Tom Denham

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  1. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from kb0426 in Confused about eating meal one after workout   
    Your pre-workout routine sounds okay. The big question is what you eat after working out. The purpose of the post-workout meal is to help you recover as quickly as possible. Your body is especially ready to eat after a hard workout and what it wants is protein. This meal needs to be eaten within 15-30 minutes of the workout ending because the muscles are especially open to food at that time. This meal needs to include lean protein. Lean because fat slows digestion and you need this protein to get to your muscles quickly. Protein because that is what the muscles want. Starchy carbs are an optional part of post-workout meals. If you need to revive your energy stores, eating a starchy carb like sweet potato helps. If weight loss is more important to you than energy, you can skip the carbs in the post workout meal.
    If you complete a workout and then drive home and prepare a meal so that you are eating 45-60 minutes after your workout, your muscles have closed their "special window of openness" by the time you eat. Similarly, if you eat a meal within 15-30 minutes that includes a lot of fat as comes with whole eggs or avocados, your digestion is slowed and your muscles are not fed in a timely fashion. Your recovery suffers when this happens.
    I personally thought the idea of a post-workout meal was silly when I first heard Dallas and Melissa say we should eat them. I ignored the recommendation for at least a year until I was at a nutrition seminar and they explained why it was important in a way that made sense to me. I started eating a post-workout meal and noticed that I experienced less muscle soreness over the course of a week of workouts. Eating lean protein immediately after a workout really made a noticeable difference for me.
    I don't bother with a post-workout meal after a yoga class or a slow 5 mile run, but if I hit the gym to do a kettlebell or barbell routine, I eat a can of tuna packed in water as soon as I finish. I used to eat sardines, but the owner of the gym told me I could not eat sardines inside the building.
    I often drive home from the gym after eating a can of tuna, prepare a meal, and then eat again within about an hour. Adding more food with fat after a post-workout meal is okay as long as the lean protein has a good head start on the next meal.
  2. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from Littlepeanut in Confused about eating meal one after workout   
    The ideal post workout food is probably chicken breast and baked sweet potato. I prefer the convenience of canned fish, so I use sardines or tuna packed in water. Sardines and tuna are not as lean as chicken breast, but still lean enough to digest fast, at least the ones packed in water. I prefer the taste of fish packed in oil, but I take stuff packed in water for my post-workout meals.
     
    The recommendation for a pre-workout meal is protein and fat. Probably the ideal pre-workout food is a boiled egg or two. I skip the pre-workout meal a lot, but one boiled egg or a small handful of nuts are what I eat.
  3. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from Littlepeanut in Confused about eating meal one after workout   
    The ideal post workout food is probably chicken breast and baked sweet potato. I prefer the convenience of canned fish, so I use sardines or tuna packed in water. Sardines and tuna are not as lean as chicken breast, but still lean enough to digest fast, at least the ones packed in water. I prefer the taste of fish packed in oil, but I take stuff packed in water for my post-workout meals.
     
    The recommendation for a pre-workout meal is protein and fat. Probably the ideal pre-workout food is a boiled egg or two. I skip the pre-workout meal a lot, but one boiled egg or a small handful of nuts are what I eat.
  4. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from kb0426 in Confused about eating meal one after workout   
    Your pre-workout routine sounds okay. The big question is what you eat after working out. The purpose of the post-workout meal is to help you recover as quickly as possible. Your body is especially ready to eat after a hard workout and what it wants is protein. This meal needs to be eaten within 15-30 minutes of the workout ending because the muscles are especially open to food at that time. This meal needs to include lean protein. Lean because fat slows digestion and you need this protein to get to your muscles quickly. Protein because that is what the muscles want. Starchy carbs are an optional part of post-workout meals. If you need to revive your energy stores, eating a starchy carb like sweet potato helps. If weight loss is more important to you than energy, you can skip the carbs in the post workout meal.
    If you complete a workout and then drive home and prepare a meal so that you are eating 45-60 minutes after your workout, your muscles have closed their "special window of openness" by the time you eat. Similarly, if you eat a meal within 15-30 minutes that includes a lot of fat as comes with whole eggs or avocados, your digestion is slowed and your muscles are not fed in a timely fashion. Your recovery suffers when this happens.
    I personally thought the idea of a post-workout meal was silly when I first heard Dallas and Melissa say we should eat them. I ignored the recommendation for at least a year until I was at a nutrition seminar and they explained why it was important in a way that made sense to me. I started eating a post-workout meal and noticed that I experienced less muscle soreness over the course of a week of workouts. Eating lean protein immediately after a workout really made a noticeable difference for me.
    I don't bother with a post-workout meal after a yoga class or a slow 5 mile run, but if I hit the gym to do a kettlebell or barbell routine, I eat a can of tuna packed in water as soon as I finish. I used to eat sardines, but the owner of the gym told me I could not eat sardines inside the building.
    I often drive home from the gym after eating a can of tuna, prepare a meal, and then eat again within about an hour. Adding more food with fat after a post-workout meal is okay as long as the lean protein has a good head start on the next meal.
  5. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from kb0426 in Confused about eating meal one after workout   
    Your pre-workout routine sounds okay. The big question is what you eat after working out. The purpose of the post-workout meal is to help you recover as quickly as possible. Your body is especially ready to eat after a hard workout and what it wants is protein. This meal needs to be eaten within 15-30 minutes of the workout ending because the muscles are especially open to food at that time. This meal needs to include lean protein. Lean because fat slows digestion and you need this protein to get to your muscles quickly. Protein because that is what the muscles want. Starchy carbs are an optional part of post-workout meals. If you need to revive your energy stores, eating a starchy carb like sweet potato helps. If weight loss is more important to you than energy, you can skip the carbs in the post workout meal.
    If you complete a workout and then drive home and prepare a meal so that you are eating 45-60 minutes after your workout, your muscles have closed their "special window of openness" by the time you eat. Similarly, if you eat a meal within 15-30 minutes that includes a lot of fat as comes with whole eggs or avocados, your digestion is slowed and your muscles are not fed in a timely fashion. Your recovery suffers when this happens.
    I personally thought the idea of a post-workout meal was silly when I first heard Dallas and Melissa say we should eat them. I ignored the recommendation for at least a year until I was at a nutrition seminar and they explained why it was important in a way that made sense to me. I started eating a post-workout meal and noticed that I experienced less muscle soreness over the course of a week of workouts. Eating lean protein immediately after a workout really made a noticeable difference for me.
    I don't bother with a post-workout meal after a yoga class or a slow 5 mile run, but if I hit the gym to do a kettlebell or barbell routine, I eat a can of tuna packed in water as soon as I finish. I used to eat sardines, but the owner of the gym told me I could not eat sardines inside the building.
    I often drive home from the gym after eating a can of tuna, prepare a meal, and then eat again within about an hour. Adding more food with fat after a post-workout meal is okay as long as the lean protein has a good head start on the next meal.
  6. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from kb0426 in Confused about eating meal one after workout   
    Your pre-workout routine sounds okay. The big question is what you eat after working out. The purpose of the post-workout meal is to help you recover as quickly as possible. Your body is especially ready to eat after a hard workout and what it wants is protein. This meal needs to be eaten within 15-30 minutes of the workout ending because the muscles are especially open to food at that time. This meal needs to include lean protein. Lean because fat slows digestion and you need this protein to get to your muscles quickly. Protein because that is what the muscles want. Starchy carbs are an optional part of post-workout meals. If you need to revive your energy stores, eating a starchy carb like sweet potato helps. If weight loss is more important to you than energy, you can skip the carbs in the post workout meal.
    If you complete a workout and then drive home and prepare a meal so that you are eating 45-60 minutes after your workout, your muscles have closed their "special window of openness" by the time you eat. Similarly, if you eat a meal within 15-30 minutes that includes a lot of fat as comes with whole eggs or avocados, your digestion is slowed and your muscles are not fed in a timely fashion. Your recovery suffers when this happens.
    I personally thought the idea of a post-workout meal was silly when I first heard Dallas and Melissa say we should eat them. I ignored the recommendation for at least a year until I was at a nutrition seminar and they explained why it was important in a way that made sense to me. I started eating a post-workout meal and noticed that I experienced less muscle soreness over the course of a week of workouts. Eating lean protein immediately after a workout really made a noticeable difference for me.
    I don't bother with a post-workout meal after a yoga class or a slow 5 mile run, but if I hit the gym to do a kettlebell or barbell routine, I eat a can of tuna packed in water as soon as I finish. I used to eat sardines, but the owner of the gym told me I could not eat sardines inside the building.
    I often drive home from the gym after eating a can of tuna, prepare a meal, and then eat again within about an hour. Adding more food with fat after a post-workout meal is okay as long as the lean protein has a good head start on the next meal.
  7. Like
    Tom Denham reacted to percypat in Kombucha Makers Unite; Where to ask and be answered   
    Awesome idea! Plus one for the n00bs right here ... Three weeks ago I didn't know what kombucha was, and now I (hopefully) have a pet SCOBY growing in my kitchen. Either that or I am farming mould.
    Apparently getting into this makes you crazy so it'll be nice to have a place for us loonies to hang out together
  8. Like
    Tom Denham reacted to kb0426 in Kombucha Makers Unite; Where to ask and be answered   
    Hi!
    Susan had a wonderful idea of having one place where it is all things related to making/brewing Kombucha could be asked and answered. There are several of us that are newbies at this (me) and some real pros out there (Susan, Miss Mary, Nadia...) and thought that one place to keep all things related to making your own kombucha would be helpful for others embarking on this journey.
    I have begun the process of making my own SCOBY (symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast) and if this is an epic failure, will end up getting SCOBY locally. I have heard Craig's List is a great source for people giving away free SCOBY to a good home! My potential source is one from Miss Mary!
    I am reading up on the process to actually make the kombucha. Just like when I made my own sauerkraut for the first time, I am a little intimidated! This isn't something my mother taught me how to do growing up!
    We will all learn together!
  9. Like
    Tom Denham reacted to mkn in Claussen Kosher Dill Pickles   
    @Tom, just bought a jar of the Bubbies. Delicious, but also has calcium chloride as an ingredient.
  10. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from Krista Porter Agocs in Claussen Kosher Dill Pickles   
    You can eat the Clausen's but there are better choices available. Bubbies Kosher Dills are made with

    Cucumbers
    Artesian Well Water
    Garlic
    Salt
    Dill
    Spices

  11. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from Krista Porter Agocs in Claussen Kosher Dill Pickles   
    You can eat the Clausen's but there are better choices available. Bubbies Kosher Dills are made with

    Cucumbers
    Artesian Well Water
    Garlic
    Salt
    Dill
    Spices

  12. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from Krista Porter Agocs in Claussen Kosher Dill Pickles   
    You can eat the Clausen's but there are better choices available. Bubbies Kosher Dills are made with

    Cucumbers
    Artesian Well Water
    Garlic
    Salt
    Dill
    Spices

  13. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from Callan in Weight Loss?   
    Thank you for asking!
    Most people lose weight during a Whole30. Eating only healthy foods tends to make that happen. However, the Whole30 is not a weight loss program, it is a health improvement program. It really works best if you focus on trying to improve your health and let the weight take care of itself. Therefore, it takes some trust on your part that this program is good for you and will yield good results. Unfortunately, if you focus on weight loss, you can mess up your Whole30 and either slow weight loss or hurt your health.
    The key to this program is eating as much as is recommended in the meal template. If you try to speed weight loss by eating less food or less fat, it interferes with your hormones achieving a normal, healthy balance and often backfires. Here is a link to the meal template... http://whole9life.com/book/ISWF-Meal-Planning-Template.pdf
    Do not count points, track calories, or weigh your food. The replacement for that behavior is following the meal template and paying attention to your feelings. If you try to do both, you will fail at following the meal template and paying attention to your feelings. They may not seem your best choice now, but they really are what works for a lifetime of health and happiness.
    I lost weight with this program starting in May of 2010. I lost 2 pounds per month for 15 months in a row. I ate lots of food and was never hungry. I made the mistake of trying to speed the process by skipping some meals. Back in 2010, stepping on a scale was not forbidden. What I discovered is that I sometimes gained weight on days I skipped meals. I don't understand why. I also tried to speed weight loss by exercising more than usual. I would add a 5K run to my ordinary workout. That did not make me lose weight faster either. Finally after a few months, I settled down and just followed the program. I kept losing weight until I was down 30 pounds. I went from 215 to 185. 185 was my goal weight. I wondered if I would keep losing weight when I reached it. Curiously enough, I got down to 184 one day, but never lost more. I kept eating exactly the same, but stopped losing weight.
    Today, I weigh 195, but I am much more muscular than I was before. I have not had my body fat measured, but I suspect I remain as lean as ever, but when I started lifting heavy weights, my chest, arms, and legs got bigger. This program really works if you will let it. Just give it time.
  14. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from TracyP in Where is the guidance on reintroducing Alcohol?   
    You can plug alcohol in to the schedule similar to any other food with the exception that you probably don't want to have a shot of whiskey at breakfast, a glass of scotch at lunch, and a glass of wine with dinner unless your lifestyle is friendly to drinking all day. Actually, a few servings of your favorite drink should give you an idea of how your body responds.
    I was impressed with how much more detailed the reintroduction advice was in It Starts With Food than anything Dallas and Melissa had written before. Now I hear you guys asking for more details. Some of that is developing though our discussions here on the forum. I am kind of saying you may need to reintroduce for several days in order to have enough servings of a food to get a reaction if you are going to have one. And then I think you need several days of clean eating before testing a new food to let your body get back to baseline. If you crowd tests too closely together, you won't get as good an idea of how strongly something is affecting you.
  15. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from TracyP in Where is the guidance on reintroducing Alcohol?   
    You can plug alcohol in to the schedule similar to any other food with the exception that you probably don't want to have a shot of whiskey at breakfast, a glass of scotch at lunch, and a glass of wine with dinner unless your lifestyle is friendly to drinking all day. Actually, a few servings of your favorite drink should give you an idea of how your body responds.
    I was impressed with how much more detailed the reintroduction advice was in It Starts With Food than anything Dallas and Melissa had written before. Now I hear you guys asking for more details. Some of that is developing though our discussions here on the forum. I am kind of saying you may need to reintroduce for several days in order to have enough servings of a food to get a reaction if you are going to have one. And then I think you need several days of clean eating before testing a new food to let your body get back to baseline. If you crowd tests too closely together, you won't get as good an idea of how strongly something is affecting you.
  16. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from TracyP in Where is the guidance on reintroducing Alcohol?   
    You can plug alcohol in to the schedule similar to any other food with the exception that you probably don't want to have a shot of whiskey at breakfast, a glass of scotch at lunch, and a glass of wine with dinner unless your lifestyle is friendly to drinking all day. Actually, a few servings of your favorite drink should give you an idea of how your body responds.
    I was impressed with how much more detailed the reintroduction advice was in It Starts With Food than anything Dallas and Melissa had written before. Now I hear you guys asking for more details. Some of that is developing though our discussions here on the forum. I am kind of saying you may need to reintroduce for several days in order to have enough servings of a food to get a reaction if you are going to have one. And then I think you need several days of clean eating before testing a new food to let your body get back to baseline. If you crowd tests too closely together, you won't get as good an idea of how strongly something is affecting you.
  17. Like
    Tom Denham reacted to Terez in Where is the guidance on reintroducing Alcohol?   
    I don't have any input on the alcohol question but I do have a suggestion on the reintroduction schedule.
    It turns out that we should be prepared to allow 2 days for each reintroduction and then three days of clean eating to see if we react to it. (If we react the first day then no need to add the second day. But if we don't react the first day, we might not have enough of the food in our system yet and we should eat it a second day.)
    So your schedule above (if allowing 2 days per food test) would be:
    Days 1 & 2: dairy.
    Days 6 & 7: gluten grains.
    Days 11-12: non-gluten grains.
    Days 16-17: legumes.
    I'm whining that they should call this a Whole60 and not a Whole30 because we're really not off it until after we've tested all the foods that we're going to test.
    I look forward to hearing the replies to your alcohol question.
  18. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from Robin Strathdee in Compliant Chicken Broth   
    There are very few sugar free chicken broths on the market. One I found at Whole Foods was the Imagine brand, but only the Organic Free Range Chicken. Other varieties included cane sugar. I found one other sugar free brand once upon a time, but I've forgotten the name.
  19. Like
    Tom Denham got a reaction from Robin Strathdee in Compliant Chicken Broth   
    There are very few sugar free chicken broths on the market. One I found at Whole Foods was the Imagine brand, but only the Organic Free Range Chicken. Other varieties included cane sugar. I found one other sugar free brand once upon a time, but I've forgotten the name.
  20. Like
    Tom Denham reacted to Kirsteen in Don't over think this.   
    Robin, I'm going to print this out and keep it. You don't have to address every food related issue you have, break every bad habit, and shun every food that gives you comfort to succeed with your Whole30. I love it, love it, love it. thankyou
  21. Like
    Tom Denham reacted to Susan W in Don't over think this.   
    Great post Robin. I take "the rules" very seriously and feel by following them fully, I get the most that I can from the program. I will start prefacing my comments with "what works or doesn't work for me is...." so that maybe it resonates with someone who also does best by being a stickler but does not discourage someone else who needs a little flexibility inside the guidelines to stick with it the entire 30 days. :0)
  22. Like
    Tom Denham reacted to Robin Strathdee in Don't over think this.   
    Welcome all newcomers, welcome back vets, and for those of you who never left...welcome to this post.
    I just wanted to pop in here and remind you all to take a deep breath before you dive into all the questions about what you can and can't have. The program guidelines are clear on what you can and can't have (grains, dairy, W30 muffins), but things get a little grey when people start talking about what you should and shouldn't have. Please don't over think think this. You don't have to address every food related issue you have, break every bad habit, and shun every food that gives you comfort to succeed with your Whole30. If you need to you can always extend or repeat the process, and things will get better each time you do. My advice to you is this:

    Stick to the rules like they are your port in a storm (really, they will become that).
    Take the Moderators responses seriously (we know what we're talking about).
    Take community members suggestions as advice from those who came before, but keep in mind they are not the rules and not the Mods. Everyone here is well-meaning, and everyone here wants to see you succeed, but everyone here is at a different place in this journey.
    And finally, take comfort in these words (from Melissa Hartwig, on another forum post):

    Here's the thing (and this is an interesting discussion)... there are Whole30 "rules," which are strict, clearly outlined, and very well defined. No grains - and here are all the things we consider grains. No dairy - and here are all the dairy items excluded. No Paleo-fied food choices, and here's what those look like.
    Then, there are Whole30 suggestions for success. They're not part of the official rules, but they're things that we've seen really help (or harm) people as they move through the program. Fruit smoothies for breakfast - not a good idea. Skipping breakfast - not a good idea. Eating every two hours, all day - not a good idea. These things won't necessarily affect your Whole30 results (although they might), but if we can give you additional suggestions that will make your transition and your program easier and more effective, we're going to give them to you.
    Keep Calm and Whole30 On.
  23. Like
    Tom Denham reacted to Alliea in Whole30 and Five Guys   
    When I was in the middle of my Whole30 (a month and half ago!) I wrote to Five Guys about their ingredients. Even though they have their nutritional info online, I grilled them (no pun) about any hidden ingredients that might now have been mentioned. I just now heard back from them. Here's what they said:
    Since 1986 Five Guys has focused on serving the freshest product in the simplest way possible. We do not add
    anything to our products. Our burgers are NOT seasoned, they are simply 80/20 ground beef, our mushrooms
    are sauteed on a flat top grill as they are with NO oil or butter. Our produce is cut fresh daily and does not have
    anything added to it as well. In fact, our nutritional information is located on website www.fiveguys.com if you
    would like you can also find the Five Guys story located under the About us tab.
    So, in the case of Five Guys, if you are willing to have a hamburger patty on a lettuce "bun" with just vegetables of various sorts as condiments, sounds like they would be legal in the Whole30 world. Since finishing the Whole30, I've been glad that I did this sort of research. I'm not eating out nearly as much, but when I do, I often just go paleo for that meal and that helps me feel like I'm not eating a bunch of garbage just because I'm eating out.
  24. Like
    Tom Denham reacted to Melissa Hartwig in Can I have Marijuana   
    I'm not really sure how to respond to this. First, as far as pain management goes for serious conditions, I am aware of the uses and benefits of marijuana. If this is something you've talked about with your doctor, I'd certainly support medical use. If you're taking your own pain management into your own hands, well, I can't really help you with that. Do I think 10% - 30% of marijuana users become addicted? The research shows that to be true. Do I think smoking anything (putting smoke into your lungs) makes you less healthy? I do. Do I think there are downstream effects of smoking/ingesting pot that may interfere with other healthy pursuits? Yep. Is it illegal? Still, yes (even in Washington, as far as the federal government is concerned).
    But I can't really tell you what to do in this situation, as I don't understand your chronic pain, and how ingesting this substance might help. Would we ever say marijuana is okay during the Whole30? Hell no. But you're all grown-up people with your own unique contexts and full awareness of the consequences of your actions, and you are free to engage in whatever behaviors you feel are appropriate for your situation.
    Best, Melissa
  25. Like
    Tom Denham reacted to missmary in 5 hour energy   
    not ok. not even close.
    5 hour energy is not real food. How about some Yerba Mate?