Youuu, Your quads are on fire ...


Emiley Carey

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I'm on day 23, and only really started working out again in the past week. I lifted heavy two days ago and my quads hurt worse than ever! I mean, to the point where I'm incapable of lowering myself into a chair gracefully and strongly considered taking the elevator this morning. I thought I was doing good active recovery yesterday by walking and stretching but I still woke up lumbering around like a baby giraffe today.

What do ya'll do to recover from heavy lifts?

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I have found that Natural Calm Magnesium has helped for my muscle recovery from workouts.

That makes so much sense--I have been taking NC nightly, but forgot last night and skipped it. I will definitely have some tonight...but I'm focusing on arms at the gym tonight. Poor legs can't take it yet!

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Emily, what I have found to be most helpful is taking magnesium internally (first Natural Calm, then another brand in capsule form), but also taking it transdermally via magnesium gel or magenisum lotion/oil.

 

With respect to the supplements you ingest (whether capsules or loose powder), note that there are two main types of magnesium: ones that depend on their solubility in water, and the other that depends on binding with proteins. The water-soluble-dependant forms of magnesium (such as citrate) are eliminated through the body via water (!) so if you take too much, or if you've absorbed as much as your body is going to use, it will get rid of it via bowel movements and there is the possibility for getting the runs. With the protein-binding forms of magnesium (such as glycinate), there is little to no chance of diarrhea, as well as the absorbability being much better than the water-soluble forms. Note that the protein-binding forms are generally more expensive than the water-soluble forms.

 

With respect to the gels, oils, or lotions that are applied topically, these are great, because they 1) completely bypass the GI tract and therefore there is no chance of GI distress, and 2) they can be applied to any body part thus providing immediate relief to that part first, and then, through absorption throught the skin, be absorbed into the body (to provide additional benefit elsewhere). Note that there may be a slight burning or itching sensation when first using magnesium lotion/oil/gel. I have found that it goes away over time, so that now, when I apply the gel, I don't get any itching or burning at all.

 

Hope this helps!

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Emily, what I have found to be most helpful is taking magnesium internally (first Natural Calm, then another brand in capsule form), but also taking it transdermally via magnesium gel or magenisum lotion/oil.

 

With respect to the supplements you ingest (whether capsules or loose powder), note that there are two main types of magnesium: ones that depend on their solubility in water, and the other that depends on binding with proteins. The water-soluble-dependant forms of magnesium (such as citrate) are eliminated through the body via water (!) so if you take too much, or if you've absorbed as much as your body is going to use, it will get rid of it via bowel movements and there is the possibility for getting the runs. With the protein-binding forms of magnesium (such as glycinate), there is little to no chance of diarrhea, as well as the absorbability being much better than the water-soluble forms. Note that the protein-binding forms are generally more expensive than the water-soluble forms.

 

With respect to the gels, oils, or lotions that are applied topically, these are great, because they 1) completely bypass the GI tract and therefore there is no chance of GI distress, and 2) they can be applied to any body part thus providing immediate relief to that part first, and then, through absorption throught the skin, be absorbed into the body (to provide additional benefit elsewhere). Note that there may be a slight burning or itching sensation when first using magnesium lotion/oil/gel. I have found that it goes away over time, so that now, when I apply the gel, I don't get any itching or burning at all.

 

Hope this helps!

Very good! Thanks for the input and explanation!

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If you're really hard core you could use a  45 pound bar on your quads.  We sometimes do that before our CrossFit WODs at my box as a mobilization exercise.  You simply set the bar on your one leg and roll it down and up.  It hurts, but in a good way.  You should also rotate your leg so the bar is hitting your inner thigh. Our trainer has had us do a couple of front squats, mobilize with the bar and then front squat again as way to compare the difference before and after the exercise.  It's pretty amazing how much of a difference it makes.

 

You can also use a lacrosse ball to get into the nooks and crannies in your back.  You simply place it on the floor (or wall), lay on it (or press your back into the wall against it trapping it so it doesn't fall)  and roll around on it to find the places that are sore.  I find this really works on my hips too.

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  • Whole30 Certified Coach

Barbell smash.  Ouch.  Yet so effective.  Calves are another frequent target for that.  Its good practice for WODs - dealing with pain you "think" you can't deal with but actually can :)

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