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Found 16 results

  1. Does anyone else leave potatoes out of their whole30? I know they are technically compliant, but for me I find that they are absolutely food with no brakes. I did my first and second whole30s a couple years ago, back in the BP Era (before potato), and I've found that adding them back in severely cramps my progress. I never did like sweet potatoes, and to this day can't stand to eat them, but white potatoes... game over. If I need carbs, I rely on squash instead. I'm not trying to make this into a Whole30: Hard Mode, but I seem to do better without potatoes in the mix. Curious if this is the case for anyone else.
  2. white potatoes

    Just rechecking. Potatoes were not included on the original Whole 30 and so there are lots of recipes for cauliflower mashed, etc. Now they're on - and I love them. What's the reason they were included and are there guidelines?
  3. I'm on Day 24 and loving this. Eating lots of sweet potatoes, winter squash and white potatoes. Since white potatoes were recently added (don't know when) - is it possible to over eat these? They've been on my "no" list for so many years...... Noticing that I don't miss rice, or quinoa or even noodles. The potatoes - cut in wedges - serve as great "pushers" for my meals. Keep me so satisfied Thanks for your help
  4. Anyone aware of a compliant pre-packaged frozen shredded hash brown? I have a great omelette recipe that I used pre-Whole 30 with hash browns and smoked salmon, but everything I find has dextrose in it (Ore-Ida, Giant Eagle, etc.). I would super prefer not to break out the knuckle-grater!
  5. Potatoes?

    I have seen on pinterst that I cannot eat potatoes on whole30, but I have also seen sone recipes with potatoes and say they are whole30 approved. Can someone please enlighten me on this delema?
  6. I was in a bad place when I started the Whole 30. It was 8 months after giving birth to my second child. I was still 22 lbs overweight despite working out several times a week and choosing “healthy” foods (not much meat, lots of grains and beans). I ate zero packaged junk food, but I had delicious high quality pastries a couple times a week and thought nothing of it. Oh, and I regularly had 2-3 glasses of wine per night just to “wind down.” My childhood asthma had returned. My skin was on a hormonal rollercoaster; besides breakouts I had eczema and keratosis pilaris (chicken skin bumps on back of my arms). I was always hungry and always eating. I tried calorie counting. I tried Weight Watchers when the calorie counting got demoralizing. I tried weighing all my food when WW didn’t work. All that micromanaging sucked the joy out of living, and I still couldn’t lose the weight. My mantra was that I deserved that pastry/glass of wine/bowl of tortilla chips because I had been “so good” all day. I’d pile on the calories after the kids were in bed. But then I simply turned a corner, and decided that I deserved to feel healthy, to feel like I did before my pregnancy. Heck, why not feel even better than that? So I decided to give W30 a try. What did I have to lose? Which begs the question, 30 days later, what did I lose? As it turns out I lost ZERO pounds. 30 days of total compliance, and I weigh exactly the same. Yep, I’m one of those. (At this moment in time, while nursing, anyway.) I gave myself an hour or so to feel really down about it. But then I took at the NSVs I drafted yesterday before I weighed in. I weigh the same, but I’m not the same. I GAINED: - the ability to breathe freely without asthma. This is truly priceless. I have not touched my inhalers in one month. - a peaceful relationship with food. I’m not battling it any longer. I know what makes me feel good. And once I finish the reintros I’ll know what doesn’t! - knowledge and acceptance. I know my body is holding on to this weight because it needs it for nursing. Sure, I can tweak things here or there, but by and large I’ve proved to myself that it just doesn’t want to let go of it right now. I’m going to have to be patient. I am ready to stop nursing for a variety of reasons, but it may take a while for my hormones to catch up. So, what next? I’m going to do reintroductions to see which food group(s) were exacerbating the asthma. I'll have the occasional glass of wine over the next week or so (we’re traveling). I also had bloodwork done on Day 25. In two weeks I will meet with my chiropractor who has nutritional training to review that. Perhaps there are hormonal factors at play that can be worked on. Once I know the bloodwork results, I’ll decide whether to jump into another Whole30. For now, I will stay compliant while at home, avoid whatever it is that’s causing the asthma even when out, and have the occasional glass of wine. But mostly, I am going to enjoy the calm Whole30 has brought to my life and give my body some grace. Read on for details if you’d like. As always, I’m open to any feedback on how to move forward. These forums were an amazing resource through the whole process. NSVs: - Asthma GONE without the use of steroid inhalers - Skin clearer - Nails growing like crazy - Eczema gone - Keratosis pilaris (chicken skin on arms) drastically reduced - On the rare occasions where my alarm goes off before the kids are up, I only press snooze once instead of three or four times - I can see my waist again! hallelujah! - Clothes fit better and I can get into some I couldn’t a month ago - Even energy all day long - More time between meals means more efficient work - Free from cravings. I no longer struggle with food choices. - Not tempted to eat after dinner - I don’t “need” wine to relax anymore - I don’t need to weigh myself every day as I used to What went well: - I rocked it with the homemade condiments: mayo, ketchup, ranch dip and Nom Nom Paleo’s “magic mushroom” seasoning were my favorites - Egg bakes saved my bacon for breakfast - such a time saver, and great to start the day without having to “think” about the meal - Kombucha was the perfect treat instead of wine/beer/cocktails - I made it through Easter with flying colors - I cooked many compliant meals for my extended family (we’re talking large groups of 12-20 people, and they all loved them) - I did NOT evangelize to my family, which is something I’d done in the past, but tried to set a quiet example What could have gone better: - I ate more frequently and had more fruit and potatoes than necessary in the beginning. I was still breastfeeding heavily then (I’m down to one nursing session a day now), so I was nervous about my supply and likely overdid it. All compliant, so no harm done, but once I got down to 3 (large, by my previous standards) meals per day, which was about two weeks in, I felt much better. - Some days I ate 1/2 an avocado at every meal. Maybe I need to dial that back to 1/3. - Still having some skin breakouts but then again I’m in a transitional place hormonally as I slowly stop breastfeeding - Sleep is not a long or solid as I would like, mostly due to kids waking me up - if fact, SLEEP could be the largest factor in the weight hanging on. - I need to drink more water. 62 oz/day isn’t cutting it. What I’ll do in the future, to keep doing better: - Make fruit and potatoes a once a day thing, not an every meal thing - Aim to be in bed by 8 and asleep by 9 - Read for 1hr before bed instead of watching tv - Dial coffee back to one cup per day, replace second cup with matcha - Aim to drink 3 32-oz bottle of water/day - Keep working with my preschooler on not waking us at night when he goes to the bathroom in the middle of the night. He can do it, but it helps when we prep him by talking about it before bedtime. - Let my husband take over the 5:30 feedings when he is home so I can sleep longer - Take measurements to track inches lost, not just weight - Stay on whole 30 at home. I rarely eat out (maybe once a week) so that would be a pretty complaint lifestyle, and I find it easy to do at home. - I won’t go back to having stevia in my coffee. That was the hardest thing to give up, and I think it was triggering a cycle of sugar cravings. In fact I may even give up my almond milk. I think I’m ready to enjoy coffee black, and I like the simplicity of that.
  7. Potatoes/RSS Yes or no?

    I have been using thisprotocol for a year now with much success but recently fell during the holidays. A friend chalenged me to try Whole30. So here is my question with the potatoes. Why are they no good on Paleo and Primal but "ok" on WH30? Excerpted from Marksdailyapple.com What Is Resistant Starch? When you think about “starch,” what comes to mind? Glucose. Carbs. Elevated blood sugar. Insulin spikes. Glycogen repletion. Basically, we think about starch that we (meaning our host cells) can digest, absorb, and metabolize as glucose (for better or worse). Officially, resistant starch is “the sum of starch and products of starch degradation not absorbed in the small intestine of healthy individuals.” Instead of being cleaved in twain by our enzymes and absorbed as glucose, resistant starch (RS) travels unscathed through the small intestine into the colon, where colonic gut flora metabolize it into short chain fatty acids. Thus, it’s resistant to digestion by the host. There are four types of resistant starch:RS Type 1 – Starch bound by indigestible plant cell walls; found in beans, grains, and seeds. RS Type 2 – Starch that is intrinsically indigestible in the raw state due to its high amylose content; found in potatoes, bananas, plantains, type 2 RS becomes accessible upon heating. RS Type 3 – Retrograded starch; when some starches have been cooked, cooling them (fridge or freezer) changes the structure and makes it more resistant to digestion; found in cooked and cooled potatoes, grains, and beans. RS Type 4 – Industrial resistant starch; type 4 RS doesn’t occur naturally and has been chemically modified; commonly found in “hi-maize resistant starch.” It’s almost certain that different RS types have somewhat different effects on our gut flora, but the specifics have yet to be fully elucidated. In general, RS (of any type) acts fairly similarly across the various types. Where Do We Get It?We can get RS from food. The richest food sources are raw potatoes, green bananas, plantains, cooked-and-cooled potatoes, cooked-and-cooled-rice, parboiled rice, and cooked-and-cooled legumes. We can get RS from supplementary isolated starch sources. The best sources are raw potato starch, plantain flour, green banana flour, and cassava/tapioca starch. Raw (not sprouted) mung beans are a good source of RS, so mung bean starch (commonly available in Asian grocers) will probably work, too. The most reliable way to get lots of RS, fast, is with raw potato starch. There are about 8 grams of RS in a tablespoon of the most popular brand: Bob’s Red Mill Unmodified Potato Starch. It’s also available at Whole Foods. For an exhaustive compendium of RS sources, check out this PDF from Free the Animal. What Does It Do for Us?Like any other organism, gut bacteria require sustenance. They need to eat, and certain food sources are better than others. In essence, RS is top-shelf food for your gut bugs. That’s the basic – and most important – function of RS. What Are the Health Benefits of Consuming RS? What does the research say?Preferentially feeds “good” bacteria responsible for butyrate production. It even promotes greater butyrate production than other prebiotics. Since the resident gut flora produce the butyrate, and everyone has different levels of the different flora, the degree of butyrate production varies according to the individual, but resistant starch consistently results in lots of butyrate across nearly every subject who consumes it. Butyrate is crucial because it’s the prime energy source of our colonic cells (almost as if they’re designed for steady exposure to butyrate!), and it may be responsible for most of the other RS-related benefits. Improves insulin sensitivity. Sure enough, it improves insulin sensitivity, even in people with metabolic syndrome. Improves the integrity and function of the gut. Resistant starch basically increases colonic hypertrophy, making it more robust and improving its functionality. It also inhibits endotoxin from getting into circulation and reduces leaky gut, which could have positive ramifications on allergies and autoimmune conditions. Lowers the blood glucose response to food. One reason some people avoid even minimal amounts of carbohydrate is the blood glucose response; theirs is too high. Resistant starch lowers the postprandial blood glucose spike. This reduction may also extend to subsequent meals. Reduces fasting blood sugar. This is one of the most commonly mentioned benefits of RS, and the research seems to back it up. Increases satiety. In a recent human study, a large dose of resistant starch increased satiety and decreased subsequent food intake. May preferentially bind to and expel “bad” bacteria. This is only preliminary, but there’s evidence that resistant starch may actually treat small intestinal bacterial overgrowth by “flushing” the pathogenic bacteria out in the feces. It’s also been found to be an effective treatment for cholera when added to the rehydration formula given to patients; the cholera bacteria attach themselves to the RS granules almost immediately for expulsion. Enhances magnesium absorption. Probably because it improves gut function and integrity, resistant starch increases dietary magnesium absorption. What do user anecdotes say?Improves body composition. I’ve heard reports of lowered body fat and increased lean mass after supplementing with or increasing dietary intake of RS. Seeing as how RS consumption promotes increased fat oxidation after meals, this appears to be possible or even likely. Improves thyroid function. Many RS supplementers have noted increases in body temperature, a rough indicator of thyroid function. Improves sleep, conferring the ability to hold and direct (in real time) private viewings of vivid movie-esque dreams throughout the night. I’ve noticed this too and suspect it has something to do with increased GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) from the increased butyrate. Another possibility is that resistant starch is feeding serotonin-producing gut bacteria, and the serotonin is being converted to melatonin when darkness falls. Increases mental calm. Many people report feeling very “zen” after increasing RS intake, with reductions in anxiety and perceived stress. The latest science indicates that our gut flora can impact our brain, and specific probiotics are being explored as anti-anxiety agents, so these reports may very well have some merit. Are There Any Downsides?For all the success stories, the message boards are also rife with negative reactions to RS. They take it, maybe too much to start, and get gas, bloating, cramping, diarrhea or constipation, a sense of “blockage,” headaches, and even heartburn. I think RS supplementation may be a good measuring stick for the health of your gut. Folks with good gut function tend to respond positively, while people with compromised guts respond poorly. The gas, bloating, cramps and everything else are indicators that your gut needs work. But it’s not the “fault” of resistant starch, per se. What to do if you’re one of the unlucky ones? You’ve got a few options:You could skip it altogether. I think this is unwise, personally, because the role of fermentable fibers, including RS, in the evolution of the human gut biome/immune system has been monumental and frankly irreplaceable. There’s a lot of potential there and we’d be remiss to ignore it. You could incorporate probiotics. You need the guys that eat the RS to get the benefits of consuming RS. And sure, you have gut flora – we all do, for the most part, except after colonic sterilization before a colonoscopy or a massive round of antibiotics, maybe – but you don’t have the right kinds. Probiotics, especially the soil-based ones (the kind we’d be exposed to if we worked outside, got our hands dirty, and generally lived a human existence closer to that of our ancient ancestors), really seem to mesh well with resistant starch. You should reduce the dose. Some people can jump in with a full 20-30 grams of RS and have no issues. Others need to ramp things up more gradually. Start with a teaspoon of your refined RS source, or even half a teaspoon, and get acclimated to that before you increase the dose. You could eat your RS in food form. Potato starch and other supplementary forms of RS are great because they’re easy and reliable, but it’s also a fairly novel way to consume RS. You might be better off eating half a green banana instead of a tablespoon of potato starch. My ExperienceThe first time I tried potato starch, I got a lot of gas. Not the end of the world, and I realize gas is a natural product of fermentation, just unpleasant. It died down after a few days, but it was only after I added in some of my Primal Flora probiotic that I started seeing the oft-cited benefits: better sleep, vivid dreams, a more “even keel.” Now, I do potato starch intermittently. I’m very suspicious of eating anything on a daily basis. I tend to cycle foods, supplements, exercises, everything. Gas production goes up every time I re-start the potato starch, but not unpleasantly so and it subsides relatively quickly, especially when I take the probiotics. So there’s a learning curve to RS. It’s not a cure all, but neither is anything else. It’s merely an important, arguably necessary piece of a very large, very complex puzzle. Resistant starch is vitally important for gut (and thus overall) health, but it’s not the only thing we need. It’s likely that other forms of fermentable fiber (prebiotics) act synergistically with RS. Hey, it’s almost like eating actual food with its broad and varied range of bioactive compounds, polyphenols, fibers, resistant starches, vitamins, and minerals tends to have the best effects on our gut biome! You can certainly enhance the picture with isolated refined resistant starches and fibers like unmodified potato starch, but they can’t replace what our bodies really expect: the food. Let me know what you think, and I hope you find this guide useful. What’s your experience been with resistant starch? Good, bad, neutral? Let’s hear all about it! Read more: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-definitive-guide-to-resistant-starch/#ixzz3yPMH6kIH
  8. So on my first Whole30 my mind was super sharp and I had TONS of energy along with building a lot of muscle. Then I did another Whole30 and was SUPER excited white potatoes were added . Well I ate them almost every day with meals and didn't get nearly the same effect. I know only losing 3lbs was because of the white potatoes but I would atleast expect my mind to be just as sharp as on my first Whole30. Could I possibly have an allergy or intolerance to something in white potatoes? Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  9. I am on Day 6 and really struggling with potatoes. I just think I've had too many since starting and am going to start limiting them. (they aren't helping my digestive system either) My biggest problem with them is eating them post workout. I'm almost at the point of not being able to stomach any more sweet potatoes, white potatoes are close behind. Plus if I haven't cooked up any in advance I'm searching for something else in a hurry. I usually have lots of hard-boiled eggs so I eat a whole one Pre and only egg white Post. Any other post workout carbs that work for you? How about bananas? I really miss my protein shakes with oats!! Thanks!
  10. Hi, I'm a newbie only on day 4. I have a few questions: One is how many potatoes (sweet and white) should we have weekly? Same question with fruit. Can I have some daily with my meal? How many meals? After reading several posts where people are having sweet potato fries/chips, snacks, smoothies, and fruit several times a day, I'm confused! I thought we ate 3 meals period, and were not supposed to eat snacks unless working out more than 20 minutes, and not eat things like fries/chips with our meals. I like only a very few veggies so adding potatoes or fruit to at least a meal a day really sounds great to me. I'm guessing my husband should be eating a lot more than me as he goes through this? So how many eggs is too many for breakfast or whenever? Thanks!!!
  11. All I have in the kitchen is 1 lb ground chicken, a bag of red potatoes, & two avocados.....also a few cherry tomatoes, cilantro, and a little kale. Can I make a meal out of this?
  12. New Rules?!

    I accidentally, and I believe completely by chance, learned that there are new rules to W30! All potatoes are compliant. I looked back at the shopping list and did not see white potatoes listed. I know it is not an exhaustive list, but had GFChris not seen a comment I posted to someone about potatoes, I would have never known the news. Also, when learning about the new approval on all potatoes, salt came into the discussion as "now" being compliant. But salt was compliant before. So I fear that I am somehow out of the loop. I'm not on Facebook,Twitter or any other social media. Is that where the latest news travels? Am I missing other important updates? Please advise. I'd greatly appreciate it. I'm a rule follower & want to keep up to date and keep doing W30 properly. Thanks!
  13. This is my first whole30 and I'm only on day 4 however my runs haven't been easy the last 4 days after reading a few posts I realized many people recommended starchy veggies such as sweet potatoes. So I'm thinking of adding potatoes to dinner but can I eat it with the skin? I love the skin but can't remember where I once read that the skin isn't healthy and should be removed before eating the potato. So for those who eat white/ or sweet potatoes during your whole30 do you peel the skin or keep it? And is it a rule to not eat the skin or it's fine to eat it? Thanks in advance!
  14. I found some deli turkey breast at Whole Foods that might be compliant now that white potatoes are, but before buying it I'd like to check. Brand: Fresh Fields Provisions Item: Hickory Smoked Turkey Breast Ingredients: Turkey, water, contains 2% or less native potato starch, sea salt, natural smoke What sayeth the wise men and women of the board?
  15. whoa. white potatoes are APPROVED?

    I am on Day 6 of my first whole 30...and I see a link on here that white potatoes have been added to the official allowed foods list. Did i hallucinate this? Is this true? And if so......why am I so scared to eat them? Can someone just say, "yes Holli you can safely eat a white potato tonight and it will be whole 30 compliant" so that I will feel better??
  16. Hey everyone- red potatoes and sweet potatoes are ok- but what about purple potatoes? I'm asking on behalf of my mother in law, a fellow whole30-er. I just stayed away from anything but red or sweet and didnt question it, but she is quite curious about the purple. Also, if one was to cook something in brandy- with the brandy being cooked down so the alcohol is cooked out, would it still be whole30 compliant? Also asking on behalf of my MIL, as I'm under the impression that because of the sugars in brandy (which I don't believe "cook out") it would make whatever she's cooking in it non-compliant. ??? Thank you all in advance!