adabeie

Members
  • Content Count

    44
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    adabeie got a reaction from Raven in Plan a Whole30 dream vacation   
    A trip I'm looking to put together sometime in the next two years is a big extreme.. I want to ride my bike home (to California, unless Europe distracts me).. from Korea. It's been done, and it's my kind of lovely: camping, physical exertion, exotic foods, and lots of time by myself. Probably also photography and journaling. 
     
    I really have no idea how I'd do this, since even on shorter biking trips, processed foods tend to be a regular feature. 
     
    Ideally I'd love to cook for myself, though depending on the gear you need to cook things, you have to weigh the costs of the extra weight on the bike, and while weight itself isn't necessarily a deal breaker (touring bikes can handles quite a load), space is often at a premium and you can't exactly take a hand blender.
     
    I imagine I'd try to keep it simple, and buy basic and pre-cooked ingredients along the way, and make the most of street food when in more populated areas. I do imagine I would have a basic mess kit and a camping stove, I consider the ability to create fire an essential, as much as being able to source clean water no matter the locale. 
     
    For sake of flexibility though, if you get an invitation to dinner or to camp in someone's yard, one tends to be hungry rather than picky when it comes to food and your body becomes an absolute furnace in terms of burning through food at times like this. Still, I wonder how complaint I would be able to stay, and certainly there are vast stretches of Central Asia that have excellent vegetarian and meat based cuisines.
     
    So far, for me, avoiding soy has been the hardest. (I'm kinda in one of the soy Meccas here in Seoul.)
     
    But it's something to ponder, and something to try out on shorter trips first. I would love to hear about others who've gone the road less traveled with their Whole30/9 philosophy and were able to stick it through. 
  2. Like
    adabeie got a reaction from ladyshanny in Will grains wreck a fat-conditioned metabolism?   
    I appreciate all the replies. I have reincorporated certain grains to what is so far an overall good effect; eg, breakfast is a bowl of oats with at least a portion of coconut milk and with some spices and such it provides reliable fuel for 5-6 hours (meaning I don't feel hunger until that 6th hour, and when it comes it's a stomach feeling rather than a mood swing), which is about how long I need it to until my work schedule permits a meal break.
     
    I've been doing two daily meals for so long that trying three a day was a pattern I simply couldn't establish in the end, that was actually the hardest part of the W30 for me. There are definitely more animal proteins and vegetables in my current diet than pre-W30, and less dairy. Certain things my body missed, like milk kefir. My digestion was actually quite good pre-W30 and during, it was all over the place despite following all the proper guidelines. Go figure. 
     
    The stabilized blood sugar has remained, which was my chief concern, and my energy levels are rising again, allowing me to get back to the workout routines I had had pre-W30 (that fell apart for a lot of personal reasons I won't get into here). More meat in my diet is probably one of the biggest effects of doing the W30, ironically - most of my home cooked meals previously were ovo/lacto-vegetarian, though not intentionally, my wife just hates handling meat and our schedules were so up and down we'd end up buying a steak or chicken and forget about it until the day after it expired. (We both cooked, we just would handle different meals, and dinners were her passion when she had sufficient time, which hasn't been in a long while.)
     
    Anyway I'm taking the reincorporation bit by bit and paying a lot more attention to how my body reacts to certain foods, and staying away from things that act like crack. The sugar dragon is a funny thing that the whole 'wait 5 minutes, if you still want it., it's not a craving' notion has been good for, and frankly sweets.. kinda gross me out. I'd rather have a straight espresso. 
     
    Thanks for the replies and input. I'll definitely be following up on any further replies. 
  3. Like
    adabeie got a reaction from ladyshanny in Will grains wreck a fat-conditioned metabolism?   
    I appreciate all the replies. I have reincorporated certain grains to what is so far an overall good effect; eg, breakfast is a bowl of oats with at least a portion of coconut milk and with some spices and such it provides reliable fuel for 5-6 hours (meaning I don't feel hunger until that 6th hour, and when it comes it's a stomach feeling rather than a mood swing), which is about how long I need it to until my work schedule permits a meal break.
     
    I've been doing two daily meals for so long that trying three a day was a pattern I simply couldn't establish in the end, that was actually the hardest part of the W30 for me. There are definitely more animal proteins and vegetables in my current diet than pre-W30, and less dairy. Certain things my body missed, like milk kefir. My digestion was actually quite good pre-W30 and during, it was all over the place despite following all the proper guidelines. Go figure. 
     
    The stabilized blood sugar has remained, which was my chief concern, and my energy levels are rising again, allowing me to get back to the workout routines I had had pre-W30 (that fell apart for a lot of personal reasons I won't get into here). More meat in my diet is probably one of the biggest effects of doing the W30, ironically - most of my home cooked meals previously were ovo/lacto-vegetarian, though not intentionally, my wife just hates handling meat and our schedules were so up and down we'd end up buying a steak or chicken and forget about it until the day after it expired. (We both cooked, we just would handle different meals, and dinners were her passion when she had sufficient time, which hasn't been in a long while.)
     
    Anyway I'm taking the reincorporation bit by bit and paying a lot more attention to how my body reacts to certain foods, and staying away from things that act like crack. The sugar dragon is a funny thing that the whole 'wait 5 minutes, if you still want it., it's not a craving' notion has been good for, and frankly sweets.. kinda gross me out. I'd rather have a straight espresso. 
     
    Thanks for the replies and input. I'll definitely be following up on any further replies. 
  4. Like
    adabeie reacted to kirkor in How many eggs is too many eggs?   
  5. Like
    adabeie reacted to kirkor in How many eggs is too many eggs?   
  6. Like
    adabeie reacted to Munkers in How many eggs is too many eggs?   
     
    That's more or less my take on it. Also, even for those people who do respond to eggs, a reduction only slightly impacts their serum cholesterol.
     
    Eggs are a nutritional powerhouse AND they're relatively cheap and easy to get. In my book, unless there's a compelling reason to avoid them (like allergies or autoimmune issues), then folks should eat them. I don't think the research supports cholesterol as a compelling reason to exclude them. I'm a lot more convinced about the roles of sugar and refined carbohydrates in the elevation of cholesterol. You know the ones I'm talking about--"heart healthy whole grains" and "it comes from corn and your body can't tell the difference because sugar is sugar!"
  7. Like
    adabeie reacted to Zyriel in How many eggs is too many eggs?   

  8. Like
    adabeie reacted to Jen G in How many eggs is too many eggs?   
    Thanks for all the egg advice. I don't eat red meat of any kind, so I am relying on eggs a lot for my protein source. I'm currently on Day 15. Was also wondering about if I'm eating too many eggs, cholesterol, etc. They don't seem to be having any negative digestive effects on me, nor am I getting sick of them. So glad to hear it's ok to keep eating them! : ) P.S. sweet potato hash browns, with fresh baby sauteed spinach, topped with fried eggs is my breakfast almost every day. I actually wake up looking forward to it! And hard boiled eggs on top of my salad at lunch too.
  9. Like
    adabeie reacted to howswelegant in What does it take to lose fat-burning status?   
    I'm really not asking permission for a certain quantity. I'm just curious...the science presented in ISWF makes sense. I just want to know what the flip side is. To me, it's part of a complete picture, understanding how it all works. No secret agenda
  10. Like
    adabeie reacted to Munkers in Fat Adapted   
    Those are the things I look for in myself. The type of hunger that I experience also varies. In sugar mode, I need food NOW. My head hurts, I'm tired, I feel shaky, and I'm ready to murder someone. When I'm fat adapted, I may still experience intense hunger, but I'm still functional and I know I'll be okay until I can get some food in me.
  11. Like
    adabeie got a reaction from jeanbean in Guidelines for kombucha sugar content? (homebrewed)   
    I wanted to extend this thread in terms of home-brewed kombucha - varying aspects of fermentation will result in different curves of sugar consumption by the scoby, so I was curious about what the criteria were in judging the absence of sugar from a given kombucha might be? I'm starting a new batch since I began the W30 (day 8 now) and I've been trying to find any experience of home-made kombucha among those doing the W30. It's constantly fermenting, until the point where the pH puts the culture into stasis, but it essentially keeps going as long as there's sugar to be digested, even in 'raw' (eg, no sugar added post-fermentation as a sweetening agent, but unpasteurized, and thus still fermenting and therefore consuming available sugars) kombucha.
     
    I guess I might be worrying too much about whether there's a sufficient amount of sugar in the final product to trigger something. I do drink rather dry kombucha, always have, stuff that tends towards a slightly vinegary flavor rather than the soda-pop flavor of some brands/varieties...
     
    Anyone out there on the W30 who have done this themselves (ie brewed rather than bought, and yes, I've been all up and through the Cultured Food Life blog, but I don't think I'm about to go out and get a brix meter..)?
     
    My overall guidelines for previous batches have largely depended on time and temperature: I find at roughly 22-25C it takes 5-8 days to get a sufficiently dry batch to my taste, which tends to be on the dry side of the general spectrum.
     
    As far as tripping up old habits and psychological impact, I have always had a sweet tooth but mostly for pastries.. in a given year I can count on one hand the number of cans of soda I might drink, so I'm not too worried about feeding the sugar demons, but I also just wanted to get a sense of others' experience drinking kombucha. It's such a fabulous beverage and so versatile with herbal blending.. rosemary and lemongrass are personal favorites for infusions, along with rose, though lavender often reminds me too much of soap.. 
  12. Like
    adabeie reacted to Munkers in How many eggs is too many eggs?   
    Here's an article from the Journal of Nutrition. Of note:
     
    "Furthermore, evidence has been presented showing that the current blanket recommendations regarding dietary cholesterol and egg intake are unwarranted for the majority of people and are not supported by scientific data."
     
    "First, a conservative estimate suggests that only 30% of the population would respond to dietary cholesterol. It has been determined that a reduction in dietary cholesterol of 100 mg/d would only slightly decrease plasma total cholesterol levels of those who are responsive. For example, if a responsive individual chose to eat two eggs in one day they would exceed the AHA recommended upper limit for cholesterol intake by 126 mg, which would suggest that they may experience a 0.05–0.07 mmol/L increase in plasma total cholesterol levels. However, as previously mentioned, persons who consume more than one egg a day do not have a greater relative risk for CHD than those who eat only one egg a week."
     
    "The reality of the situation is that although egg intake has steadily declined since the original recommendations in the 1970s, CHD is still the leading cause of death in the U.S. today. Clearly, the current guidelines are not benefiting the public as a whole and may actually have negative nutritional implications."
     
    Hopefully that's  mainstream enough for your mom.
  13. Like
    adabeie reacted to ladyshanny in Will grains wreck a fat-conditioned metabolism?   
    The only way I can think of "testing" fat adaptation is to do your thing for a period of time and then remove those grains and go back to a Whole30 template and see if you get the wicked headache and the "I'll just sleep here on the corner of this sidewalk while waiting for the light to change" kind of tired. Those would be indications then that your body became somewhat reliant on the grains/higher carbs over burning fat. This does not seem like a good or particularly efficient way of testing.
    You might also want to read up on brown vs white rice on Mark's Daily Apple (on ipad, posting links is a pain, just google). Brown rice, although marketed as the "healthy" version, still contains its bran and that bran is where the problems can be. White rice, providing you can tolerate any rice, is more benign.
  14. Like
    adabeie reacted to ShannonM816 in Will grains wreck a fat-conditioned metabolism?   
    Unfortunately, there's no way we can say how exactly how grains will affect any particular person. You'll have to try it and see for yourself. What's really happening isn't that your body only burns fat, it just becomes better at using fat, which is a more difficult fuel for it to process than carbs -- it actually uses both. So, assuming you don't have any other negative reactions to rice, there is probably some amount of rice or other grains you can eat and not lose that fat adaptedness, but figuring out what amount that is will take some experimentation on your part.
     
    Keep in mind that the reason grains, including rice, are left out of Whole30 are not just because of their carb content or how they affect fat adaptedness. There's a little bit about the reasons in this article, and It Starts With Food goes into more depth. Obviously, you can decide what you want to include in your normal diet after a Whole30, but pay attention to how you feel over time, even if you don't have immediate noticeable reactions -- you may find that if you include rice often, you just don't feel as good anymore.
  15. Like
    adabeie reacted to kirkor in How many eggs is too many eggs?   
    @adabeie
    http://chriskresser.com/the-diet-heart-myth-cholesterol-and-saturated-fat-are-not-the-enemy/
    http://authoritynutrition.com/modern-nutrition-policy-lies-bad-science/
    http://michaelpollan.com/interviews/michael-pollan-debunks-food-myths/
  16. Like
    adabeie reacted to ladyshanny in Fatty proteins vs lean proteins - eggs?   
    Allia, what people are saying that? There seems to be a general trend in your dialogues where you ask for advice for yourself and then become very concerned with what other people are going to be doing or what advice other people have been given.
     
    For YOU, in YOUR context of needing to at least maintain weight if not gain some, you need to eat at the high end of the template and add additional fats to every meal that you make.  This may not be precisely the advise we give someone who has weight to lose and that advise may not be precisely the advise we give a pregnant or nursing woman or a person with an autoimmune condition or a person with any other unique-to-them circumstance.
     
    The advice you have been given by these brilliant moderators was specifically written for you and takes into consideration the circumstances and situations that you have outlined as your backstory.  It's for no one else and doesn't necessarily apply to other people.  You do you.  
  17. Like
    adabeie reacted to abbyn in How many eggs is too many eggs?   
    I seem to have the opposite problem of many people on here: I love (and can tolerate!) eggs. They're cheap, filling and practically convenience food. Now that I've finally mastered mayonnaise, I'm so happy I can make egg salad and deviled eggs. 
    I typically eat 3 fried eggs for breakfast on a bed of spinach, sometimes with sweet potato hash browns. Now I'm starting to eat egg salad for lunch as well (with mini bell peppers and 1/2 an avocado, as yesterday's lunch went)...  Is there any reason why I can't eat eggs as my protein for 2 meals of the day? 
     
  18. Like
    adabeie got a reaction from fmr_sailor in Outside Online topic: comparative meals   
     
    I was really hoping W30 would make the author's list, since it's been in the news a bit more lately and, to my mind, seems more stably established than some of the other diets (again, it's a bit weird to call it a diet except in the sense of 'diet' meaning 'what you consume' rather than 'temporary fix to a long term problem')..
     
    I think the one thing that stuck out in my mind was a) a firm inclusion of grain based carbs for the author, and a wariness of some of the fats and protein sources that I've used in the W30, ie eggs, that I do wonder about being linked to elevated cholesterol. But I'd need routine bloodwork about that, and frankly, I feel great on the W30, and going off of it during this vacation has emphasized that more. (I did take a stand and am including far more vegetables in every meal.. I'd apparently completely misjudged the health of my family's eating habits, which I had recalled being far more wholesome than they are in practice)..
     
    But indeed - I feel like a "W30 for athletes" would have likely annihilated any of the author's concerns.. I wonder if there's a dietary shootout to be organized here. Wouldn't that be interesting? 
     
    And yes, the friend who turned me on to the W30 is lending me her copies, both, of It Starts With Food and the other one.. I'd love to buy my own, and actually.. being temporarily in the US might be a good chance to do that and avoid the 200% premium Korean bookstores stack onto imported books, especially best sellers..
     
    Thank you for your input. At least I don't feel paralyzed by the plethora of information out there. 
  19. Like
    adabeie reacted to ShannonM816 in Outside Online topic: comparative meals   
    I'll admit up front, I've only skimmed the article, I didn't read the whole thing in depth, but I can tell you that what he describes as the paleo diet is NOT Whole30. Whole30 started with a basic Paleo framework, but the Hartwigs have chosen to focus on what makes you most healthy, regardless of whether our ancestors ever ate it. If the author of the article had been doing a Whole30 and came here saying he was hungry all the time, we'd have told him to eat more. We'd have told him to eat starchy vegetables, at least a serving a day, probably more based on his activity level. We'd say raw vegetables are all right, but would have encouraged him to have them cooked if he preferred them that way, and would certainly have encouraged him to have them cooked if he were experiencing any kind of digestive issues, as raw vegetables often exacerbate those. We would never, regardless of how much he exercised, have said eat a granola bar. What he's reviewing is not really reflective of Whole30. I can't really speak to whether it's really representative of Paleo, because there are a bunch of different ways of eating out there that have been labeled Paleo. 
     
    I will say that his conclusion -- "Eat lean protein, good fats, and healthy carbs" -- sounds very much like Whole30, although it doesn't necessarily specify lean for the protein, and it assumes your healthy carbs will come from vegetables and fruit, not grains. His recommendation to do an elimination diet and see how different foods affect you when you reintroduce them is exactly what Whole30 is designed to do. 
     
    If you're interested in the science behind why the Whole30 rules are what they are, I'd highly recommend reading It Starts With Food if you haven't already.
     
    If you're concerned about cholesterol, you might want to read through this previous discussion -- there are a lot of links there that you may find helpful.
  20. Like
    adabeie reacted to MeadowLily in Outside Online topic: comparative meals   
    “Genetics loads the gun, but environment pulls the trigger.” 
    ― Melissa Hartwig, It Starts with Food: Discover the Whole30 and Change Your Life in Unexpected Ways
  21. Like
    adabeie reacted to MeadowLily in Outside Online topic: comparative meals   
    “what is at the root of lifestyle-related diseases and conditions like heart disease and stroke? Take one guess. Systemic inflammation.” 
    ― Melissa Hartwig, It Starts with Food: Discover the Whole30 and Change Your Life in Unexpected Ways
  22. Like
    adabeie reacted to MeadowLily in Outside Online topic: comparative meals   
    “But one thing is certain—in the case of nutrition and health, the science can be confusing and can lead to “paralysis by analysis” (a state in which you take no action because you’re not sure what to do).” 
    ― Melissa Hartwig, It Starts with Food: Discover the Whole30 and Change Your Life in Unexpected Ways
  23. Like
    adabeie got a reaction from ladyshanny in Worries about weight fluctuations/body composition RE: satiety, proper meal portions   
    So I stepped on the scale a few days ago, day 34 or something, it was (I finished around this time last week!) and everyone was right: I'd held steady from that time. And my energy levels built slowly. And instead of a 'tiger blood' period, I just felt.. more stable. So I started running again, and biking a bit more, and doing a kickboxing maintenance routine I have written down somewhere from my old coach. 
     
    It's hard to know how to take the expectation of feeling "great", since what I feel is more of what I'd less emphatically call, "good". I guess you could liken it to feverish passionate love for someone vs calm, comfortable, emotionally stable love. If I had to put my body state in that kind of comparison, it's more of the latter. I don't feel like I'm bursting with energy, but I can say to myself, let's go do 10k. And I run it, and I feel solid, steady while doing it, and last week I even PR'd at a sub 50 minute 10k, which is a first for me, and frankly I haven't been much of a runner lately. And so far the re-additions are holding steady: occasional soy, a much smaller amount of dairy, and while I haven't gone into wheat yet, steelcut oats and granola have come back nicely with the milk kefir I fermented and stored before I started this whole thing. (I'll probably have to get a new culture, I doubt it survived my first attempt and cold storing kefir grains for which you need powered milk.)
     
    But just checking back in with this. I feel lighter on my feet, I feel much more stable. The absence of hypoglycemia has made a huge difference in my emotional ups and downs, and probably my perceived energy levels as well. My skin seems clearer, and overall I'm eating more veggies, more fish, and cooking everything at home, which is more cost effective and I feel good about it. 
     
    So, good work, W30, good work, me, and good work, all of you out there trying it for the first time, or keeping with it for months or years. 
  24. Like
    adabeie got a reaction from ladyshanny in Worries about weight fluctuations/body composition RE: satiety, proper meal portions   
    So I stepped on the scale a few days ago, day 34 or something, it was (I finished around this time last week!) and everyone was right: I'd held steady from that time. And my energy levels built slowly. And instead of a 'tiger blood' period, I just felt.. more stable. So I started running again, and biking a bit more, and doing a kickboxing maintenance routine I have written down somewhere from my old coach. 
     
    It's hard to know how to take the expectation of feeling "great", since what I feel is more of what I'd less emphatically call, "good". I guess you could liken it to feverish passionate love for someone vs calm, comfortable, emotionally stable love. If I had to put my body state in that kind of comparison, it's more of the latter. I don't feel like I'm bursting with energy, but I can say to myself, let's go do 10k. And I run it, and I feel solid, steady while doing it, and last week I even PR'd at a sub 50 minute 10k, which is a first for me, and frankly I haven't been much of a runner lately. And so far the re-additions are holding steady: occasional soy, a much smaller amount of dairy, and while I haven't gone into wheat yet, steelcut oats and granola have come back nicely with the milk kefir I fermented and stored before I started this whole thing. (I'll probably have to get a new culture, I doubt it survived my first attempt and cold storing kefir grains for which you need powered milk.)
     
    But just checking back in with this. I feel lighter on my feet, I feel much more stable. The absence of hypoglycemia has made a huge difference in my emotional ups and downs, and probably my perceived energy levels as well. My skin seems clearer, and overall I'm eating more veggies, more fish, and cooking everything at home, which is more cost effective and I feel good about it. 
     
    So, good work, W30, good work, me, and good work, all of you out there trying it for the first time, or keeping with it for months or years. 
  25. Like
    adabeie got a reaction from ladyshanny in Worries about weight fluctuations/body composition RE: satiety, proper meal portions   
    So I stepped on the scale a few days ago, day 34 or something, it was (I finished around this time last week!) and everyone was right: I'd held steady from that time. And my energy levels built slowly. And instead of a 'tiger blood' period, I just felt.. more stable. So I started running again, and biking a bit more, and doing a kickboxing maintenance routine I have written down somewhere from my old coach. 
     
    It's hard to know how to take the expectation of feeling "great", since what I feel is more of what I'd less emphatically call, "good". I guess you could liken it to feverish passionate love for someone vs calm, comfortable, emotionally stable love. If I had to put my body state in that kind of comparison, it's more of the latter. I don't feel like I'm bursting with energy, but I can say to myself, let's go do 10k. And I run it, and I feel solid, steady while doing it, and last week I even PR'd at a sub 50 minute 10k, which is a first for me, and frankly I haven't been much of a runner lately. And so far the re-additions are holding steady: occasional soy, a much smaller amount of dairy, and while I haven't gone into wheat yet, steelcut oats and granola have come back nicely with the milk kefir I fermented and stored before I started this whole thing. (I'll probably have to get a new culture, I doubt it survived my first attempt and cold storing kefir grains for which you need powered milk.)
     
    But just checking back in with this. I feel lighter on my feet, I feel much more stable. The absence of hypoglycemia has made a huge difference in my emotional ups and downs, and probably my perceived energy levels as well. My skin seems clearer, and overall I'm eating more veggies, more fish, and cooking everything at home, which is more cost effective and I feel good about it. 
     
    So, good work, W30, good work, me, and good work, all of you out there trying it for the first time, or keeping with it for months or years.