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gonammer

...Sweet potato starch

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While the ingredient is technically compliant, I would file this under "paleofying poor food choices"

I totally admit that it's a very very very thin line, since zucchini noodles and spaghetti squash are both approved, but I think that because this is a processed food and not just shredded sweet pototoes/zucchini/squash, it crosses the line into non-compliant. To get sweet potato starch, they really stripped out all the other good stuff that's in sweet taters and left you with something noodle like that is JUST empty calories.

So that's my thought process. no-go

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The noodles are actually not sweet potato, nor are they starch. In Japanese, they plant is konyakku, which typically gets anglicized to konjac. The konjac noodles are often referred to as "yam noodles" because they come from a tuber that is similar to a yam, but is actually a different plant (sweet potatoes are not yams, either)

The noodles are processed so that they are essentially all fiber...and here's where the trouble lies. The noodle has been processed in to something that is not at all natural to eat. It can cause some digestive trouble. Konjac has been used many years as a way of making a Japanese candy, sweetened with fruit juice. That same candy has caused some folks in North America to suffocate and die (literally)...as it does not dissolve in the mouth from body heat or saliva, it can only be broken down by chewing force. This is why some EU nations have banned Konjac. Your food shouldn't kill you.

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The Korean version are actually made from real sweet potatoes*, not konjac. It's really confusing because konjac gets called yam, and then that gets mistranslated to sweet potato. If it's a Japanese noodle, it's almost certainly konjac. Korean not. Another way to tell is that the Korean sweet potato noodles typically cook into so-called glass or cellophane noodles. Still NOT real food or W30 food, but less likely to destroy your innards.

*As above after lots of processing.

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Bummer!  I am so sorry these aren't compliant, as I have a bunch of them in my cupboard, and yams are okay.  But oh well.  I don't think they're more processed than wheat noodles, and they are completely different from shirataki/konyaku (which I don't think are gross--they're perfectly fine if you know how to prepare them in the Japanese dishes they're used in.)  I'm starting re-introduction next week.  Maybe I could add these on my non-gluten grain day?  Or would they just be sort of a non-reintroductory item?

 They're delicious in chapchae, a stir fried Korean glass noodle, vegetable, and marinated meat dish.  It's not whole 30 friendly, but something I'm looking forward to making occasionally after I'm done, provided I don't react to soy sauce.

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1 hour ago, tasha99 said:

Bummer!  I am so sorry these aren't compliant, as I have a bunch of them in my cupboard, and yams are okay.  But oh well.  I don't think they're more processed than wheat noodles, and they are completely different from shirataki/konyaku (which I don't think are gross--they're perfectly fine if you know how to prepare them in the Japanese dishes they're used in.)  I'm starting re-introduction next week.  Maybe I could add these on my non-gluten grain day?  Or would they just be sort of a non-reintroductory item?

 They're delicious in chapchae, a stir fried Korean glass noodle, vegetable, and marinated meat dish.  It's not whole 30 friendly, but something I'm looking forward to making occasionally after I'm done, provided I don't react to soy sauce.

You can definitely use them after your whole30.  I"m not sure they need reintroduction unless there's some non compliant ingredient in them or you have a particular psychological attachment to them... 

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