SugarcubeOD

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  1. Like
    SugarcubeOD reacted to laura_juggles in Help! Akward topic...diarrhea   
    Sounds like you just caught a bug and ignored it for a couple weeks until it got to the point that your doctor felt you needed multiple antibiotics to deal with it. The immune system doesn't fight toxins; it fights bacteria and viruses. The liver and kidneys are your body's "detox" system. 
  2. Like
    SugarcubeOD reacted to kirkor in Help! Akward topic...diarrhea   
    This seems implausible.
  3. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from ThomasTrain in Yeast extract   
    Yes, the .80 is worth it because part of what the Whole30 teaches you is that manufacturers put unnecessary additives and fillers in our food... We know that yeast extract is not necessary because you can find a slightly more expensive brand that doesn't have it... so the reason that unnecessary potentially harmful substance is in your fish is because they make more money off you by feeding you fillers.

    If that isn't worth .80 a can, I don't know what is!
  4. Like
    SugarcubeOD reacted to Emm in Plan a Whole30 dream vacation   
    I would go to Orgen Coast, southern coast. Rent a house on the ocean take lots of walks along the beach. Drives to fun places up in the hills. I would hit the markets for fresh fish and local Wagu beef and make delicious meals at home. I would go out to small restaurants where they will cater to distant needs.  That would be a dream. 
  5. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from JLHill in Don't over think this.   
    There's no real issue... if the coffee beans are flavored in the package, they'll have natural and artificial flavors... these are not ideal, but because labelling laws mean they have to call out alcohol, soy, dairy, wheat and sugar, if none of those items are on the label, you're good to go.
    You may want to do a bit of research about HOW your favorite brand of flavored coffee gets their flavors... natural and artificial flavors are born in a lab... it's not the best option but in my opinion, in one or two cups of coffee a day, it's not the end of the world and it's not going to affect your Whole30.
    That said, I'm talking beans with flavor either whole beans or ground coffee.  I'm not talking about those International Delights powders that are basically like hot chocolate powder.  If that's the kind of 'coffee' you're referring to, then it's 100% a problem because those are just a chemistry experiment of awfulness.
  6. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from RandiW in Headaches   
    Salt is an essential part of your body's functioning and when we remove processed, packaged, bagged, boxed and fast food from our diets we remove about 90% of the sodium... that does need to be replaced.  You should be salting your food always.
  7. Like
    SugarcubeOD reacted to ladyshanny in PSA: Don't Get Lost!   
    Public Service Announcement: 
    The group threads in this section of the forum can be extremely fast moving and as such, the volunteer moderators have a hard time keeping up with reading the hundreds of posts that go whizzing by.
    That said, if you are struggling or something doesn't seem right or you need some specific help, please create a new post in the Troubleshooting Your Whole30 portion of the forum. Make the title of your post as specific as possible to assist in getting a response sooner. For example, titling your post "Can't Break the 3pm Slump!" rather than just "Someone Please Help!" makes it quicker for the moderators to understand and assist you. 
    The moderators try to get to everything and we appreciate your patience but members following this outline is one of the ways that you can help us to help you!
  8. Thanks
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from jerrysgal4ever in Headaches   
    Actually, yes, snacking on basically junk food instead of eating real food, thereby depriving your body of actual nutrition IS likely contributing to the headache... she wasn't saying a Larabar is going to cause a headache, I think you are looking for an arguement which you're unlikely to get here.  If you don't like the program, it doesn't work for you or you're not interested in reading the material, that's fine, but you're asked to be polite in our house and calling our mods thoughtless and brainwashed doesn't fit the bill.
    You'll also take note of the fact that this program has been around and popular since 2009, so it's hardly a fad, being that it's coming up on just short of a decade... just food for thought.
  9. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from Bellmaestra in Whole30 Christmahannukwanzadan List 2017   
    Is this things people are putting on their list to Santa?
    In that case, microplane, large high quality sheet pan, crock pot
     
  10. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from ladyshanny in Whole30 Christmahannukwanzadan List 2017   
    Is this things people are putting on their list to Santa?
    In that case, microplane, large high quality sheet pan, crock pot
     
  11. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from AR3825 in NEW!! Coconut Aminos and Chips   
    NEW WHOLE30 RULES: CHIPS AND COCONUT AMINOS
    27 March, 2017
    From Whole30 headmistress Melissa Hartwig, who works really hard to make the program both effective and easy to follow
    It’s been a long time since I’ve issued any changes to the Whole30 rules; the last was in 2014, when we brought back the white potato. Making a rule change is a really big deal; it’s a huge communication effort to share the new information with millions of people worldwide and update all of our books and resources. But food manufacturers continue to create grain-free, dairy-free products that didn’t exist when I wrote the original Whole30 rules, and frankly, they’re making my job really hard here.
    After much research, discussion with my forum moderators, and consulting the Whole30 team, we concur it’s time to revise a few points, based on the current marketplace. Here are two new Whole30 rules, effective April 1, 2017 (or right now, since you’re reading it). If you want, just read the rules and apply, easy-peasy. If you want to hear the thought process behind the changes, however, I’ll describe in detail below.
    New Whole30 Rules
    No store-bought chips of any origin (potato, tortilla, plantain, coconut, kale…) Coconut aminos are an exception to the “no added sugar” rule (and continue to be permissible on the program)   No more plantain chips on the #Whole30? Spread the word; two NEW Whole30 rules. CLICK TO TWEET
      No Store-Bought Chips
    When we brought white potatoes back in 2014, one sticky issue was, “How do we keep people from eating French fries and potato chips, as those are obviously not in the spirit of the Whole30?” The answer was easy; saying, “No potato chips, and no restaurant or fast-food fries.” Back in 2014, all you could find in the store were potato chips or “Sweets n Beets.”  Kale or broccoli “chips” didn’t exist, tortilla chips were made only with corn, and plantain chips were just showing up on the scene, but not popular enough to be on our radar.
    Over the last few years, the variety of “healthy” chips in stores have exploded. You can now buy “nacho” flavored kale chips, cassava flour tortilla chips, and “roasted” plantain chips containing technically compliant Whole30 ingredients. This has caused great confusion in the community—kale chips must be okay because they’re kale, but what about plantain chips, or those potato chips fried in unrefined coconut oil? It was hard to keep up with; a fact I saw reflected in the #whole30 photos you’re posting on Instagram. In thinking about how to communicate my thoughts on the place of chips on the Whole30, I kept coming back to the central theme: Face-planting into a packaged bag of chips (of any nature) has no place in resetting your health, habits, and relationship with food.
    Especially plantain chips. You know you crack out on them, and news flash: THEY’RE NOT ACTUALLY HEALTHY.
    So, allow us to make it easy for you, and return to our Whole30 “real, whole, nutrient-dense” food roots: No store-bought chips. Period. Not even if they’re kale.  Not even if they’re roasted. Not even if they’re cooked in coconut oil. Chips of any nature are counter to the Whole30 mission, they’re pushing more nutrient-dense food off your plate, and they’re all too easy to turn into food with no brakes.
    It’s only 30 days, and you can do better.
    Feel free to make your own real-food version at home; bake kale leaves, pan-fry plantain slices, or roast potato wedges. But please, no deep-frying. That should go without saying.
    Coconut Aminos
    Coconut aminos (a soy sauce substitute made from coconut) came on the Whole30 scene around 2013. The first company to release the product was Coconut Secret, and the ingredients read, “Organic coconut ‘sap’ aged and blended with sun-dried, mineral-rich sea salt.” Based on this ingredient list*, it appeared totally Whole30 compliant. We began using aminos in our recipes and cookbooks, creating Asian-inspired dishes with exciting flavors.
    Today, we have a variety of aminos; Big Tree Farms is a major market player, and Thrive Market has their own brand of aminos. Trouble is, their ingredients read slightly different: “Organic fair trade coconut blossom nectar, sea salt.” And it’s that one word, “nectar,” that’s causing trouble, because in Whole30 lingo, “nectar” = “sugar.”
    I got on the phone with Elizabeth from Big Tree Farms, so she could explain the way aminos are made. The nectar itself is harvested from the coconut flower blossoms (not the tree itself, as the word “sap” might indicate). From there, you can do a few things with the nectar: brew it down with sea salt and water (natural fermentation may be part of this process) and turn it into aminos; dry it and allow it to granulate, turning it into coconut sugar; or sell it as coconut syrup, a liquid sweetener substitute.
    So technically, all aminos are derived from a sugar source—but not all labels are clear about that. Which means that according to the current rules, some brands of aminos are out, while some are allowed, based solely on the way the companies chose to write the ingredients on the label.
    Furthermore, unlike the other two forms of coconut nectar, aminos are not a sugar substitute.  Would you add it to your coffee or tea, or pour it over berries? (EW.)
    To avoid further confusion, we’re just going to write a new exclusion into the rules: “coconut aminos” are compliant for the program, even if the word “nectar” is on the label.
    *When you read the rest of the Coconut Secret label, the word “sap” is in quotation marks, and the bottle description does say it comes from “sap that exudes from the coconut blossom.” Consumers (myself included) assumed the product came from the tree (or the coconut itself), but it is sourced from the coconut blossom, just like the other brands. 
    Next Steps
    First, these new rules officially go into effect on April 1, 2017. If you’ve been eating ingredient-compliant plantain chips or store-bought kale chips, you don’t have to start over; just stop eating them. (And if you’ve been using aminos of any brand, nothing actually changes.)
    Second, we’d appreciate you helping us share the rules by reposting our Instagram post, sharing our Facebook post, or Tweeting about it (below).
      Have you heard? TWO new #Whole30 rules re: chips and coconut aminos! Details here. CLICK TO TWEET
      Third, we’ve already updated the Can I Have blog post, the Whole30 Program Rules, and the accompanying PDF. We’re also in the process of cleaning up old forum entries with out-of-date info. However, patience, please, as that process could take a while. I’m also working the revisions into immediate reprints of The Whole30 and The Whole30 Cookbook.
    Finally, we’ll be working with our partners at Thrive Market and Barefoot Provisions to remove kale chips from their Whole30 kits. This could take a little while, logistically.
    On behalf of the Whole30 team, thank you for your continued support and your tolerance for these occasional changes. We are always evaluating the rules for their logic, foundation in science, effectiveness, and ease of use. Balancing all of those isn’t always easy, but we think these changes encompass the spirit and intention of the program, while making it even easier for you to follow the rules.
    Even if you’re mad about the plantain chips.
  12. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from purplepadres in Headaches   
    Actually, yes, snacking on basically junk food instead of eating real food, thereby depriving your body of actual nutrition IS likely contributing to the headache... she wasn't saying a Larabar is going to cause a headache, I think you are looking for an arguement which you're unlikely to get here.  If you don't like the program, it doesn't work for you or you're not interested in reading the material, that's fine, but you're asked to be polite in our house and calling our mods thoughtless and brainwashed doesn't fit the bill.
    You'll also take note of the fact that this program has been around and popular since 2009, so it's hardly a fad, being that it's coming up on just short of a decade... just food for thought.
  13. Like
    SugarcubeOD reacted to Karen in Changes in Menstrual Cycle   
    I almost always have delayed ovulation if I start a Whole 30 before I ovulate, even if I was following pretty closely prior. I start them after ovulation now! Diet changes can throw the body for a loop... And the body is smart enough not to get pregnant when there are fast changes (think drought, famine back in caveman days), so ovulation can be delayed until it figures out conditions are safe for a possible pregnancy. Make sure you're eating plenty, and getting plenty of fat. Eventually, your body will realize conditions are great for conception and you'll ovulate. 
  14. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from kassiemn922 in Headaches   
    Actually, yes, snacking on basically junk food instead of eating real food, thereby depriving your body of actual nutrition IS likely contributing to the headache... she wasn't saying a Larabar is going to cause a headache, I think you are looking for an arguement which you're unlikely to get here.  If you don't like the program, it doesn't work for you or you're not interested in reading the material, that's fine, but you're asked to be polite in our house and calling our mods thoughtless and brainwashed doesn't fit the bill.
    You'll also take note of the fact that this program has been around and popular since 2009, so it's hardly a fad, being that it's coming up on just short of a decade... just food for thought.
  15. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from scrapstitching in NEW!! Coconut Aminos and Chips   
    NEW WHOLE30 RULES: CHIPS AND COCONUT AMINOS
    27 March, 2017
    From Whole30 headmistress Melissa Hartwig, who works really hard to make the program both effective and easy to follow
    It’s been a long time since I’ve issued any changes to the Whole30 rules; the last was in 2014, when we brought back the white potato. Making a rule change is a really big deal; it’s a huge communication effort to share the new information with millions of people worldwide and update all of our books and resources. But food manufacturers continue to create grain-free, dairy-free products that didn’t exist when I wrote the original Whole30 rules, and frankly, they’re making my job really hard here.
    After much research, discussion with my forum moderators, and consulting the Whole30 team, we concur it’s time to revise a few points, based on the current marketplace. Here are two new Whole30 rules, effective April 1, 2017 (or right now, since you’re reading it). If you want, just read the rules and apply, easy-peasy. If you want to hear the thought process behind the changes, however, I’ll describe in detail below.
    New Whole30 Rules
    No store-bought chips of any origin (potato, tortilla, plantain, coconut, kale…) Coconut aminos are an exception to the “no added sugar” rule (and continue to be permissible on the program)   No more plantain chips on the #Whole30? Spread the word; two NEW Whole30 rules. CLICK TO TWEET
      No Store-Bought Chips
    When we brought white potatoes back in 2014, one sticky issue was, “How do we keep people from eating French fries and potato chips, as those are obviously not in the spirit of the Whole30?” The answer was easy; saying, “No potato chips, and no restaurant or fast-food fries.” Back in 2014, all you could find in the store were potato chips or “Sweets n Beets.”  Kale or broccoli “chips” didn’t exist, tortilla chips were made only with corn, and plantain chips were just showing up on the scene, but not popular enough to be on our radar.
    Over the last few years, the variety of “healthy” chips in stores have exploded. You can now buy “nacho” flavored kale chips, cassava flour tortilla chips, and “roasted” plantain chips containing technically compliant Whole30 ingredients. This has caused great confusion in the community—kale chips must be okay because they’re kale, but what about plantain chips, or those potato chips fried in unrefined coconut oil? It was hard to keep up with; a fact I saw reflected in the #whole30 photos you’re posting on Instagram. In thinking about how to communicate my thoughts on the place of chips on the Whole30, I kept coming back to the central theme: Face-planting into a packaged bag of chips (of any nature) has no place in resetting your health, habits, and relationship with food.
    Especially plantain chips. You know you crack out on them, and news flash: THEY’RE NOT ACTUALLY HEALTHY.
    So, allow us to make it easy for you, and return to our Whole30 “real, whole, nutrient-dense” food roots: No store-bought chips. Period. Not even if they’re kale.  Not even if they’re roasted. Not even if they’re cooked in coconut oil. Chips of any nature are counter to the Whole30 mission, they’re pushing more nutrient-dense food off your plate, and they’re all too easy to turn into food with no brakes.
    It’s only 30 days, and you can do better.
    Feel free to make your own real-food version at home; bake kale leaves, pan-fry plantain slices, or roast potato wedges. But please, no deep-frying. That should go without saying.
    Coconut Aminos
    Coconut aminos (a soy sauce substitute made from coconut) came on the Whole30 scene around 2013. The first company to release the product was Coconut Secret, and the ingredients read, “Organic coconut ‘sap’ aged and blended with sun-dried, mineral-rich sea salt.” Based on this ingredient list*, it appeared totally Whole30 compliant. We began using aminos in our recipes and cookbooks, creating Asian-inspired dishes with exciting flavors.
    Today, we have a variety of aminos; Big Tree Farms is a major market player, and Thrive Market has their own brand of aminos. Trouble is, their ingredients read slightly different: “Organic fair trade coconut blossom nectar, sea salt.” And it’s that one word, “nectar,” that’s causing trouble, because in Whole30 lingo, “nectar” = “sugar.”
    I got on the phone with Elizabeth from Big Tree Farms, so she could explain the way aminos are made. The nectar itself is harvested from the coconut flower blossoms (not the tree itself, as the word “sap” might indicate). From there, you can do a few things with the nectar: brew it down with sea salt and water (natural fermentation may be part of this process) and turn it into aminos; dry it and allow it to granulate, turning it into coconut sugar; or sell it as coconut syrup, a liquid sweetener substitute.
    So technically, all aminos are derived from a sugar source—but not all labels are clear about that. Which means that according to the current rules, some brands of aminos are out, while some are allowed, based solely on the way the companies chose to write the ingredients on the label.
    Furthermore, unlike the other two forms of coconut nectar, aminos are not a sugar substitute.  Would you add it to your coffee or tea, or pour it over berries? (EW.)
    To avoid further confusion, we’re just going to write a new exclusion into the rules: “coconut aminos” are compliant for the program, even if the word “nectar” is on the label.
    *When you read the rest of the Coconut Secret label, the word “sap” is in quotation marks, and the bottle description does say it comes from “sap that exudes from the coconut blossom.” Consumers (myself included) assumed the product came from the tree (or the coconut itself), but it is sourced from the coconut blossom, just like the other brands. 
    Next Steps
    First, these new rules officially go into effect on April 1, 2017. If you’ve been eating ingredient-compliant plantain chips or store-bought kale chips, you don’t have to start over; just stop eating them. (And if you’ve been using aminos of any brand, nothing actually changes.)
    Second, we’d appreciate you helping us share the rules by reposting our Instagram post, sharing our Facebook post, or Tweeting about it (below).
      Have you heard? TWO new #Whole30 rules re: chips and coconut aminos! Details here. CLICK TO TWEET
      Third, we’ve already updated the Can I Have blog post, the Whole30 Program Rules, and the accompanying PDF. We’re also in the process of cleaning up old forum entries with out-of-date info. However, patience, please, as that process could take a while. I’m also working the revisions into immediate reprints of The Whole30 and The Whole30 Cookbook.
    Finally, we’ll be working with our partners at Thrive Market and Barefoot Provisions to remove kale chips from their Whole30 kits. This could take a little while, logistically.
    On behalf of the Whole30 team, thank you for your continued support and your tolerance for these occasional changes. We are always evaluating the rules for their logic, foundation in science, effectiveness, and ease of use. Balancing all of those isn’t always easy, but we think these changes encompass the spirit and intention of the program, while making it even easier for you to follow the rules.
    Even if you’re mad about the plantain chips.
  16. Like
    SugarcubeOD reacted to scoakley13 in Headaches   
    People who create accounts just to voice their disagreement/disapproval on things they know nothing about have empty lives. Please be assured that no one here cares about your opinion or your know-it-all condescending attitude. Go back to facebook or your blog (an assumption on my part but I'll bet $5 you have one) if you need attention that bad. 
  17. Like
    SugarcubeOD reacted to laura_juggles in Headaches   
    Also, dude, that list of "worst diets" was a list of "worst diets for weight loss". Absolutely nowhere is Whole30 advertised as a weight loss plan. In fact, it's regularly mentioned that it's not. Lots of people do lose weight on a Whole30 because by giving the body better quality food and not a free pass to snack (lots of those "weight loss plans" basically have you eating little bits of food constantly), folks lose some weight. 
    Blood sugar spikes can cause headaches. What causes blood sugar spikes? Sugary foods, whether it's a Snickers or a Larabar. 
    Most folks don't know how to listen to their bodies without some guidance. I had no idea that legumes were what made me feel like death warmed up until I did a Whole30 with the proper reintroductions. I wouldn't have had a framework to figure out what was making me feel bad if it wasn't for the Whole30. 
  18. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from jmcbn in Headaches   
    Actually, yes, snacking on basically junk food instead of eating real food, thereby depriving your body of actual nutrition IS likely contributing to the headache... she wasn't saying a Larabar is going to cause a headache, I think you are looking for an arguement which you're unlikely to get here.  If you don't like the program, it doesn't work for you or you're not interested in reading the material, that's fine, but you're asked to be polite in our house and calling our mods thoughtless and brainwashed doesn't fit the bill.
    You'll also take note of the fact that this program has been around and popular since 2009, so it's hardly a fad, being that it's coming up on just short of a decade... just food for thought.
  19. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from TrayS in Headaches   
    Actually, yes, snacking on basically junk food instead of eating real food, thereby depriving your body of actual nutrition IS likely contributing to the headache... she wasn't saying a Larabar is going to cause a headache, I think you are looking for an arguement which you're unlikely to get here.  If you don't like the program, it doesn't work for you or you're not interested in reading the material, that's fine, but you're asked to be polite in our house and calling our mods thoughtless and brainwashed doesn't fit the bill.
    You'll also take note of the fact that this program has been around and popular since 2009, so it's hardly a fad, being that it's coming up on just short of a decade... just food for thought.
  20. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from Ermatlanta in Don't over think this.   
    There's no real issue... if the coffee beans are flavored in the package, they'll have natural and artificial flavors... these are not ideal, but because labelling laws mean they have to call out alcohol, soy, dairy, wheat and sugar, if none of those items are on the label, you're good to go.
    You may want to do a bit of research about HOW your favorite brand of flavored coffee gets their flavors... natural and artificial flavors are born in a lab... it's not the best option but in my opinion, in one or two cups of coffee a day, it's not the end of the world and it's not going to affect your Whole30.
    That said, I'm talking beans with flavor either whole beans or ground coffee.  I'm not talking about those International Delights powders that are basically like hot chocolate powder.  If that's the kind of 'coffee' you're referring to, then it's 100% a problem because those are just a chemistry experiment of awfulness.
  21. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from Kisamose in Whole30 with toddlers.   
    I have no tips or advice as I do not own any children but it stands out to me that if your 2 and 4 year old are having carb flu/detox type symptoms, this is probably the best thing you can do for them!
  22. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from SweetEnough in Kombucha Makers Unite; Where to ask and be answered   
    @SweetEnough - that's so cute!  I know most of the people that have weighed in on this thread are following it so they'll get a notification when people post   
  23. Like
    SugarcubeOD reacted to SweetEnough in Kombucha Makers Unite; Where to ask and be answered   
    Hello, kombucha homies! I am hoping to revitalize this thread to connect with others who are currently brewing. I am brand new to this craft and should have my first fermentation ready this week. Very exciting! I'm attaching a photo of Toby, which I grew myself from a bottle of raw, unflavored GT's kombucha, and also Maggie, who I purchased over the weekend from a Craigslist ad.
    I'd love to see your pics too! I'm sure in the next several days I'll have questions, so I'm hoping there are still those of you out there who are actively booching.

  24. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from MeadowLily in Whole30 with toddlers.   
    Maybe you should take her to the doctor...
  25. Like
    SugarcubeOD got a reaction from gothope77 in Coconut Aminos and Chips   
    NEW WHOLE30 RULES: CHIPS AND COCONUT AMINOS
    27 March, 2017
    From Whole30 headmistress Melissa Hartwig, who works really hard to make the program both effective and easy to follow
    It’s been a long time since I’ve issued any changes to the Whole30 rules; the last was in 2014, when we brought back the white potato. Making a rule change is a really big deal; it’s a huge communication effort to share the new information with millions of people worldwide and update all of our books and resources. But food manufacturers continue to create grain-free, dairy-free products that didn’t exist when I wrote the original Whole30 rules, and frankly, they’re making my job really hard here.
    After much research, discussion with my forum moderators, and consulting the Whole30 team, we concur it’s time to revise a few points, based on the current marketplace. Here are two new Whole30 rules, effective April 1, 2017 (or right now, since you’re reading it). If you want, just read the rules and apply, easy-peasy. If you want to hear the thought process behind the changes, however, I’ll describe in detail below.
    New Whole30 Rules
    No store-bought chips of any origin (potato, tortilla, plantain, coconut, kale…) Coconut aminos are an exception to the “no added sugar” rule (and continue to be permissible on the program)   No more plantain chips on the #Whole30? Spread the word; two NEW Whole30 rules. CLICK TO TWEET
      No Store-Bought Chips
    When we brought white potatoes back in 2014, one sticky issue was, “How do we keep people from eating French fries and potato chips, as those are obviously not in the spirit of the Whole30?” The answer was easy; saying, “No potato chips, and no restaurant or fast-food fries.” Back in 2014, all you could find in the store were potato chips or “Sweets n Beets.”  Kale or broccoli “chips” didn’t exist, tortilla chips were made only with corn, and plantain chips were just showing up on the scene, but not popular enough to be on our radar.
    Over the last few years, the variety of “healthy” chips in stores have exploded. You can now buy “nacho” flavored kale chips, cassava flour tortilla chips, and “roasted” plantain chips containing technically compliant Whole30 ingredients. This has caused great confusion in the community—kale chips must be okay because they’re kale, but what about plantain chips, or those potato chips fried in unrefined coconut oil? It was hard to keep up with; a fact I saw reflected in the #whole30 photos you’re posting on Instagram. In thinking about how to communicate my thoughts on the place of chips on the Whole30, I kept coming back to the central theme: Face-planting into a packaged bag of chips (of any nature) has no place in resetting your health, habits, and relationship with food.
    Especially plantain chips. You know you crack out on them, and news flash: THEY’RE NOT ACTUALLY HEALTHY.
    So, allow us to make it easy for you, and return to our Whole30 “real, whole, nutrient-dense” food roots: No store-bought chips. Period. Not even if they’re kale.  Not even if they’re roasted. Not even if they’re cooked in coconut oil. Chips of any nature are counter to the Whole30 mission, they’re pushing more nutrient-dense food off your plate, and they’re all too easy to turn into food with no brakes.
    It’s only 30 days, and you can do better.
    Feel free to make your own real-food version at home; bake kale leaves, pan-fry plantain slices, or roast potato wedges. But please, no deep-frying. That should go without saying.
    Coconut Aminos
    Coconut aminos (a soy sauce substitute made from coconut) came on the Whole30 scene around 2013. The first company to release the product was Coconut Secret, and the ingredients read, “Organic coconut ‘sap’ aged and blended with sun-dried, mineral-rich sea salt.” Based on this ingredient list*, it appeared totally Whole30 compliant. We began using aminos in our recipes and cookbooks, creating Asian-inspired dishes with exciting flavors.
    Today, we have a variety of aminos; Big Tree Farms is a major market player, and Thrive Market has their own brand of aminos. Trouble is, their ingredients read slightly different: “Organic fair trade coconut blossom nectar, sea salt.” And it’s that one word, “nectar,” that’s causing trouble, because in Whole30 lingo, “nectar” = “sugar.”
    I got on the phone with Elizabeth from Big Tree Farms, so she could explain the way aminos are made. The nectar itself is harvested from the coconut flower blossoms (not the tree itself, as the word “sap” might indicate). From there, you can do a few things with the nectar: brew it down with sea salt and water (natural fermentation may be part of this process) and turn it into aminos; dry it and allow it to granulate, turning it into coconut sugar; or sell it as coconut syrup, a liquid sweetener substitute.
    So technically, all aminos are derived from a sugar source—but not all labels are clear about that. Which means that according to the current rules, some brands of aminos are out, while some are allowed, based solely on the way the companies chose to write the ingredients on the label.
    Furthermore, unlike the other two forms of coconut nectar, aminos are not a sugar substitute.  Would you add it to your coffee or tea, or pour it over berries? (EW.)
    To avoid further confusion, we’re just going to write a new exclusion into the rules: “coconut aminos” are compliant for the program, even if the word “nectar” is on the label.
    *When you read the rest of the Coconut Secret label, the word “sap” is in quotation marks, and the bottle description does say it comes from “sap that exudes from the coconut blossom.” Consumers (myself included) assumed the product came from the tree (or the coconut itself), but it is sourced from the coconut blossom, just like the other brands. 
    Next Steps
    First, these new rules officially go into effect on April 1, 2017. If you’ve been eating ingredient-compliant plantain chips or store-bought kale chips, you don’t have to start over; just stop eating them. (And if you’ve been using aminos of any brand, nothing actually changes.)
    Second, we’d appreciate you helping us share the rules by reposting our Instagram post, sharing our Facebook post, or Tweeting about it (below).
      Have you heard? TWO new #Whole30 rules re: chips and coconut aminos! Details here. CLICK TO TWEET
      Third, we’ve already updated the Can I Have blog post, the Whole30 Program Rules, and the accompanying PDF. We’re also in the process of cleaning up old forum entries with out-of-date info. However, patience, please, as that process could take a while. I’m also working the revisions into immediate reprints of The Whole30 and The Whole30 Cookbook.
    Finally, we’ll be working with our partners at Thrive Market and Barefoot Provisions to remove kale chips from their Whole30 kits. This could take a little while, logistically.
    On behalf of the Whole30 team, thank you for your continued support and your tolerance for these occasional changes. We are always evaluating the rules for their logic, foundation in science, effectiveness, and ease of use. Balancing all of those isn’t always easy, but we think these changes encompass the spirit and intention of the program, while making it even easier for you to follow the rules.
    Even if you’re mad about the plantain chips.