annc3333

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  1. Like
    annc3333 reacted to versefaerie in Have Interstitial Cystitis? please post here   
    Hey! I am on Day 2 of Whole30 for the very first time! I have Interstitial cystitis/pelvic floor dysfunction with related chronic pain, IBS, my docs also think I likely have endometriosis (they co-occur quite frequently!), also have ADHD, horrible seasonal allergies that affect the IC, allergic asthma, and possibly fibro.  I've been diagnosed with IC since 2009- recently after actively pursuing acupuncture (not just going for flares, but going for maintenance), seeing an herbalist, in addition to my PCP/specialist, I've been getting a lot better.  I'm a nurse practitioner by day, musician/composer/performer by night, 32 yrs old.  
    This year alone I've gotten down from around 12 meds to 5 meds (YAY!); my full time day job is nuts, so it has been very challenging to get enough time to take care of myself- but this year, I promised myself I would find the right path to healing.  
    I'm really excited to see how this helps the gut/bladder/more importantly the immune system heal, as I feel at this point I have an overall problem with my immune response/neuroendocrine system.
    I am kind of expecting to pee forever in the first couple days or so of this diet- it is only natural with this level of metabolic shift- but eventually, does the constant feeling dehydrated/drinking tons of water/endless-Type-1-Diabetes-level polyuria (peeing A LOT) fade away once the body adjusts to the new metabolic reset?  Luckily, my pain so far is controlled, just frequency/urgency gets so annoying- but I will follow through with it if it will help me heal!  
  2. Like
    annc3333 reacted to ladyshanny in Older women following Whole30   
    That's true, SuAnn.  Sort of.  Weight loss isn't a calorie equation though, as much as the diet industry would have us believe that it is.  Weight loss comes when the body is healthy and hormonally balanced.  Because many people come to Whole30 with a host of medical issues, they can do all the right things and eat per our template and lists and still not lose weight because their bodies are prioritizing healing over weight loss and hormone balancing.  And that's totally fine!
     
    We also have good number of people coming here after years of calorie restriction.  Unfortunately the less you eat, the less your metabolic fire burns which means that you need to eat less and less just to maintain.  Folks come to Whole30 and we tell them to eat food.  Eat. Food!  Protein and fat and veggies and all teh good stuff.  As much as you need to get you 4-5 hours between meals.  Sometimes, if they have been restricting, their metabolism is slowed and their hormones are all wacky and they may temporarily experience a gain rather than a loss.  Because the body needs to get used to and trust that there is no famine coming, it hangs onto everything it's being given.  
     
    Finally, there's "weight to lose" and there's the weight people (mostly women) want to lose because they have been programmed to believe that they need to be smaller, leaner, fitter.  Women are genetically designed to carry extra fat, we're not meant to be lean.  The women that we are given to match ourselves to are airbrushed and photoshopped.  Even the women in the magazines don't exist although you can clearly see a "photo" of them.  If you are eating enough food to nourish your body and your lifestyle and you don't immediately (or ever) lose weight, that can be an excellent trigger to re-examine the things you believe about how you need to look in order to be a valuable human being.  (tip: your value has nothing to do with your appearance)
     
    Those are just some of the reasons why we ask people not to focus on weight loss during the Whole30.  I could give you more.............
     

  3. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeGA"gardener" in W30 and "morbid obesity"   
    I've just read this entire strand beginning to end, and I find myself emotional, the intense struggles that so many of us have had just trying to feed our bodies-- the hopelessness, decades of futile efforts that have left us fatter than when we started, knowing we are getting sicker and sicker--whether we are over eating or under eating, the impact on our bodies have been the same.

     

    I am realizing, in all my lifetime of trying to control my weight and be healthy, the following idea has never really come together for me:  Eat as much healthy food as satisfies me but only three times a day--and leave everything else alone.

     

    I've certainly tried eating all I want of anything I want at any time of day or night--result:  fatter and fatter, sicker and sicker, exhausted.  I've tried severely restricting food to those foods that are "diet" foods (ie. lettuce and diet soda)--result:  thinner but sicker and sicker, less and less muscle tone, exhausted and then regain plus another five.  

     

    I've never once, that I can remember, been free of the scale or free of the obsessional worry of where my weight is at any minute of the day or night.

     

    What I know for sure is that the more I obsess over how much I eat and how much I lose or gain the sicker I get and the less weight my body will want to give up.  The mind controls the hormones and the cortisol.  All the self imposed stress is killing me.    

     

    I've been hanging out here for about six weeks now.  I've been leery of jumping into another "food plan" with rules and various restrictions.  I've been leery of eating so much meat and fat.  I been leery of trying another best-selling "Diet Breakthrough!"  However, when you step back from it, it is just kind of old fashioned common sense.  Three meals a day--protein, veggies, fat and carbs.  Maybe I can just relax and quit fussing about it all and go live my life without all this struggle around feeding myself.  Maybe I can just eat this sensible diet with lots of sensible choices and not worry about what I am not eating. Maybe I can allow a little bit of hunger before the next meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can allow a little bit of being full after a meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can just stop freaking out altogether and give myself the gift of time and relaxation around food.

     

    Yea, lets give it a shot. Why not try something completely new and radical!--the eat and not freak out approach!  
  4. Like
    annc3333 reacted to ThyPeace in Help. Desperation. Accountability.   
    Keep trying!  Remember -- you can choose to have sugar another time.  I do it all the time.  "That looks good!  I'll try it sometime later."
     
    ThyPeace, trying to leave on a jet plane.  Only two cancellations so far today.  Sigh.
  5. Like
    annc3333 reacted to MrsStick in Help. Desperation. Accountability.   
    Just wanted to pop in to say that you're doing great! It's really hard to do what you're doing, so kudos to you. I second the motion to treat yourself in a non-food way if you can so you still feel like you're getting something special. Even if it's drinking out of a fancy glass after dinner (not wine!) do something so that your brain knows you aren't punishing yourself. Paint your nails, take a bath, even if it's just shaving your legs (because if you get a good shave isn't it tempting to run around the house without pants on screaming that you are a goddess? So SMOOOOOOOOOOOOOTH. Or maybe it's just me...). Take some time and read a book you want to read (but don't have to read). Just do something nice for yourself.
  6. Like
    annc3333 reacted to MTNan in Help. Desperation. Accountability.   
    I've gotten off track recently too, courtesy of a vacation. I have a couple things I'm focusing on to try to get back to better food choices, maybe we can help each other out! One thing I do: you know that crappy feeling you get when you eat crappy food (pop tarts for you, beer/wine for me!)? I hang onto that feeling tight, and remind myself that I do not want to feel like that all the time. I really like being able to bound out of bed (ok, that might be pushing it a little, I don't really bound...) and attack my day with a great attitude and lots of energy. I find if I focus on the end result of my food choices rather than the choices themselves, that I do better.
    Another thing I have done to start getting back on track, is I picked out a few of my very favorite foods from my whole30 (homemade mayo currently tops my list!), and decided to try to build my meals around those foods. It might sounds completely ridiculous to build a meal around a fat, but if it keeps me compliant and on template, I say that's a success.
    I have also found that the more poor food choices I make, the worse my kids and husband eat as well. If my kids see me grabbing low-quality processed food from the cupboard, they usually see it as a green light to follow suit, so I'm trying to get back on track to set a good example for them too.
    I'm not a caregive for anybody at home, but I work in health care; seeing the poor healing and quality of life that comes from years of poor health habits helps to give perspective and is a great reminder of the importance of health.
    Find your reasons and your motivation and cling to those tenaciously!
  7. Like
    annc3333 reacted to ShannonM816 in Help. Desperation. Accountability.   
    Hi, Sue! I'm sorry you're having a rough time. I don't have the same experiences you do as far as being a caregiver, but I definitely understand falling back into old habits and how hard it is to get back to healthy eating.
    First, I want to say that your sugar dragon hasn't defeated you. You're here, asking for help, so you're still in that fight. It may feel like you're losing, but you can overcome this.
    As far as what you should do, that depends on what you feel you can commit to right now. Is a full whole30 a realistic goal for you? If it is, great! If it's not right now, that's okay too. Maybe right now all you can do is focus on making better choices most of the time. That's fine. Choosing eggs and veggies over a pop tart today is a good choice. Tomorrow (or at your next meal), try to make that same good choice again. If some days you don't, that's okay, you'll get another chance to make a good choice at your next meal. Just aim for more healthy choices than unhealthy, and when you've done that for a while, you may find you're in a better place to commit to a whole30 if that's what you want to do, or to your own healthy plan, whatever that looks like.
  8. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeGA"gardener" in W30 and "morbid obesity"   
    I've just read this entire strand beginning to end, and I find myself emotional, the intense struggles that so many of us have had just trying to feed our bodies-- the hopelessness, decades of futile efforts that have left us fatter than when we started, knowing we are getting sicker and sicker--whether we are over eating or under eating, the impact on our bodies have been the same.

     

    I am realizing, in all my lifetime of trying to control my weight and be healthy, the following idea has never really come together for me:  Eat as much healthy food as satisfies me but only three times a day--and leave everything else alone.

     

    I've certainly tried eating all I want of anything I want at any time of day or night--result:  fatter and fatter, sicker and sicker, exhausted.  I've tried severely restricting food to those foods that are "diet" foods (ie. lettuce and diet soda)--result:  thinner but sicker and sicker, less and less muscle tone, exhausted and then regain plus another five.  

     

    I've never once, that I can remember, been free of the scale or free of the obsessional worry of where my weight is at any minute of the day or night.

     

    What I know for sure is that the more I obsess over how much I eat and how much I lose or gain the sicker I get and the less weight my body will want to give up.  The mind controls the hormones and the cortisol.  All the self imposed stress is killing me.    

     

    I've been hanging out here for about six weeks now.  I've been leery of jumping into another "food plan" with rules and various restrictions.  I've been leery of eating so much meat and fat.  I been leery of trying another best-selling "Diet Breakthrough!"  However, when you step back from it, it is just kind of old fashioned common sense.  Three meals a day--protein, veggies, fat and carbs.  Maybe I can just relax and quit fussing about it all and go live my life without all this struggle around feeding myself.  Maybe I can just eat this sensible diet with lots of sensible choices and not worry about what I am not eating. Maybe I can allow a little bit of hunger before the next meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can allow a little bit of being full after a meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can just stop freaking out altogether and give myself the gift of time and relaxation around food.

     

    Yea, lets give it a shot. Why not try something completely new and radical!--the eat and not freak out approach!  
  9. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeGA"gardener" in W30 and "morbid obesity"   
    I've just read this entire strand beginning to end, and I find myself emotional, the intense struggles that so many of us have had just trying to feed our bodies-- the hopelessness, decades of futile efforts that have left us fatter than when we started, knowing we are getting sicker and sicker--whether we are over eating or under eating, the impact on our bodies have been the same.

     

    I am realizing, in all my lifetime of trying to control my weight and be healthy, the following idea has never really come together for me:  Eat as much healthy food as satisfies me but only three times a day--and leave everything else alone.

     

    I've certainly tried eating all I want of anything I want at any time of day or night--result:  fatter and fatter, sicker and sicker, exhausted.  I've tried severely restricting food to those foods that are "diet" foods (ie. lettuce and diet soda)--result:  thinner but sicker and sicker, less and less muscle tone, exhausted and then regain plus another five.  

     

    I've never once, that I can remember, been free of the scale or free of the obsessional worry of where my weight is at any minute of the day or night.

     

    What I know for sure is that the more I obsess over how much I eat and how much I lose or gain the sicker I get and the less weight my body will want to give up.  The mind controls the hormones and the cortisol.  All the self imposed stress is killing me.    

     

    I've been hanging out here for about six weeks now.  I've been leery of jumping into another "food plan" with rules and various restrictions.  I've been leery of eating so much meat and fat.  I been leery of trying another best-selling "Diet Breakthrough!"  However, when you step back from it, it is just kind of old fashioned common sense.  Three meals a day--protein, veggies, fat and carbs.  Maybe I can just relax and quit fussing about it all and go live my life without all this struggle around feeding myself.  Maybe I can just eat this sensible diet with lots of sensible choices and not worry about what I am not eating. Maybe I can allow a little bit of hunger before the next meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can allow a little bit of being full after a meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can just stop freaking out altogether and give myself the gift of time and relaxation around food.

     

    Yea, lets give it a shot. Why not try something completely new and radical!--the eat and not freak out approach!  
  10. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from Munkers in Changing meal times   
    That makes sense, having an extra hard boiled egg and some cucumber and a bit of olive oil in the late afternoon so as to have a later dinner is doable and shouldn't make a huge difference on outcomes, I wouldn't think.  
  11. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeadowLily in Fasting   
    I"ve had almost the exact same experience as AuntJane, but for me, it wasn't "Intermittent Fasting" it was just decades of not bothering to pack a lunch or thinking that it was smart to keep all the calories available for the evening when I knew I was going to be eating all evening anyway.  My health issues are much like hers, more and more severe allergy symptoms over the years, very painful vulvodynia and interstitial cystitis sparked by food triggers.  And it never kept my weight down anyway, I probably ate twice the calories in the evenings than I ever would have if I had been well fueled during the day.  Add to that, a very high carb diet based on the "low fat" myth that we were all sold, and I think it is lucky I am as healthy as I am.  Blah, so many serious mistakes over the years!
  12. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeGA"gardener" in W30 and "morbid obesity"   
    I've just read this entire strand beginning to end, and I find myself emotional, the intense struggles that so many of us have had just trying to feed our bodies-- the hopelessness, decades of futile efforts that have left us fatter than when we started, knowing we are getting sicker and sicker--whether we are over eating or under eating, the impact on our bodies have been the same.

     

    I am realizing, in all my lifetime of trying to control my weight and be healthy, the following idea has never really come together for me:  Eat as much healthy food as satisfies me but only three times a day--and leave everything else alone.

     

    I've certainly tried eating all I want of anything I want at any time of day or night--result:  fatter and fatter, sicker and sicker, exhausted.  I've tried severely restricting food to those foods that are "diet" foods (ie. lettuce and diet soda)--result:  thinner but sicker and sicker, less and less muscle tone, exhausted and then regain plus another five.  

     

    I've never once, that I can remember, been free of the scale or free of the obsessional worry of where my weight is at any minute of the day or night.

     

    What I know for sure is that the more I obsess over how much I eat and how much I lose or gain the sicker I get and the less weight my body will want to give up.  The mind controls the hormones and the cortisol.  All the self imposed stress is killing me.    

     

    I've been hanging out here for about six weeks now.  I've been leery of jumping into another "food plan" with rules and various restrictions.  I've been leery of eating so much meat and fat.  I been leery of trying another best-selling "Diet Breakthrough!"  However, when you step back from it, it is just kind of old fashioned common sense.  Three meals a day--protein, veggies, fat and carbs.  Maybe I can just relax and quit fussing about it all and go live my life without all this struggle around feeding myself.  Maybe I can just eat this sensible diet with lots of sensible choices and not worry about what I am not eating. Maybe I can allow a little bit of hunger before the next meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can allow a little bit of being full after a meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can just stop freaking out altogether and give myself the gift of time and relaxation around food.

     

    Yea, lets give it a shot. Why not try something completely new and radical!--the eat and not freak out approach!  
  13. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeGA"gardener" in W30 and "morbid obesity"   
    I've just read this entire strand beginning to end, and I find myself emotional, the intense struggles that so many of us have had just trying to feed our bodies-- the hopelessness, decades of futile efforts that have left us fatter than when we started, knowing we are getting sicker and sicker--whether we are over eating or under eating, the impact on our bodies have been the same.

     

    I am realizing, in all my lifetime of trying to control my weight and be healthy, the following idea has never really come together for me:  Eat as much healthy food as satisfies me but only three times a day--and leave everything else alone.

     

    I've certainly tried eating all I want of anything I want at any time of day or night--result:  fatter and fatter, sicker and sicker, exhausted.  I've tried severely restricting food to those foods that are "diet" foods (ie. lettuce and diet soda)--result:  thinner but sicker and sicker, less and less muscle tone, exhausted and then regain plus another five.  

     

    I've never once, that I can remember, been free of the scale or free of the obsessional worry of where my weight is at any minute of the day or night.

     

    What I know for sure is that the more I obsess over how much I eat and how much I lose or gain the sicker I get and the less weight my body will want to give up.  The mind controls the hormones and the cortisol.  All the self imposed stress is killing me.    

     

    I've been hanging out here for about six weeks now.  I've been leery of jumping into another "food plan" with rules and various restrictions.  I've been leery of eating so much meat and fat.  I been leery of trying another best-selling "Diet Breakthrough!"  However, when you step back from it, it is just kind of old fashioned common sense.  Three meals a day--protein, veggies, fat and carbs.  Maybe I can just relax and quit fussing about it all and go live my life without all this struggle around feeding myself.  Maybe I can just eat this sensible diet with lots of sensible choices and not worry about what I am not eating. Maybe I can allow a little bit of hunger before the next meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can allow a little bit of being full after a meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can just stop freaking out altogether and give myself the gift of time and relaxation around food.

     

    Yea, lets give it a shot. Why not try something completely new and radical!--the eat and not freak out approach!  
  14. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeGA"gardener" in W30 and "morbid obesity"   
    I've just read this entire strand beginning to end, and I find myself emotional, the intense struggles that so many of us have had just trying to feed our bodies-- the hopelessness, decades of futile efforts that have left us fatter than when we started, knowing we are getting sicker and sicker--whether we are over eating or under eating, the impact on our bodies have been the same.

     

    I am realizing, in all my lifetime of trying to control my weight and be healthy, the following idea has never really come together for me:  Eat as much healthy food as satisfies me but only three times a day--and leave everything else alone.

     

    I've certainly tried eating all I want of anything I want at any time of day or night--result:  fatter and fatter, sicker and sicker, exhausted.  I've tried severely restricting food to those foods that are "diet" foods (ie. lettuce and diet soda)--result:  thinner but sicker and sicker, less and less muscle tone, exhausted and then regain plus another five.  

     

    I've never once, that I can remember, been free of the scale or free of the obsessional worry of where my weight is at any minute of the day or night.

     

    What I know for sure is that the more I obsess over how much I eat and how much I lose or gain the sicker I get and the less weight my body will want to give up.  The mind controls the hormones and the cortisol.  All the self imposed stress is killing me.    

     

    I've been hanging out here for about six weeks now.  I've been leery of jumping into another "food plan" with rules and various restrictions.  I've been leery of eating so much meat and fat.  I been leery of trying another best-selling "Diet Breakthrough!"  However, when you step back from it, it is just kind of old fashioned common sense.  Three meals a day--protein, veggies, fat and carbs.  Maybe I can just relax and quit fussing about it all and go live my life without all this struggle around feeding myself.  Maybe I can just eat this sensible diet with lots of sensible choices and not worry about what I am not eating. Maybe I can allow a little bit of hunger before the next meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can allow a little bit of being full after a meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can just stop freaking out altogether and give myself the gift of time and relaxation around food.

     

    Yea, lets give it a shot. Why not try something completely new and radical!--the eat and not freak out approach!  
  15. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeGA"gardener" in W30 and "morbid obesity"   
    I've just read this entire strand beginning to end, and I find myself emotional, the intense struggles that so many of us have had just trying to feed our bodies-- the hopelessness, decades of futile efforts that have left us fatter than when we started, knowing we are getting sicker and sicker--whether we are over eating or under eating, the impact on our bodies have been the same.

     

    I am realizing, in all my lifetime of trying to control my weight and be healthy, the following idea has never really come together for me:  Eat as much healthy food as satisfies me but only three times a day--and leave everything else alone.

     

    I've certainly tried eating all I want of anything I want at any time of day or night--result:  fatter and fatter, sicker and sicker, exhausted.  I've tried severely restricting food to those foods that are "diet" foods (ie. lettuce and diet soda)--result:  thinner but sicker and sicker, less and less muscle tone, exhausted and then regain plus another five.  

     

    I've never once, that I can remember, been free of the scale or free of the obsessional worry of where my weight is at any minute of the day or night.

     

    What I know for sure is that the more I obsess over how much I eat and how much I lose or gain the sicker I get and the less weight my body will want to give up.  The mind controls the hormones and the cortisol.  All the self imposed stress is killing me.    

     

    I've been hanging out here for about six weeks now.  I've been leery of jumping into another "food plan" with rules and various restrictions.  I've been leery of eating so much meat and fat.  I been leery of trying another best-selling "Diet Breakthrough!"  However, when you step back from it, it is just kind of old fashioned common sense.  Three meals a day--protein, veggies, fat and carbs.  Maybe I can just relax and quit fussing about it all and go live my life without all this struggle around feeding myself.  Maybe I can just eat this sensible diet with lots of sensible choices and not worry about what I am not eating. Maybe I can allow a little bit of hunger before the next meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can allow a little bit of being full after a meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can just stop freaking out altogether and give myself the gift of time and relaxation around food.

     

    Yea, lets give it a shot. Why not try something completely new and radical!--the eat and not freak out approach!  
  16. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeGA"gardener" in W30 and "morbid obesity"   
    I've just read this entire strand beginning to end, and I find myself emotional, the intense struggles that so many of us have had just trying to feed our bodies-- the hopelessness, decades of futile efforts that have left us fatter than when we started, knowing we are getting sicker and sicker--whether we are over eating or under eating, the impact on our bodies have been the same.

     

    I am realizing, in all my lifetime of trying to control my weight and be healthy, the following idea has never really come together for me:  Eat as much healthy food as satisfies me but only three times a day--and leave everything else alone.

     

    I've certainly tried eating all I want of anything I want at any time of day or night--result:  fatter and fatter, sicker and sicker, exhausted.  I've tried severely restricting food to those foods that are "diet" foods (ie. lettuce and diet soda)--result:  thinner but sicker and sicker, less and less muscle tone, exhausted and then regain plus another five.  

     

    I've never once, that I can remember, been free of the scale or free of the obsessional worry of where my weight is at any minute of the day or night.

     

    What I know for sure is that the more I obsess over how much I eat and how much I lose or gain the sicker I get and the less weight my body will want to give up.  The mind controls the hormones and the cortisol.  All the self imposed stress is killing me.    

     

    I've been hanging out here for about six weeks now.  I've been leery of jumping into another "food plan" with rules and various restrictions.  I've been leery of eating so much meat and fat.  I been leery of trying another best-selling "Diet Breakthrough!"  However, when you step back from it, it is just kind of old fashioned common sense.  Three meals a day--protein, veggies, fat and carbs.  Maybe I can just relax and quit fussing about it all and go live my life without all this struggle around feeding myself.  Maybe I can just eat this sensible diet with lots of sensible choices and not worry about what I am not eating. Maybe I can allow a little bit of hunger before the next meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can allow a little bit of being full after a meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can just stop freaking out altogether and give myself the gift of time and relaxation around food.

     

    Yea, lets give it a shot. Why not try something completely new and radical!--the eat and not freak out approach!  
  17. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeGA"gardener" in W30 and "morbid obesity"   
    I've just read this entire strand beginning to end, and I find myself emotional, the intense struggles that so many of us have had just trying to feed our bodies-- the hopelessness, decades of futile efforts that have left us fatter than when we started, knowing we are getting sicker and sicker--whether we are over eating or under eating, the impact on our bodies have been the same.

     

    I am realizing, in all my lifetime of trying to control my weight and be healthy, the following idea has never really come together for me:  Eat as much healthy food as satisfies me but only three times a day--and leave everything else alone.

     

    I've certainly tried eating all I want of anything I want at any time of day or night--result:  fatter and fatter, sicker and sicker, exhausted.  I've tried severely restricting food to those foods that are "diet" foods (ie. lettuce and diet soda)--result:  thinner but sicker and sicker, less and less muscle tone, exhausted and then regain plus another five.  

     

    I've never once, that I can remember, been free of the scale or free of the obsessional worry of where my weight is at any minute of the day or night.

     

    What I know for sure is that the more I obsess over how much I eat and how much I lose or gain the sicker I get and the less weight my body will want to give up.  The mind controls the hormones and the cortisol.  All the self imposed stress is killing me.    

     

    I've been hanging out here for about six weeks now.  I've been leery of jumping into another "food plan" with rules and various restrictions.  I've been leery of eating so much meat and fat.  I been leery of trying another best-selling "Diet Breakthrough!"  However, when you step back from it, it is just kind of old fashioned common sense.  Three meals a day--protein, veggies, fat and carbs.  Maybe I can just relax and quit fussing about it all and go live my life without all this struggle around feeding myself.  Maybe I can just eat this sensible diet with lots of sensible choices and not worry about what I am not eating. Maybe I can allow a little bit of hunger before the next meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can allow a little bit of being full after a meal and not freak out.  Maybe I can just stop freaking out altogether and give myself the gift of time and relaxation around food.

     

    Yea, lets give it a shot. Why not try something completely new and radical!--the eat and not freak out approach!  
  18. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from JulieH in Older women following Whole30   
    Well, I lost another half pound.  Really.  I'm shocked, that is 5 pounds in 7 days.  I"m eating a LOT of food, 150 gms of carbs yesterday, including potatoes and a banana.  I am not undereating, 2000 calories.  Not exercising other than a walk yesterday.  Feel great.  Wow, I am fast becoming a true believer.  I have been so messed up with trying to figure out what to eat and how much to eat of what kinds of foods.  I've got Interstitial cystitis along with pelvic pain issues and I've had almost no symptoms.  Like I said, I'm shocked.  
     
    Amys, you wrote this above and it really touched me,
     
    Last, we ask you to consider that women have been sold a lie. Particularly as we continue on through life and count the years in a series of decades rather than as a series of seasons, we women need sturdy, strong bodies with a healthy layer of (hang on I'm gonna say it) fat. I'm not suggesting that we aim to be larger than our bodies want us to be; I am instead saying that there is no one on the planet who looks like women are told we need to look (even the models who show us those looks are photoshopped)
     
    I agree so much.  I am most happy being a sturdy size 16, not happy outgrowing my size 18s, feeling sluggish and low energy, which is where this last year of dieting has left me.  
    (sorry for going on so much here, but like I said, I'm in shock.)
  19. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeadowLily in Fasting   
    I"ve had almost the exact same experience as AuntJane, but for me, it wasn't "Intermittent Fasting" it was just decades of not bothering to pack a lunch or thinking that it was smart to keep all the calories available for the evening when I knew I was going to be eating all evening anyway.  My health issues are much like hers, more and more severe allergy symptoms over the years, very painful vulvodynia and interstitial cystitis sparked by food triggers.  And it never kept my weight down anyway, I probably ate twice the calories in the evenings than I ever would have if I had been well fueled during the day.  Add to that, a very high carb diet based on the "low fat" myth that we were all sold, and I think it is lucky I am as healthy as I am.  Blah, so many serious mistakes over the years!
  20. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeadowLily in Fasting   
    I"ve had almost the exact same experience as AuntJane, but for me, it wasn't "Intermittent Fasting" it was just decades of not bothering to pack a lunch or thinking that it was smart to keep all the calories available for the evening when I knew I was going to be eating all evening anyway.  My health issues are much like hers, more and more severe allergy symptoms over the years, very painful vulvodynia and interstitial cystitis sparked by food triggers.  And it never kept my weight down anyway, I probably ate twice the calories in the evenings than I ever would have if I had been well fueled during the day.  Add to that, a very high carb diet based on the "low fat" myth that we were all sold, and I think it is lucky I am as healthy as I am.  Blah, so many serious mistakes over the years!
  21. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeadowLily in Fasting   
    I"ve had almost the exact same experience as AuntJane, but for me, it wasn't "Intermittent Fasting" it was just decades of not bothering to pack a lunch or thinking that it was smart to keep all the calories available for the evening when I knew I was going to be eating all evening anyway.  My health issues are much like hers, more and more severe allergy symptoms over the years, very painful vulvodynia and interstitial cystitis sparked by food triggers.  And it never kept my weight down anyway, I probably ate twice the calories in the evenings than I ever would have if I had been well fueled during the day.  Add to that, a very high carb diet based on the "low fat" myth that we were all sold, and I think it is lucky I am as healthy as I am.  Blah, so many serious mistakes over the years!
  22. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from MeadowLily in Fasting   
    I"ve had almost the exact same experience as AuntJane, but for me, it wasn't "Intermittent Fasting" it was just decades of not bothering to pack a lunch or thinking that it was smart to keep all the calories available for the evening when I knew I was going to be eating all evening anyway.  My health issues are much like hers, more and more severe allergy symptoms over the years, very painful vulvodynia and interstitial cystitis sparked by food triggers.  And it never kept my weight down anyway, I probably ate twice the calories in the evenings than I ever would have if I had been well fueled during the day.  Add to that, a very high carb diet based on the "low fat" myth that we were all sold, and I think it is lucky I am as healthy as I am.  Blah, so many serious mistakes over the years!
  23. Like
    annc3333 reacted to AuntJane in Fasting   
    MeadowLily's post is spot on.  I have been intermittent fasting for several years now - maybe seven?  I can't remember when I started.  I have always been a dieter and struggled with binge eating, and when I learned about Fast Five (where you only eat during a five hour window, between 5pm-10pm), it sounded perfect for me.  And in fact, I liked it.  It didn't take long to get used to and my grocery bill was quite small!  And it allowed me to indulge (read: binge on chocolate and ice cream) on the weekends and still maintain a low weight.  I thought I was so smart for adapting this way of eating.
     
    My periods became erratic in 2010 and stopped in 2012.  I probably should have been concerned, but I was actually elated.  I don't need to explain why, do I??  Now I am struggling with mysterious health issues that nine doctors could not help me with - multiple chemical sensitivity, scores of allergies (something I had never had prior to last year), swelling above my eyes, and days when I can't get out of bed.  A few weeks ago my new doctor ran some diagnostic tests and said he doesn't know how I am still functioning.  My cortisol, hormone, and thyroid levels are all low, and he thinks I have adrenal fatigue and an autoimmune disease.  I will not get better unless I start eating during the day, and he says the fasting is at least partly to blame for my health issues (my pre-Whole30 diet consisting primarily of Lean Cuisine and diet Coke didn't help either).  I am so used to not eating during the day that I don't WANT to.  What started out as a weight maintenance plan has become a horrible disaster.  I wish I had never started.  I would rather be fat again. 
     
    I know this is all based on my experience, but I would not recommend fasting for women on a regular basis.  Days when you eat less?  That probably would be good for everyone.  But don't intentionally put your body in a situation where it thinks you are starving. 
  24. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from Tonibme in Older women following Whole30   
    I'm 59 and would love to know how older women do on this plan.  For me as well, not measuring portions, and eating so much more fat makes me anxious.  I am not willing to go a month only to find that I've gained another five pounds or something.  So after a week, I weighed and found I am down about 4.5 pounds or so. I am shocked.  Since I plan my meals for the day on Myfitpal, I know I've been eating about 1700 to 2300 calories which is a lot for me.  However, about half those calories are from fat, coconut milk especially, and none of them are from sugar or grains or simple carbs.
     
     I'm finding it a very easy plan to stay on, a treat even, as I usually don't eat sweet potatoes or white potatoes or all that fat.  Before Whole 30 I had been not been eating big meals, but lots of little bits of meals/treat/snacks which had me eating pretty much all day and evening.  There was very little time between infusions of sugar/carbs and I think I never let my body use up what was already in my blood stream before adding more.  My gas tank was perpetually overflowing.   Now that I am eating bigger meals but only three times a day maybe my body is dealing with the calories better--that's the only thing I can think of as to why I might have lost so much so quickly.  Last summer I spent three months eating about 1200 a day, walking twice a day and barely lost 9 pounds.  It was incredibly demoralizing and I just will not put myself through that again.  I even think about being that hungry again and I feel overwhelmed and victimized.  So, for me the Whole 30 seems like a diet of riches, I am fine without the sugar if I can eat some other carbs or fruit now and again.
     
    We'll see, even if I don't lose another pound I'll be ahead of where I was on my 1200 calorie diet!  
  25. Like
    annc3333 got a reaction from ericaa in A Startling Realisation   
    To me, with my diet history, 5 days on and then going "off road" has been the story of my life.  For me, there is about a 0% chance that I can just get back to a sugar free diet after two days without major withdrawal and mental cravings.  Sometimes it takes me six months, sometimes a year to really get back to a calm and easy place in my eating once I get too much sugar in me.  I think there are those that don't have a long history of deprivation followed by binges (or minibinges) that could do the weekend off thing, but for those of us with decades of dieting and failure, the eat well for a few days followed by eating poorly for a couple days (or months or years) has been the source of great frustration and failure.  The Whole 30 plan is making more and more sense to me as a potential way out from this very demoralizing pattern.