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Psychology and Coffee


Rachel7

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One of the most beneficial aspects of this adventure for me has been really, truly, finally addressing the psychology behind my eating habits. I'm a foodie to the core, and love love love coffee, as well as my late night snack. This is my first Whole 30, and the discipline of reframing food into fuel and narrowing those refuelings (however delicious) into three meals a day has been a healthy and helpful challenge.

But here's my quandary: I remember reading (in the book or on one of these, I can't remember which) that one should consider the true motivation behind some of the loves they are adamant to keep. In my experience, I really miss my afternoon coffee, not necessarily for the caffeinated jolt (thankfully I'm no longer having that 3:00 all-systems-halt!), but because I just plain enjoy it. I enjoy the taste, the comfort of holding a warm mug, and frankly even the idea of coffee, even without all the other sugar and cream and such added in. I find myself excited to go to bed, because that means that in a few hours I get to wake up and have more coffee. So....

I understand that the caffeine has a significant impact on sleeping through the night, and especially as I struggle with that anyway, I've been adamant about not having coffee after noon. But I'm struggling to really discern whether my desire is unhealthy, or if it's just normal. (I suspect dreaming about avocado or coconut milk or chorizo and waiting in anticipation for the next meal to enjoy some wouldn't be horrible.)

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It is ok to take pleasure in food. really. In the case of coffee (assuming it isn't sweetened, etc.) the concern would be drinking it in the afternoon when it would likely interfere with sleep. A cup of decaf* or hot tea that you savor and enjoy in the afternoon would be perfectly acceptable.

 

*Ideally go for Swiss Water processed organic decaf. Coffee tends to have a lot of pesticides, and "regular" decaf is a chemical process, so it is worth it to get the good stuff.

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Having a cup of coffee with a friend after lunch tends to disturb my sleep that night. I fall asleep quickly, but am more likely to wake in the night. I don't know why it works like that. In any case, I do drink a cup of coffee with a friend as often as once per week even though I suffer for it. I don't care about the psychology here, I am just trying to say that I understand doing something that makes you suffer.

 

On the other hand, I never drink coffee by myself. I drink herbal tea all day long. I drank green tea until about 6 months after my first Whole30 when I decided to go caffeine free. I found living without caffeine a very good thing for my sleep and my sense of well-being. Nowadays, I drink coffee/caffeine on Sunday morning at church and after lunch once per week with a friend. 

 

I like coffee, but I like herbal tea too. And herbal tea is kinder to my well-being. So bottom-line, I recommend getting enthusiastic about herbal teas and minimizing your coffee intake. 

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I find myself excited to go to bed, because that means that in a few hours I get to wake up and have more coffee.

 

I do this too! :)

 

I LOVE my morning cup (about 12 ounces actually) of coffee as I watch the sunrise. It's the best time of the day. I don't drink coffee for the caffeine, but for the pure love of the taste of it, too.

 

I usually only have one mug in the morning, and I cannot drink coffee past 10am, or it will interfere with my sleep.

 

Since I began my first Whole30 I use coconut oil, coconut milk  (instead of cream) blended in my coffee and I continue to drink it this way between Whole30s. So delicious!

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