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Vian

Avocado oil for mayo?

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Today at costco they were sampling avocado oil (mixed with balsamic vinegar with bread dipped in it). I asked for just some of the oil and the lady looked at me like I was crazy, but gave me a little oil in one of the paper cups. It was very neutral and kind of tasteless - perfect for mayo. It's 100% avocado oil, but says it has a smoke point of 500 degrees, then lists on the side the smoke points of other oils, including "virgin avocado oil" Does this mean it's been refined and is less healthy than virgin avocado oil?

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If it was neutral tasting, I'd say it had been refined. I think avo oil is quite strong in taste, and hated the mayo I made with it.

I'd say that it's not as good a choice as the virgin avo oil, but not sure about how it would compare to olive oil (not EVOO)

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The first time I made mayo with avocado oil, it was a little green in color, but it had a great flavor. The next time, I used a little light olive oil; it was still good, and less expensive.

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I would say they've probably removed the best stuff from that avocado oil. The website might tell you more, but I'd pass unless it's the only avo you can get, especially if it's expensive. Save your money for a better version.

I use a virgin avocado oil sometimes for mayo, it's a crazy bright green oil AND it makes brilliant green kermit-ish mayo (NOT a usual mayo colour - suspect kids might be afraid of it, or love it lol), but I like the taste (Amber does not lol). I eat my mayo with salmon patties, I'm not a big mayo fan, I mostly use it for moisture/dipping and my food tends to be far from bland, so it may be a balance thing.

 

Macadamia oil I find makes the nicest and most "normal" flavour mayo with a "normal" mayo colour (if that is important).

 

Second best for "normal" taste/colour are the lighter (not heat treated) olive oils. Great mayo flavour and colour too, but I'm trying to dial down my Omega-9 (non-essential fatty acid) and dial up my essential fatty acids (Avo & Mac over Olive).

How I rate them for me:

Olive = Cheaper, easily available. Healthy, but more non-essential fatty acids.

Macadamia = More expensive, harder to get for many.
Avocado = Less neutral flavour (I wouldn't make flavoured mayo with this, unless it was citrus), harder to get for many

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/macadamia-oil/

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It was $10 for a litre of oil, which is relatively inexpensive for avocado oil around here. Virgin avocado oil (the green stuff) is more than twice as much. Would the refined avocado oil be any better than the cheap light tasting olive oil?

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I would say they've probably removed the best stuff from that avocado oil. The website might tell you more, but I'd pass unless it's the only avo you can get, especially if it's expensive. Save your money for a better version.

I use a virgin avocado oil sometimes for mayo, it's a crazy bright green oil AND it makes brilliant green kermit-ish mayo (NOT a usual mayo colour - suspect kids might be afraid of it, or love it lol), but I like the taste (Amber does not lol). I eat my mayo with salmon patties, I'm not a big mayo fan, I mostly use it for moisture/dipping and my food tends to be far from bland, so it may be a balance thing.

 

Macadamia oil I find makes the nicest and most "normal" flavour mayo with a "normal" mayo colour (if that is important).

 

Second best for "normal" taste/colour are the lighter (not heat treated) olive oils. Great mayo flavour and colour too, but I'm trying to dial down my Omega-9 (non-essential fatty acid) and dial up my essential fatty acids (Avo & Mac over Olive).

How I rate them for me:

Olive = Cheaper, easily available. Healthy, but more non-essential fatty acids.

Macadamia = More expensive, harder to get for many.

Avocado = Less neutral flavour (I wouldn't make flavoured mayo with this, unless it was citrus), harder to get for many

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/macadamia-oil/

 

we have a macadamia farm (?) around the corner from out house! (well...about 15 minute drive away)

i'm sure they sell products, including oil - I might get some to make mayo out of :)

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I had the same question about the Chosen Foods avocado oil at Costco, especially after reading "naturally refined" on the label. Here's what they say about their refining method:

 

"Our avocado oil is cold pressed and naturally refined. Using a 100% chemical-free and low temperature vaporization process, we are able to extract out the impurities found in raw avocado oil, including chlorophyl, waxes, gums and sediments. The result is an entirely pure, high antioxidants oil with heat stable fatty acids." "Our avocado oil is processed at temperatures below 350 degrees Fahrenheit." 

 

Both quotes at http://www.chosen-foods.com/our-products/avocado-oil/

 

I don't know about 350F being "low temp", but then I've never asked a cold pressed olive oil just how hot it got in the process, either!

 

PS: had to satisfy my curiosity... according to the very interesting Olive Oil Source website, cold pressed is an unregulated term in the states, but in the EU it means the oil was kept under 81F. A far cry from 350F! http://www.oliveoilsource.com/definition/cold-pressed-olive-oil

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PPS after a little MORE research, I can see I'd rather make my mayo with the avocado oil refined at 350F without chemicals, than the Light Tasting Olive Oil recommended. Here's why:

 

Any olive oil labeled "light" has been refined.

 

The Why Olive Oil website tells us “Refining is a process in which the undesirable compounds are removed, such as: free fatty acids, pigments, gums, unpleasant flavor and odor. Generally, the refining of edible oils and fats is made in two ways: physically and chemically (mostly used).

 

Physical refining is a simple process in one step using steam stripping at a temperature up to 270 degrees Celsius [that's 518F!]. Has lower cost and less chemicals are used but the final product is of lower quality.

 

Chemical refining has four stages: Degumming (removal of phospholipids; water and centrifugal separation are used); Neutralization (removal of the free fatty acids using caustic soda or sodium carbonate at 95 degrees Celsius); Bleaching (removal of color and other constituents); Deodorization (at 180-270 degrees Celsius [that's 356-518F!]).

 

The other half of the story is that refining process removes also the perfect attributes of olive oil. The high temperature, stripping gas, thickness of oil layer in the deodorizer and length of the process create changes to the quality attributes of the olive oil:

    - remove all natural antioxidants

    - sterols are mostly removed as well as tocopherols

    - increases the content of stigmastadienes which show higher PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon)â€

http://www.whyoliveoil.com/refining/

 

(Wikipedia has an article on PAHs at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polycyclic_aromatic_hydrocarbon)

 

The upshot for me is that I do NOT want "light" olive oil in my body.

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Wow, that's amazing. Thank you so much for all that info! I agree, I think I'll be switching to the refined avocado oil, even being refined at 350 degrees sounds better than what the light olive oil goes through (and I hate EVOO - it tastes gross to me).

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I've never looked in to olive oil production either - thank you for the info! I don't think I've ever seen refined avo oil, but use EVOO for my mayo anyway. It's a light flavoured one and we don't mind it at all :)

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Hi All! 

 

I'm the Marketing Director at Chosen Foods and wanted to add a few points to this conversation. 

 

Chosen Foods oil is FIRST cold pressed - as opposed to being expeller pressed. Usually oils intended for refinery are expeller or chemically extracted. Expelling oil produces heat, and chemicals are obviously not what we want. Cold pressing our oil before it is refined eliminates one round of the oil being exposed to heat, which helps protect the fatty acids and nutrients in the oil.

 

After being cold pressed, our oil is refined using a proprietary low heat steam vaporization to extract the impurities. Even naturally refined oils are typically heated to well above 500F during processing - ours never goes about 350F. The gentle extraction from the steam actually preserves many of the beneficial nutrients that are found in the virgin variety. Our process preserves 60-80% of the vitamin E and 95% of the beta-sitisterols. The chlorophyll is removed, as are any waxes, gums, sediments and other free fatty acids - all which reduce the smoke point and increase the oxidative potential of the virgin counterpart.

 

Personally, homemade mayo is a must for my family. I haven't bought a jar at the store in years. Until I began working at Chosen Foods, I used olive oil but the flavor was never quite right. Even though our avocado oil is not virgin, I've seen all the tests - i know the nutrients that are still in the product, I know the peroxide value, I understand the science behind the process and I've seen all the same tests done on every single virgin avocado oil on the market. One of the great things about Chosen Foods is that they are willing to share all that data with consumers too - so if anyone would care to see nutrient testing I'm happy to share, or help explain things further.

 

It really is the only thing I will use for mayo - virgin oils are too strong in flavor and too expensive, my favorite saturated fats don't work for mayo and knowing what I do now about the oil industry, I don't trust another refined oil but Chosen Foods.  

 

If anyone wants more info I'm happy to talk! Feel free to email me at [email protected]

 

 

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Thanks so much for taking the time to post Natalie! I'm excited to give this oil a try now, planning to make some mayo today, I'll let everyone know how it turns out :)

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Just thought I'd mention that my mayo with the Chosen Foods avocado oil turned out fabulous. I made it stick-blender style, with 2 egg yolks, 1T lemon juice, 1T apple cider vinegar, 1t himalayan salt, 1/4t dry mustard powder, and a cup and a half of oil. This is my first go at homemade mayo and I'm in heaven :P

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Mine also tasted fantastic. I used it to make some blue cheese dressing, and as a dressing for chicken salad. Worked great and tasted just like I expect mayo to taste!

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I never had success making homemade mayo with olive oil so tried the expensive avacado oil with a stick blender. Saw the same avacado oil in question at Costco and bought it. Made my first batch of homemade mayo the other day. 1/4 cup finishing off my old expensive avacado oil, the remaining 1 cup with Chosen brand. (for me, must use immersion blender, otherwise never works out right). with the Chosen brand oil, the color had no green hue, smelled fine, so far have only made crabcakes, they were super. 

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I would say they've probably removed the best stuff from that avocado oil. The website might tell you more, but I'd pass unless it's the only avo you can get, especially if it's expensive. Save your money for a better version.

I use a virgin avocado oil sometimes for mayo, it's a crazy bright green oil AND it makes brilliant green kermit-ish mayo (NOT a usual mayo colour - suspect kids might be afraid of it, or love it lol), but I like the taste (Amber does not lol). I eat my mayo with salmon patties, I'm not a big mayo fan, I mostly use it for moisture/dipping and my food tends to be far from bland, so it may be a balance thing.

 

Macadamia oil I find makes the nicest and most "normal" flavour mayo with a "normal" mayo colour (if that is important).

 

Second best for "normal" taste/colour are the lighter (not heat treated) olive oils. Great mayo flavour and colour too, but I'm trying to dial down my Omega-9 (non-essential fatty acid) and dial up my essential fatty acids (Avo & Mac over Olive).

How I rate them for me:

Olive = Cheaper, easily available. Healthy, but more non-essential fatty acids.

Macadamia = More expensive, harder to get for many.

Avocado = Less neutral flavour (I wouldn't make flavoured mayo with this, unless it was citrus), harder to get for many

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/macadamia-oil/

Thanks so much for the suggestion of using macadamia oil for mayo. I'd never have thought of it although I know it won't be a cheap option.

 

I'm sure going to try it.

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I bought the same bottle of avo oil a few days ago and an immersion blender (I love Costco) and promptly whipped up some mayo. I think it tastes great. My husband is VERY particular. He ONLY eats Best Foods mayo - and he loves it. I served him chicken salad made with my homemade mayo and prepared to listen to his complaints. He liked it! He really liked it!! I was shocked. Now I just need a good ranch dressing recipe that he will like...

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I bought the same bottle of avo oil a few days ago and an immersion blender (I love Costco) and promptly whipped up some mayo. I think it tastes great. My husband is VERY particular. He ONLY eats Best Foods mayo - and he loves it. I served him chicken salad made with my homemade mayo and prepared to listen to his complaints. He liked it! He really liked it!! I was shocked. Now I just need a good ranch dressing recipe that he will like...

Another member posted a link to a paleo ranch dressing in the Recipe Sharing section. Here you go: http://forum.whole9life.com/topic/14644-ranch-dressing

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Today at costco they were sampling avocado oil (mixed with balsamic vinegar with bread dipped in it). I asked for just some of the oil and the lady looked at me like I was crazy, but gave me a little oil in one of the paper cups. It was very neutral and kind of tasteless - perfect for mayo. It's 100% avocado oil, but says it has a smoke point of 500 degrees, then lists on the side the smoke points of other oils, including "virgin avocado oil" Does this mean it's been refined and is less healthy than virgin avocado oil?

I'm with Chosen Foods the supplier of 100% natural Avocado Oil to COSTCO. Just  a quick comment on the efficacy of our Refined Oil. We also produce virgin so we play both sides of the fence but our low heat mechanical refining retains the key nutritional properties. Our Omega 3-6-9 profile is right in line with virgin avocado oil as well as our sterols. The most important being beta-sitosterol we are 84.5% and the highest virgin tested is 85.7%, happy to send any tests to you. Our tag line is "Tried Tested True Nutrition"  and we test our products and all the others on the market and there are a number of "fake" avocado oils on the market and these product will not last on the market. George

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I am actually an Avocado Oil producer located right here in the U.S.A.  Not a marketing manager, you are actually hearing from someone who runs the machines that produce the Avocado Oil.  I am here to clear up a some bad information, your Avocado Oil should be GREEN, period, exactly what Praxisproject said.  If it's NOT green, don't touch it.  Refined oils of ANY KIND, whether they say they are "naturally refined" are still REFINED OILS.  

 

Let me tell you a little secret......you only need to refine an oil when there are FLAWS in it.  That means that the original oil didn't taste very good, or the "Free Fatty Acids" (which is what the oil industry uses to measure quality), were too high (unlike school a high number is bad for oil), or the conditions under which the oil was extracted may not have been to a high cleanliness standard.  There was a reason they had to refine that oil you are drizzling all over your healthy food.  Pause for a moment. 

 

Do some Google searches:  Refining changes the structure of the oil, period.  Chosen Foods can say "naturally refined" until the cows come home, but its still REFINED.  There's been a ton of studies done on the horrible effects to your health from consuming refined oils.  I feel very sick just thinking about it. 

 

If an oil is produced correctly, there is NO reason to refine it.  My question to you all.......is "what impurities are they removing from the oil"?  What are they supposedly protecting the consumer from?  Well there's one obvious so called IMPURITY that they are removing and thats the GREEN COLOR.   Yes, Ladies and Gentlemen they are removing chlorophyll from your oil (thats what they call impurities).  Foods like: Broccoli, Kale, Chard, Avocados are chocked full of chlorophyll?  Not sure about you, but I wouldn't eat white broccoli or Kale for that matter.......so why do we think its OK to eat white avocado oil?      

 

Think about this for a minute, isn't this how our entire food chain got jacked up in the first place.......companies continue to focus on PROFITS before people.....?  

 

Please, friends don't let friends eat refined oil.

 

Corinne (The Avocado Oil Baroness) 

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We just came home from Costco today with a random bottle of Chosen Foods and now I'm so glad we did!  I'll be trying out the mayo tomorrow morning for sure.  Thanks everyone for all the tips/advice. This is my first go around. :o

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If it was neutral tasting, I'd say it had been refined. I think avo oil is quite strong in taste, and hated the mayo I made with it.

I'd say that it's not as good a choice as the virgin avo oil, but not sure about how it would compare to olive oil (not EVOO)

Hopefully, people will read this forum....in its entirety.  Thanks to our Whole9 Moderator Team, I reposted their comments here for your reference.  Please take a moment, pause and re-read the moderators comment.  She is 100% correct.  Your Avocado Oil should have taste and color (just like the source fruit).  If it has neither of those qualities, then it's refined.  Refined oils are bad for you (not one refined oil is good for you regardless of the source fruit or vegetable), not a one.  

 

Let me draw a parallel that might be easier to understand, eating refined oil is like eating refined table salt.  Table salt (versus it's healthy counterpart Himalayan Sea Salt), causes all sorts of health issues, because quite frankly it's not really salt (it does not contain the nutrients that real salt has).  While Himalayan Sea Salt is chocked full of minerals.  

 

So, while that Refined Avocado Oil says it's Avocado  Oil, it's not.  It is an altered version of Avocado Oil PERIOD, and like that table salt does not contain all the nutrients you'll get in a Raw, Extra-Virgin, Unfiltered, UnREFINED Avocado oil.

 

Eating that refined oil, might not make you feel bad tomorrow, or next year, but it will eventually catch up with you and cause plenty of health issues.  

 

Please, friends don't let friends eat refined oil.    

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Hi there, hope someone can answer this : I live in Belgium, where we are used to make our own mayo.  It's one egg yolk, a bit of mustard (with no sugar), then salt and a neutral oil.  We just bought a bottle of a combination of 4 oils (rapeseed oil, sunflower oil, grape seed oil and coriander essential oil.  I love its taste, it tastes absolutely great with a salad and I would like to use it to fry as well.  Is this Whole 30 compatible?  (gosh, I do hope so!!!).   

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