AR3825

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  1. Like
    AR3825 got a reaction from victor_dan in Don't over think this.   
    This is the whole truth. My fiancé might get Cheetos and a Dr. Pepper to make it through if anything at all. 8-12 hours with nothing to eat? I couldn’t do it. That’s why the people who do in order to keep the rest of us alive are truly a blessing. We are trying to think of Whole 30 compliant emergency foods that she can grab instead. I think trying those beef “granola bar” looking things off the approved company list might be a good idea before we start. It is still strange to me having a meat “granola bar” shaped emergency beef pack. I hope someone knows what I’m talking about. 
  2. Like
    AR3825 reacted to Visolela in UK "E Numbers" to avoid   
    For those who were wondering these aren't just for the UK. They apply to most of Europe and other parts of the world as well.
     
    For example, these numbers are also used (sometimes) in Brazil. They are used on products that are made here - not just imports,  however - I would recommend having these numbers on your cellphone to consult if necessary, especially if you are shopping in stores with imports even if you are in the US.
     
    For those wondering about different E numbers not on Melissa`s list and whether they can/can't wikipedia has a complete list you can  use as reference:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E_number
     
  3. Like
    AR3825 reacted to wheresanita in Don't over think this.   
    Hey Amy,
    Unfortunately hospitals are not bastions of healthy eating! I did a clinical rotation at a facility that had a McDonalds! In our busy unit we often do not get a full sit-down lunch break. Many people resort to the 'running to the break room and scoffing a pack of graham crackers an some peanut butter' a few times a day in lieu of a real meal. Hence my victory with my eggy/muffiny things
  4. Like
    AR3825 reacted to wheresanita in Don't over think this.   
    Thank you for this! I worked a rogue night shift this week (between day 2 and day 3 of my W30) and was having some guilt twinges regarding my every 2 hour egg/meat/coconut milk/veggie 'muffin' - but it allowed me to get through the night without having graham crackers and peanut butter (an ICU staff nutritional staple!). It's not what I do on a normal day, but I survived my shift with my W30 intact so it was a victory. I think we are very hard on ourselves sometimes. I was actually feeling GUILTY about the 'egg muffings' because I felt I was 'snacking'. Then I remembered that we hear a lot about context here. And in that moment (or those 12 hours) I was doing what I had to do to maintain my W30. And I felt better. Yay me!!
  5. Like
    AR3825 reacted to Robin Strathdee in Don't over think this.   
    Welcome all newcomers, welcome back vets, and for those of you who never left...welcome to this post.
    I just wanted to pop in here and remind you all to take a deep breath before you dive into all the questions about what you can and can't have. The program guidelines are clear on what you can and can't have (grains, dairy, W30 muffins), but things get a little grey when people start talking about what you should and shouldn't have. Please don't over think think this. You don't have to address every food related issue you have, break every bad habit, and shun every food that gives you comfort to succeed with your Whole30. If you need to you can always extend or repeat the process, and things will get better each time you do. My advice to you is this:

    Stick to the rules like they are your port in a storm (really, they will become that).
    Take the Moderators responses seriously (we know what we're talking about).
    Take community members suggestions as advice from those who came before, but keep in mind they are not the rules and not the Mods. Everyone here is well-meaning, and everyone here wants to see you succeed, but everyone here is at a different place in this journey.
    And finally, take comfort in these words (from Melissa Hartwig, on another forum post):

    Here's the thing (and this is an interesting discussion)... there are Whole30 "rules," which are strict, clearly outlined, and very well defined. No grains - and here are all the things we consider grains. No dairy - and here are all the dairy items excluded. No Paleo-fied food choices, and here's what those look like.
    Then, there are Whole30 suggestions for success. They're not part of the official rules, but they're things that we've seen really help (or harm) people as they move through the program. Fruit smoothies for breakfast - not a good idea. Skipping breakfast - not a good idea. Eating every two hours, all day - not a good idea. These things won't necessarily affect your Whole30 results (although they might), but if we can give you additional suggestions that will make your transition and your program easier and more effective, we're going to give them to you.
    Keep Calm and Whole30 On.
  6. Like
    AR3825 reacted to SugarcubeOD in NEW!! Coconut Aminos and Chips   
    NEW WHOLE30 RULES: CHIPS AND COCONUT AMINOS
    27 March, 2017
    From Whole30 headmistress Melissa Hartwig, who works really hard to make the program both effective and easy to follow
    It’s been a long time since I’ve issued any changes to the Whole30 rules; the last was in 2014, when we brought back the white potato. Making a rule change is a really big deal; it’s a huge communication effort to share the new information with millions of people worldwide and update all of our books and resources. But food manufacturers continue to create grain-free, dairy-free products that didn’t exist when I wrote the original Whole30 rules, and frankly, they’re making my job really hard here.
    After much research, discussion with my forum moderators, and consulting the Whole30 team, we concur it’s time to revise a few points, based on the current marketplace. Here are two new Whole30 rules, effective April 1, 2017 (or right now, since you’re reading it). If you want, just read the rules and apply, easy-peasy. If you want to hear the thought process behind the changes, however, I’ll describe in detail below.
    New Whole30 Rules
    No store-bought chips of any origin (potato, tortilla, plantain, coconut, kale…) Coconut aminos are an exception to the “no added sugar” rule (and continue to be permissible on the program)   No more plantain chips on the #Whole30? Spread the word; two NEW Whole30 rules. CLICK TO TWEET
      No Store-Bought Chips
    When we brought white potatoes back in 2014, one sticky issue was, “How do we keep people from eating French fries and potato chips, as those are obviously not in the spirit of the Whole30?” The answer was easy; saying, “No potato chips, and no restaurant or fast-food fries.” Back in 2014, all you could find in the store were potato chips or “Sweets n Beets.”  Kale or broccoli “chips” didn’t exist, tortilla chips were made only with corn, and plantain chips were just showing up on the scene, but not popular enough to be on our radar.
    Over the last few years, the variety of “healthy” chips in stores have exploded. You can now buy “nacho” flavored kale chips, cassava flour tortilla chips, and “roasted” plantain chips containing technically compliant Whole30 ingredients. This has caused great confusion in the community—kale chips must be okay because they’re kale, but what about plantain chips, or those potato chips fried in unrefined coconut oil? It was hard to keep up with; a fact I saw reflected in the #whole30 photos you’re posting on Instagram. In thinking about how to communicate my thoughts on the place of chips on the Whole30, I kept coming back to the central theme: Face-planting into a packaged bag of chips (of any nature) has no place in resetting your health, habits, and relationship with food.
    Especially plantain chips. You know you crack out on them, and news flash: THEY’RE NOT ACTUALLY HEALTHY.
    So, allow us to make it easy for you, and return to our Whole30 “real, whole, nutrient-dense” food roots: No store-bought chips. Period. Not even if they’re kale.  Not even if they’re roasted. Not even if they’re cooked in coconut oil. Chips of any nature are counter to the Whole30 mission, they’re pushing more nutrient-dense food off your plate, and they’re all too easy to turn into food with no brakes.
    It’s only 30 days, and you can do better.
    Feel free to make your own real-food version at home; bake kale leaves, pan-fry plantain slices, or roast potato wedges. But please, no deep-frying. That should go without saying.
    Coconut Aminos
    Coconut aminos (a soy sauce substitute made from coconut) came on the Whole30 scene around 2013. The first company to release the product was Coconut Secret, and the ingredients read, “Organic coconut ‘sap’ aged and blended with sun-dried, mineral-rich sea salt.” Based on this ingredient list*, it appeared totally Whole30 compliant. We began using aminos in our recipes and cookbooks, creating Asian-inspired dishes with exciting flavors.
    Today, we have a variety of aminos; Big Tree Farms is a major market player, and Thrive Market has their own brand of aminos. Trouble is, their ingredients read slightly different: “Organic fair trade coconut blossom nectar, sea salt.” And it’s that one word, “nectar,” that’s causing trouble, because in Whole30 lingo, “nectar” = “sugar.”
    I got on the phone with Elizabeth from Big Tree Farms, so she could explain the way aminos are made. The nectar itself is harvested from the coconut flower blossoms (not the tree itself, as the word “sap” might indicate). From there, you can do a few things with the nectar: brew it down with sea salt and water (natural fermentation may be part of this process) and turn it into aminos; dry it and allow it to granulate, turning it into coconut sugar; or sell it as coconut syrup, a liquid sweetener substitute.
    So technically, all aminos are derived from a sugar source—but not all labels are clear about that. Which means that according to the current rules, some brands of aminos are out, while some are allowed, based solely on the way the companies chose to write the ingredients on the label.
    Furthermore, unlike the other two forms of coconut nectar, aminos are not a sugar substitute.  Would you add it to your coffee or tea, or pour it over berries? (EW.)
    To avoid further confusion, we’re just going to write a new exclusion into the rules: “coconut aminos” are compliant for the program, even if the word “nectar” is on the label.
    *When you read the rest of the Coconut Secret label, the word “sap” is in quotation marks, and the bottle description does say it comes from “sap that exudes from the coconut blossom.” Consumers (myself included) assumed the product came from the tree (or the coconut itself), but it is sourced from the coconut blossom, just like the other brands. 
    Next Steps
    First, these new rules officially go into effect on April 1, 2017. If you’ve been eating ingredient-compliant plantain chips or store-bought kale chips, you don’t have to start over; just stop eating them. (And if you’ve been using aminos of any brand, nothing actually changes.)
    Second, we’d appreciate you helping us share the rules by reposting our Instagram post, sharing our Facebook post, or Tweeting about it (below).
      Have you heard? TWO new #Whole30 rules re: chips and coconut aminos! Details here. CLICK TO TWEET
      Third, we’ve already updated the Can I Have blog post, the Whole30 Program Rules, and the accompanying PDF. We’re also in the process of cleaning up old forum entries with out-of-date info. However, patience, please, as that process could take a while. I’m also working the revisions into immediate reprints of The Whole30 and The Whole30 Cookbook.
    Finally, we’ll be working with our partners at Thrive Market and Barefoot Provisions to remove kale chips from their Whole30 kits. This could take a little while, logistically.
    On behalf of the Whole30 team, thank you for your continued support and your tolerance for these occasional changes. We are always evaluating the rules for their logic, foundation in science, effectiveness, and ease of use. Balancing all of those isn’t always easy, but we think these changes encompass the spirit and intention of the program, while making it even easier for you to follow the rules.
    Even if you’re mad about the plantain chips.