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Wordlvr

Whole 30 for an unathlete

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I just started Whole 30 last Thursday though I've been Paleoesque for a few months. I'm starting this having lost 17 pounds over the last four months and have many more to lose. For now I'm pretty darned good with the food. My interest in Whole 30 is about increasing energy, lowering creeping blood sugar, losing a considerable amount of weight and making sleep apnea a thing of the past -- just for starters. I tend to sequence big changes when I make them so am thinking about adding exercise to my Whole 30 now that my food feels secure.

It seemed like a good thing to ask athletes and the athletically inclined how you might suggest I do that starting from zero. Current props: No health club, have some three pound weights around, have an excellent rebounder available and a dog. I bought (and have read about half so far) It Starts With Food, have read tons else about food and now want to turn my attention to Whole 30 movement. Any suggestions? Thank you.

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Walking is a good place to start. Walk your dog. Work you way up to a mile or two per day and you'll have done yourself a lot of good.

It sounds all wrong, but the book Convict Conditioning could be useful to you. The premise of the book is that people in prison need to be strong, but don't have any equipment and so must exercise with their body weight alone. The book gives instruction for doing 6 different exercises - pushups, leg raises, pullups, squats, bridges, and handstand pushups. The cool thing is that it offers 10 levels of doing each exercise. Most people can do the first level of three or four of the exercises and could soon do the first level of all six. Then you can progress as far as you want or can through the levels.

Pushups are a good example. The first level is doing pushups against a wall so you don't have to actually move a lot of weight. Then as you make progress, you move to the second level - incline pushups. You might do incline pushups on the stairs of your house. The third level is kneeling pushups, the fourth half pushups, and the fifth full pushups. For what it is worth, the tenth level is one arm pushups.

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I figured I'd get some excellent input about things I knew not. You've suggested some intriguing things to try in what is a foreign language right now. Great book title, too. Thanks!

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Hi Wordlvr! I've lost 165lbs in the last 20 months. When I first started I was over 300lbs and I was afraid of getting injured working out my size. After I lost about 30lbs I started working out at Curves (30 minute circuit workout). Eventually I got a bike and got outside a couple of times a week. I then took some fun classes like hula hooping to keep things interested. My goal was to keep things simple and fun. I added kettlebell workouts and eventually joined a gym where I began working with a trainer and lifting. For me my goal is to become fit and establish a lifestyle that I can maintain. I encourage you to start working out at a pace you can maintain for a bit and evaluate where you are regularly. Don't be afraid to try something new. If you can't do something or just don't like it, that's ok. Try something new. Being active is something you're going to want to continue even after losing the weight. Now is a good time to find things you're going to love doing even when you've reached your goal weight. Challenge yourself regularly. There's nothing more exciting than finding out you can do something that you've never been able to do before. Most of all have fun and know that it does take time. The smallest of changes done consistently can lead to amazing results. I feel like i'm proof of that everyday. One of my favorite quotes right now is, "The habit of persistence is the habit of victory." Herbert Kauffman. 17lbs is a great start. Looking forward to hearing all of your accomplishments to come!

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Keep it simple, fun and repeatable. As Tom suggested - dog walking would be a great place to start. Aim to go 5 mins longer each time. Build in extra walking or activity into everyday life, take the stairs instead of the lift etc.

I believe the best results come when we focus on 1 objective at a time (if training is not already part of your life) - eg focus on getting through the Whole 30, make it feel comfortable and then step into a focused training program as your next objective. Think of it as 1 bird with 2 stones - you'll definitely get the outcome!

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I've gone between sedentary and very active more times than I'd like to admit, due to illness and depression. For me, walking is the first thing I do when getting back into active mode. This time around I plan to get into yoga again eventually.

It also depends on your personality. I like a combination of walking, weight training, and yoga or pilates. But I definitely always start with walking. Hope this helps.

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First to apriln0414 -- Your post had me in tears. You've had a remarkable journey and anyone who has tried to lose weight, even the same 15 pounds over and over, knows how hard this is. Just looking at the statistics of how rarely people do this lets you know. I'm humbled by how you've changed your life and your health. It's great to read your enthusiastic words regarding excitement about mastery and your commitment to challenge yourself. Thanks for responding with your story and for your generous encouragement. It's inspirational and offers me hope, much needed at the beginning of an unknown journey. I look forward to knowing all that unfolds for you.

Luke (who must be British as per using the word "lift" rather than elevator) and Adagio -- I love hearing others' ideas about approaching exercise...something to which I do not naturally gravitate. I secretly do love one thing: dancing, any kind, from ballroom to salsa to folk dancing. I like to swim, too, but it can be high maintenance and you have to belong to something to use a pool. I love the idea of hula hooping. Adding five minutes everyday to my walk is a great idea.

Thanks so much.

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