an interesting thing this last year - one of the vendors was far less expensive than some of the others and I even made a comment to him about how great his prices were. I was at his stand each week, and by the end of the summer he was literally throwing free stuff my way. At another stand I spent some time chatting with the girl working there, and when I picked up my basket of peaches, she said, "Oh, why don't you throw a few more in there." I'm NOT suggesting manipulation - but building a relationship with the vendors can go a long way, and shopping between vendors - don't just buy the first thing you see.
     
    Ladyshanny, you mentioned maybe it's because we live in farming areas? Not sure about that. I'm in Salt Lake City, Utah and most of the farmers come from the more rural areas of Utah. So, maybe??
     
    One other comment about the organic... I asked a farmer one time if his produce was organic. He explained that getting certified as organic is a lengthy, expensive process. While he didn't use chemicals or toxic pesticides, he wasn't certified and couldn't call his produce organic. It's worth asking the farmers how they raise their crops.
  15. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from jmcbn in Affording Whole30 on a Budget   
    Wow, I can totally understand your panic! Others are right - the first month is always the worst. I dread those trips when I'm out of several staples, and they always seem to run out together. #whole30problems
     
    To answer your original question, for me, my boyfriend and teenage son (and let's be honest - those two guys eat as much as four guys), we spend about $230-250 per week - that's groceries and other staples combined (toilet paper, foil, paper towels, shampoo, dish soap etc). So, our actual food bill is less than that. I shop farmers' markets whenever possible, buy my beef in bulk from a rancher, and buy as much organic as possible. I got my boyfriend on board with the grass-fed and organic idea about six months ago or so, and prior to that we were spending between $160-180 per week. That was ADDING the junk that my teenager likes - sugar cereal, Pop Tarts, etc. I feel like he's old enough to make his own choices (he's almost 18) and I'm not going to gain anything by forcing him to eat the way I believe (know) is best. I digress. But 99% of the meals I cook at home are Whole30 approved.
     
    I used to be single mom earning $8 an hour and in college, so I completely understand the budget restrictions. I have two suggestions. One, obviously, shop the sales. You may end up going to several stores to get your groceries for the week - so which is more important to you, time/convenience or money? When something goes on sale, buy it up and stick it in the freezer (or pantry as applicable). It'll cost more initially, but will even out in the long run. You may already be doing this! If there's a Sprouts in your area, they have killer deals - so plan your meals around their ads instead of the other way around. Buy frozen veggies and fish. Two, have you ever kept a spending journal? For a month, write down every penny you spend on everything. I tried this once and was MORTIIFIED. I was definitely able to identify some ways I could save money - money you could move to your food budget. I thought I was spread as thin as could be, but I was wrong. It sounds like you're really tight as it is, but even if you could free up $10 or $20 per month, that's something!
     
    Also, you mentioned Wal-Mart... are there other stores near you? I would recommend shopping around. Wal-Mart absolutely has the best prices on some things - especially prepackaged, processed food - but not necessarily on everything. Produce and meat, from my experience, tended to be more at Wal-Mart than Sprouts or Smith's (depending on the ad, of course). Since that's primarily what you're buying on a Whole30, I'm honestly not surprised at the huge jump in your grocery bill. On top of that, again - just my experience - Wal-Mart doesn't always have the freshest produce, so you may end up spending a little more AND run the risk of it spoiling quicker. Not bashing Wal-Mart, just sharing my experience.
     
    A final thought - kudos to you for taking this on with such a tight budget! I think many people would have given up. You're a rock star, my dear!
  16. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from jmcbn in Affording Whole30 on a Budget   
    This is really interesting to me! There are several markets in my area. The one downtown is definitely trendy and more expensive, but the local city ones aren't - there are people there to shop. $4 per dozen for fresh eggs vs $3.99 for "cage free" eggs from Sprouts. $2-3 for a basket of apples. Giant beets - 2/$1. Large spaghetti and butternut squash - $2 each. 20lb bag of red potatoes - $10. Bell peppers - 3/$1. Now, I did notice an interesting thing this last year - one of the vendors was far less expensive than some of the others and I even made a comment to him about how great his prices were. I was at his stand each week, and by the end of the summer he was literally throwing free stuff my way. At another stand I spent some time chatting with the girl working there, and when I picked up my basket of peaches, she said, "Oh, why don't you throw a few more in there." I'm NOT suggesting manipulation - but building a relationship with the vendors can go a long way, and shopping between vendors - don't just buy the first thing you see.
     
    Ladyshanny, you mentioned maybe it's because we live in farming areas? Not sure about that. I'm in Salt Lake City, Utah and most of the farmers come from the more rural areas of Utah. So, maybe??
     
    One other comment about the organic... I asked a farmer one time if his produce was organic. He explained that getting certified as organic is a lengthy, expensive process. While he didn't use chemicals or toxic pesticides, he wasn't certified and couldn't call his produce organic. It's worth asking the farmers how they raise their crops.
  17. Like
    decker_bear reacted to ladyshanny in What A Serving of Eggs Looks Like   
    Haha, I sort of do this too, "rough cooking". I buy the pre sliced mushrooms from Costco but they are enormous so I throw in the pan and just split them with my spatula. It doesn't all have to be pretty.
  18. Like
    decker_bear reacted to Deb. in What A Serving of Eggs Looks Like   
     
    I don't eat eggs at all ever as I am doing the Auto Immune Protocol. 
    I eat a regular meal for breakfast, whatever I would eat at another meal. Steak, chicken fish, fat, salad, a bunch of veggies, yum. 
    Plenty of recipes to be had on Google for Whole 30 breakfasts with no eggs. 
    Enjoy!
     
    PS I can hold a whole chicken in one hand. 
  19. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from Physibeth in What A Serving of Eggs Looks Like   
    I love eggs and eat them almost every single morning. The other day I ran out - gasp! - and only had two so I had to supplement. I used my normal sauteed veggies, the two eggs, and tossed some turkey on top. It was actually incredibly tasty. The only one I can't get behind (yet) is fish at breakfast time.
     
    There's so much you can do with eggs. Have you tried switching it up? Poaching, over easy (or medium or hard), scrambled, hard boiled, steamed, omelet, frittata, bake them in a pepper... When I get tired of one method I'll switch to another, swap out my veggies and seasonings, and it's like a completely different meal.
  20. Like
    decker_bear reacted to kirkor in What A Serving of Eggs Looks Like   
    Am I doing this right?
     

  21. Like
    decker_bear reacted to Physibeth in What A Serving of Eggs Looks Like   
     

     
    Well you are allowed to have 2 servings of protein if you need it. This would be a question for the top dogs in all seriousness. I'd be scared I'd drop one of my very expensive pastured eggs trying to build a pyramid. And my floors are not really clean right now...and I would scoop it up and eat it anyway. 
  22. Like
    decker_bear got a reaction from AnnaLog in Help! Akward topic...diarrhea   
    I am so glad to see this question asked. I started reading It Starts with Food a couple of days ago (can't put it down!) and I remember reading in there that diarrhea and constipation are normal like in week 2 or 3 (or something - can't remember exactly off hand). I haven't quite jumped in to the Whole 30 yet (wanted to finish the book first and I'm almost there), but I realized in reading it that I've been darn near a Whole30 for about two weeks, and I've been full paleo for over a month (no grains, legumes, etc - biggest offender was added sweetener). Literally the only things I've used in two weeks that are off-plan are cooking spray (regularly), liquid smoke (on occasion), and alcohol (two glasses of port and one beer over the past week and a half). Everything else is Whole30 compliant. That makes me think/hope the full transition won't be as scary as I've always imagined.
     
    Anyway...
     
    I've been sleeping better, had more energy, and some other positive things that come from a Whole30, but the diarrhea over the past 3 or 4 days is all but unbearable. Is it possible I'm feeling the effects of a Whole30 without strict compliance? Or could there be something else going on? I have diagnosed food allergies, and the symptoms are identical, even though I haven't consumed any of my off-limit foods. I just hope I'm not developing allergies to other foods.
     
    My fruit intake is limited (no more than two pieces per day at most), my nuts/seeds are limited (but on-plan), and my primary focus is on veggies, proteins and fats (mostly duck fat, coconut oil, olive oil and avocados). I saw above someone mentioned coconut oil had a laxative effect, maybe lay off that? I use 1-2 T. per day depending on what I'm cooking. Anyone have thoughts? Or should I revisit this once I jump into the Whole30 "for real" and get rid of my little offenders?