What to do when you hate sweet potatoes...


RedHead

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This is my first post, but I have been following this forum for a long time now and am very grateful for al the answers it has given me so far.

I am on day 22 of my 1st whole30 (yay!) and apart from my period being on for 8 days straight now and 12 days early I am doing great and loving it.

 

So here is my problem: starchy vegetables!

Sweet potatoes give me the creeps. I really tried it: Mashed, hashbrowned, fried, casseroled, baked...

No way I will get that stuff down. (Believe this might have to do with my period problems, too)

 

I have to say that I am German and sweet potatoes are not common here at all!  They are quite expensive, too, and I could name lots of people who have never ate one in their life. But even when I lived in the US I didn't care for them at all.

 

Next problem: Carrots, as soon as cooked, cause digestive problems. Also Pumpkins: I only get those in whole (means nothing canned or pickled available in this country) which leads to the fact that it is a sunday-I-need-to-have-time-to-cook-meal for me not a go-to one.

 

Any suggestions what I can eat instead?

 

Thanks so much for your thoughts!

 

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The only way I can do carrots a little is raw, that is why they are mosly my post-WO veggie. But I have to watch closely.

 

I should thy the other veggies you named, not familiar with cooking those. Up for a experiment as soon as I have enough time to try.

e.g. I actually discovered that I do like brussel sprouts after years of refusing them, so why not beetroot. ;-)

 

Think I will try the to prepare some pumpkin, too. I love pumpkin soup.

I must say that my refrigerator ist about 1/3rd the size of a typical American one. I have neough room to store enogh food for max. 4-5 days and I have no freezer :-(

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I really dislike the taste of sweet potato as well. It's way too sweet for my Nordic tastebuds, so I can understand you very well. I have successfully made some sweet potato fries before, and they were quite good once seasoned with some chili powder. Hot and sweet go well together, but otherwise I just can't eat them. Perhaps if you diced them into really small cubes and stir fried them really fast with some meat and make a hash out of them. The longer you cook them, the sweeter they taste.

 

I've made some root vegetables in the oven: carrot, turnip, beetroot, onion, a bit of clarified butter (I'm sure olive oil would be fine as well) and thyme. Here's a photo (I didn't want to post it here, because it was too big).

 

I love raw carrots, even if I'm not a fan of the cooked ones, as they too get very sweet whilst cooked. So I've had a lot of grated (or is it shredded) carrot with my meals. Besides it's good to have a bit of raw veggies as well. I love raw turnips and rutabagas as well, but that's probably a Finnish thing :-) I also love beetroots, but I look like I've murdered someone after preparing them. You should also preferably cook them, as they can contain a lot of nitrates.

 

I think all of them would also be great in soups, either as puréed or as cubes in a chicken or beef soup!

 

EDIT: oh yeah, I forgot, I also had parsnip in those oven veggies. I love parsnip as well :-)

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I love beetroot raw, and roasted - I do them whole, wrapped in foil with a little water, baked til soft. When they're cool enough to handle, peel the skins off (wearing gloves or plastic bags over your hands)

Parsnip chips are yummy, I have also had them puréed.

I have never eaten a turnip! Haha.

Pumpkin steams relatively quickly - just chop it smaller. I also grate it in to omelettes and it cooks quickly that way too.

I'm imagining you have a bar sized fridge, or a bit bigger? English (UK) standard size? I lived there for a while and struggled with the lack of refrigeration!

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Thanks for your ideas!

I will hit the grocery market tonight and see what they have. Good luck it's fall and pumpkin etc. all regional products.

Oven baked root vegetables sounds yummy.

 

Yes, bar sized fridge would be about right. :-D

Definitely too small for whole30 and cooking a lot of stuff in advance, but I figured out a pretty good way. Everytime I have the time to cook fresh, I just drop by the famers market at my corner and buy the nights dinner. That way I at least got around food boredom so far.

 

My Grandmother does (very yummy) old fashioned German cooking a lot and uses turnips instead of potatoes in a special soup she preps.

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I love hearing about what people from other countries are eating or not eating! so interesting. I'm from Texas and LOVE sweet potatoes. I could eat a couple a day...but won't! Rutabagas are great, not quite as strong as turnips and make a great sub for white potatoes. I peel, slice, boil and then add ghee.. yum. This morning after I cooked a couple of pieces of compliant bacon I added some frozen okra to the pan.. had it with my eggs. I would have never done that 30 days ago!

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I love hearing about what people from other countries are eating or not eating! so interesting. I'm from Texas and LOVE sweet potatoes. I could eat a couple a day...but won't! Rutabagas are great, not quite as strong as turnips and make a great sub for white potatoes. I peel, slice, boil and then add ghee.. yum. This morning after I cooked a couple of pieces of compliant bacon I added some frozen okra to the pan.. had it with my eggs. I would have never done that 30 days ago!

 

I have enjoyed this too. Here on the boards, and traveling, it is interesting how foods change so quickly. I have met may people who have never tried grits (don't eat them anymore), greens, iced tea, etc., not to mention the quarks Americans have with condiments based on region. 

 

Anyway, I love sweet potatoes, but have pretty much eliminated them. The carb content just requires too much insulin for me. I am sticking to less starchy vegetables, and that is what is working for me.

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I have enjoyed this too. Here on the boards, and traveling, it is interesting how foods change so quickly. I have met may people who have never tried grits (don't eat them anymore), greens, iced tea, etc., not to mention the quarks Americans have with condiments based on region.

Anyway, I love sweet potatoes, but have pretty much eliminated them. The carb content just requires too much insulin for me. I am sticking to less starchy vegetables, and that is what is working for me.

I don't know what grits are. And I don't know what you guys mean by "Hamburger" and "hash" and "casserole" :P

We have hamburgers - they're the patties in rolls like the things you buy at maccas. Casseroles are like stews with slow cooked meat and vegies.

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And we have scones with jam and cream...I'm sure American scones are different (?)

Jelly doesn't go in sandwiches with peanut butter, jam does!

Faggots...or bassoons :)

Haha, Roz - I got very strange looks when I moved to the uk to study, living in college dorms. A new friend asked what I was wearing to a party that night - my "pants and thongs" response wasn't taken so well!

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I don't think I've ever tasted pumpkin. I have no idea what pumpkin pie would taste or smell like, so I have no emotional response to it. I also can not understand combining peanut butter, jelly and bread :-) Probably because bread here is mostly made with sourdough and is almost never sweet (apart from one exception which I guess had Swedish influence).

I did have an emotional response to the thoughts of turnip though, when I remembered this very traditional recipe. Rye flour is mixed into cooked and mashed turnip and formed into flat breads and baked in the oven on high heat. Eaten hot with butter. Yum :-)

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I don't think I've ever tasted pumpkin. I have no idea what pumpkin pie would taste or smell like, so I have no emotional response to it. I also can not understand combining peanut butter, jelly and bread :-) Probably because bread here is mostly made with sourdough and is almost never sweet (apart from one exception which I guess had Swedish influence).

I did have an emotional response to the thoughts of turnip though, when I remembered this very traditional recipe. Rye flour is mixed into cooked and mashed turnip and formed into flat breads and baked in the oven on high heat. Eaten hot with butter. Yum :-)

We don't "do" pumpkin pie here either - pumpkin is a savoury vegetable to me, not something you have for dessert :)

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OK.. so back to Sweet Potatoes..    how about Sweet Potato PIE!   it must be a Southern American thing..   I think we love to make everything sweet!   Before I started the Whole30 I would bake a sweet potato and then add brown sugar and cinnamon to it!  

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We don't "do" pumpkin pie here either - pumpkin is a savoury vegetable to me, not something you have for dessert :)

This sweet and savory confusion can yield some funny results. I always thought that mince pie was savory. I wanted to try one when in UK and imagine my surprise when I bit into something that was really, really sweet. Like dried plums, but ten gazillion times sweeter! It took me half an hour to finish it as I tried to hide my horror :-) Awkward.

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Oh, biscuits and gravy, had to say goodbye to those over 40 days ago. 

 

Amberino, Google grits just to see what they are. They have pretty much no nutrition, but are very cheap and fill the belly. They began as poor man's food, but became part of our culture. Serve eggs over them for breakfast, then serve shrimp over them for dinner.

 

I laugh when English call us Yankees, since we use the word for our Northerners.

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Oh, biscuits and gravy, had to say goodbye to those over 40 days ago. 

 

Amberino, Google grits just to see what they are. They have pretty much no nutrition, but are very cheap and fill the belly. They began as poor man's food, but became part of our culture. Serve eggs over them for breakfast, then serve shrimp over them for dinner.

 

I laugh when English call us Yankees, since we use the word for our Northerners.

I agree..  Texans or anyone from the South... NEVER want to be referred to as Yankees!  ;)  

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My bad, sorry!

I was wondering, since i've never eaten shrimp & grits, nor even heard of it til recently, would it be SWYPO if i made a paleo version?? Or just international cuisine? :lol:

Roz,   Have you heard of Polenta?   grits are pretty much the same thing.. ground corn!   The only thing I can think of that would come close to mimicking them would be riced cauliflower.. 

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