slc_melissa

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  1. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from Ksprljan in Lenten Whole30 2/14-4/1   
    You can eat anything for breakfast. Leftovers. Soups. Salads. Anything you’d eat for any other meal.
  2. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from JohnW in Help please --- Work trip   
    I'd stay away from the Nut based bars and go for the meat-based one, myself.  (I like original Chomps and Epic bars.)  I feel like the nut and sugar based ones are setting you up to be super hungry really quickly.  I'm also a big fan of baby food packets for vegetables on the go.  There are plenty that are just sweet potatoes, or sweet potatoes and beets, for instance.  I've cooked and frozen full sweet potatoes, put those in an insulated bag, and taken, say, hard boiled eggs and other foods to keep them cold, then replenish insulated bag with ice at the hotel.  You'd have to look for the beef jerky, but there are plenty of options out there.
  3. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from purplepadres in Advice on planning for long commute and long work meeting   
    You’re allowed to leave the room, yeah? Go be weird purse food lady out of sight. I find that fats keep me satiated longer, so I am thinking olives. Maybe some coconut. I like chomps and epic bars as portable protein. For portable veggies, I like baby food pouches of sweet potato or whatever. (Bonus-in a hurry, you can really suck down baby food pouches quickly!)
    however, in my experience people actually notice it more if you’re obviously picky about provided food vs just eating your own food, but each situation is different.
  4. Thanks
    slc_melissa got a reaction from audie in Can I have more food? Should I have less food?   
    Eating fat and protein will give you energy and balance out your hormones and keep you satiated. It's like magic.
    What veggies do you like? Eat those for breakfast.
    Personally, I like cooked, leftover roasted vegetables for my breakfast with eggs I cook in the morning.  Raw veggies are not my favorite and don't keep me full as long. I especially like green beans , asparagus, and sweet potatoes or butternut squash that have been roasted with olive oil, salt, and pepper. I prefer leftovers as a time saver.
    I also like a bowl of chili for breakfast.
  5. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from jmcbn in Calorie intake   
    Can you list out a few days of what you're eating?  1200 is actually really low for any adult.....and if your hormones aren't sorted out yet, you might not be getting correct satiety signals.  Are you following the template?  
    https://whole30.com/downloads/whole30-meal-planning.pdf
    Hunk of protein, tons (2-3 cups) of vegetables, thwack of fat.  (On the fats on the template, choose 1-2 per meal, not all fats at every meal.)
  6. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from AnitaC in Starting over   
    Fiber=vegetables. Eat 2-3 cups of vegetables at every meal. Everything you need is on the website or forum, especially https://whole30.com/pdf-downloads/
    The books are great, but its all here for free anyway. 
    I’ve done multiple whole 30s without coconut aminos, bought sauces (except salsa), almond flour, or ghee. I’ve never purchased a date in my entire life and probably couldn’t identify one anyway.
    i keep most meals easy combinations of foods, and I always keep frozen vegetables on hand. Plenty of breakfasts are 3 eggs cooked fresh and a bag of frozen vegetables cooked in the microwave.
    chicken in a crockpot cover with canned tomatoes or made/purchased salsa. Shreds easy, goes on a lot of things.
    make a load of meatballs (ground meat+spices), bake at 375 F for 25-30 min. On the other tray in your oven, roast vegetables like green beans, asparagus, or potatoes at the same time.
    you should not be constantly hungry on the whole30. If you’re genuinely hungry, eat something! Preferably a meal composed of fat, protein, and veggies.
  7. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from jmcbn in Starting over   
    Since you mentioned macros in an earlier post, whole30 is not a macro counting/ calorie counting program and it's not really recommended. The goal is to figure out what works for your body and not try to shoehorn it into some other set of parameters.
  8. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from AnitaC in Starting over   
    Fiber=vegetables. Eat 2-3 cups of vegetables at every meal. Everything you need is on the website or forum, especially https://whole30.com/pdf-downloads/
    The books are great, but its all here for free anyway. 
    I’ve done multiple whole 30s without coconut aminos, bought sauces (except salsa), almond flour, or ghee. I’ve never purchased a date in my entire life and probably couldn’t identify one anyway.
    i keep most meals easy combinations of foods, and I always keep frozen vegetables on hand. Plenty of breakfasts are 3 eggs cooked fresh and a bag of frozen vegetables cooked in the microwave.
    chicken in a crockpot cover with canned tomatoes or made/purchased salsa. Shreds easy, goes on a lot of things.
    make a load of meatballs (ground meat+spices), bake at 375 F for 25-30 min. On the other tray in your oven, roast vegetables like green beans, asparagus, or potatoes at the same time.
    you should not be constantly hungry on the whole30. If you’re genuinely hungry, eat something! Preferably a meal composed of fat, protein, and veggies.
  9. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from ladyshanny in Coffee and Turkey   
    The vinegar in this case could also just be plain white vinegar.  But, labeling requires listing out the sub ingredients of something as well, so if it wasn't OK, it should say something like: Ingredients.....sea salt, vinegar(sugar,sulfites), ....
  10. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from jmcbn in Paleo Flatbread?   
    Unfortunately the app was probably created by someone trying to cash in on the Whole30 brand and is in no way associated with the program.  Buyer beware with some of the recipe books out there as well.  The best app is to learn to read labels and then you'll always have what you need in your head!
  11. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from purplepadres in Rural area....   
    I've also never bought any fancy sauces or dates, they are not necessary at all.  (And I have easy access to them.)  I like looking at recipes for ideas, but I usually just put food on a plate like lady shanny.
    For fats, it sounds you only like butter, so you probably need to make your own ghee.  If you don't have cheesecloth to strain, use coffee filters.  If you don't have those, just carefully pour off the liquid and leave the solids behind. (You'll lose a little bit of ghee by leaving it in the pan this way, but that's OK.)
    I think it'd be worth trying a "light" or "extra-light" olive oil.  How much oil did you use and at what temperature were your roasting vegetables?  (I'd try, say, potatoes first.  Asparagus or green beans.)  Just enough olive oil to coat, salt and pepper to taste, roast somewhere between 350-400 for 20-35 min.  (Lower end for asparagus, upper end for potatoes.)  I cook a lot with olive oil and have never had to fish my food out of it, so I'm wondering if you're possibly putting on too much? 
    Do you live in the type of rural area that has some local farms?  One of them might have tallow or other animal based cooking fats you can try.
    You can make your own marinara sauce: Saute some onions and mushrooms, add a can of tomato paste and a can of diced tomatoes, add italian-ish spices like basil, thyme, oregano, parsley, etc. (and salt and pepper).
    And now that you have that - put a cup of the marinara over chicken and bake until done.  Or add the chicken directly into the sauce and let it simmer until done.
    Lady shanny is right that crockpots usually need some liquid - but not necessarily a "sauce."  A lot of vegetables release a fair bit of liquid, so that also works.  Onions+carrots+beef roast dry rubbed with some spices can make plenty of liquid on its own.  One of the easiest roasts I've ever done was a pork roast with a can of crushed pineapple on it.
    How about a batch of chili?  Extremely flexible depending on what is available as far as type of meats and types of vegetables.
    Also, don't fall into the idea of breakfast foods being one thing and lunches/dinners being another.  Breakfasts can be anything, not just eggs.  Good luck.
     
  12. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from purplepadres in Rural area....   
    I've also never bought any fancy sauces or dates, they are not necessary at all.  (And I have easy access to them.)  I like looking at recipes for ideas, but I usually just put food on a plate like lady shanny.
    For fats, it sounds you only like butter, so you probably need to make your own ghee.  If you don't have cheesecloth to strain, use coffee filters.  If you don't have those, just carefully pour off the liquid and leave the solids behind. (You'll lose a little bit of ghee by leaving it in the pan this way, but that's OK.)
    I think it'd be worth trying a "light" or "extra-light" olive oil.  How much oil did you use and at what temperature were your roasting vegetables?  (I'd try, say, potatoes first.  Asparagus or green beans.)  Just enough olive oil to coat, salt and pepper to taste, roast somewhere between 350-400 for 20-35 min.  (Lower end for asparagus, upper end for potatoes.)  I cook a lot with olive oil and have never had to fish my food out of it, so I'm wondering if you're possibly putting on too much? 
    Do you live in the type of rural area that has some local farms?  One of them might have tallow or other animal based cooking fats you can try.
    You can make your own marinara sauce: Saute some onions and mushrooms, add a can of tomato paste and a can of diced tomatoes, add italian-ish spices like basil, thyme, oregano, parsley, etc. (and salt and pepper).
    And now that you have that - put a cup of the marinara over chicken and bake until done.  Or add the chicken directly into the sauce and let it simmer until done.
    Lady shanny is right that crockpots usually need some liquid - but not necessarily a "sauce."  A lot of vegetables release a fair bit of liquid, so that also works.  Onions+carrots+beef roast dry rubbed with some spices can make plenty of liquid on its own.  One of the easiest roasts I've ever done was a pork roast with a can of crushed pineapple on it.
    How about a batch of chili?  Extremely flexible depending on what is available as far as type of meats and types of vegetables.
    Also, don't fall into the idea of breakfast foods being one thing and lunches/dinners being another.  Breakfasts can be anything, not just eggs.  Good luck.
     
  13. Thanks
    slc_melissa got a reaction from Sugar free barista in Meal interval   
    I'd try to swap in some, say denser carbs like sweet potatoes, instead of the fruit in your mini-meals. I often take baby food pouches hiking with me for quick, portable sweet potatoes.
  14. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from AnitaC in Lack of Appetite and Dizziness later in Whole30   
    If you tell us the info regarding your food intake that sugarcube requested above, we might be able to help.are you salting your food? Getting other electrolytes?
  15. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Why Not Organic/Grass Fed?   
    There are also plenty of, say, local farms that have great produce/meats that are raised in fantastic conditions in a sustainable way, possibly even organically, but are not USDA Organic certified.  The way I understand it, the organic certification is pretty pricey and carries certain requirements that may not be realistic for smaller farms.  
  16. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Why Not Organic/Grass Fed?   
    There are also plenty of, say, local farms that have great produce/meats that are raised in fantastic conditions in a sustainable way, possibly even organically, but are not USDA Organic certified.  The way I understand it, the organic certification is pretty pricey and carries certain requirements that may not be realistic for smaller farms.  
  17. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from purplepadres in Deli meat slip-up   
    Also, if you're eating a lot of nuts, nut butters, and larabars....that can contribute massively to bloating and low energy.
  18. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from RandiW in Beyond Bloated   
    Fats: handful of olives, olive oil, coconut, coconut milk, coconut butter, ghee, fattier cuts of meat or fish, sauces like mayo, chimichurri, cauliflower "hummus", pesto without cheese, dump ranch, etc.
    https://whole30.com/2016/10/best-of-dips-sauces/
    https://whole30.com/2014/08/mayo-ghee-sauces/
    It's incredibly hard to overdo fats.
    Pre workout is ideally fat and protein, hardboiled egg is ok, just drop the fruit entirely.
  19. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from lauramichele in Whole 30 & Vyvance (for ADHD/Anxiety)   
    Nuts can also be really hard on the digestive system, they are recommended at a closed handful (or equivalent) every other day at most. I don't have anything to ad about the meds, but nuts jumped out from your meal descriptions.
  20. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from purplepadres in About to start and need help planning my mornings   
    Ideally any meal has all three of protein, fat, veggie. Sometimes it doesn’t work out. Maybe a mini-meal has a meatball&sauce = protein and fat (2). Maybe it’s meatball & carrots = protein and veggie (2). Since fruit is not recommended as not being part of a complete meal, it has no place in these scenarios. Apple&almond butter= sugar hit keeping cravings going. Also, in general, nuts are recommended as a closed handful every other day at most, as a fat source they can be hard on the digestive system and don’t have great omega ratios. Look at the template and scale down for a mini-meal.  But do try to eat something in the morning, it’ll help sort hormones out.
  21. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from purplepadres in About to start and need help planning my mornings   
    Rx bars and the like are for emergencies only.
    what foods do you personally consider “lighter”? Eat some of those. Maybe some pre made salmon cakes? Soup? And not being hungry in the morning can be a sign of whacked out hormones, so you might need to power through on some of it. If you need a mini-meal at your mid morning break, eat one! Just make sure it contains fat, protein, and veggies. (Like, just apples and almond butter is not ideal.)
    if you’re workouts aren’t super intense, then no you don’t necessarily need a post workout meal.
  22. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from kirkor in Substitution for canned sweet potatoes   
    The "Farmer's Market" brand of Organic Sweet Potato Puree is just sweet potatoes every time I've seen it (check your labels).  I've found it at Sprouts Market and at Harmon's (local UT chain).  Usually on the bottom shelf of the canned vegetable section, sometimes near the canned pumpkin stuff for pies, or randomly at side aisles of Sprouts.  The brand also has pumpkin and butternut squash puree.  They have it on thrive market if you're OK with online ordering. 
  23. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Ingredients   
    We need to know the full ingredients list to help you out.
  24. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Potatoes   
    Here's a fb post with some of the reasoning: https://m.facebook.com/Whole30/posts/671357376274517
    Or https://whole30.com/2014/07/new-whole30/
    But everyone gets to make choices based on their own personal experiences/goals. Potatoes might not be appropriate for sedentary or metabolically challenged folks. If you don't want to eat them, that's fine. roasted potatoes as part of a meal with other veggies, protein, and fat affect the body differently than chips eaten as a snack as far as the glycemic response to a meal.
  25. Like
    slc_melissa got a reaction from SugarcubeOD in Potatoes   
    Here's a fb post with some of the reasoning: https://m.facebook.com/Whole30/posts/671357376274517
    Or https://whole30.com/2014/07/new-whole30/
    But everyone gets to make choices based on their own personal experiences/goals. Potatoes might not be appropriate for sedentary or metabolically challenged folks. If you don't want to eat them, that's fine. roasted potatoes as part of a meal with other veggies, protein, and fat affect the body differently than chips eaten as a snack as far as the glycemic response to a meal.