Epic Bars


mquitko

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No. We ask you to learn to eat real food before and after workouts, as well as during meals. Bars of any sort are not real, whole foods. The only way packaged bar-type food is allowed is as emergency food that you might keep in your car for when you are stuck in traffic unexpectedly or for use when hiking 10 miles through the forest and carrying real, whole food is too heavy.

 

Not only is it important for you to become comfortable eating real food, it is of great benefit to you. Real meat and fish is of much higher quality than the processed crap. And for sure, Epic Bars and all the analogs are processed crap. We have grown up with marketing professionals telling us through commercials on tv, through ads in magazines, and by the paid endorsements of athletes that all these products are absolutely essential to top performance, but the truth is that real food is way better for us. Our bodies can get good out of real food that winds up in our poop when consumed as an Epic Bar or one of its analogs. 

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  • 4 months later...

I don't understand how the Epic bars are any different

than soy-free, sugar-free jerky.

 

Epic bars are the same as soy-free sugar free jerky. They are a little easier to chew, and a MUCH better choice than a Lara bar or that sort of thing, but they are still a processed food. I use them, but only as Tom suggests--when there are no other options or I'm on a long hike. For everyday post-workout you are better off if you choose something like meatballs or roasted chicken and stay out of the habit of grabbing a packaged bar and thinking that is everyday food.

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Guest sareemaree

A follow-up question: I've been using compliant Larabars to fuel my long runs. I cut one into four or five pieces and eat one piece every 2-3 miles. I used to use gels but have had pretty good success with this method. Is this an acceptable strategy or should I try to ditch the Larabars in favor of something that doesn't come in a wrapper?

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A follow-up question: I've been using compliant Larabars to fuel my long runs. I cut one into four or five pieces and eat one piece every 2-3 miles. I used to use gels but have had pretty good success with this method. Is this an acceptable strategy or should I try to ditch the Larabars in favor of something that doesn't come in a wrapper?

 

You may have to experiment. I do think something like sweet potato (maybe pureed in a squirt bottle?, or roasted and cubed?) or even chunks of banana (less fructose than the dates used in lara bars) would be better. Some people also use small amounts of fat like coconut manna or nut butter, but be careful because nut butters can be hard to digest.

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A follow-up question: I've been using compliant Larabars to fuel my long runs. I cut one into four or five pieces and eat one piece every 2-3 miles. I used to use gels but have had pretty good success with this method. Is this an acceptable strategy or should I try to ditch the Larabars in favor of something that doesn't come in a wrapper?

 

Is this on training runs or during a high-intensity race?

You should be becoming fat-adapted on the Whole30, where you no longer need to eat every 30 minutes during exercise. You have enough fat stores to run for many hours without taking in additional calories. On very long runs, I eat sweet potato or butternut squash baby food in pouches, or my own puree of sweet potato and coconut milk. I only need it about every 3 hours, depending on my effort, and mostly because of physical hunger (growling stomach), not because I'm bonking.

I also eat things like half an EPIC bar or some real food if I'm running really long.

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Guest sareemaree

Ultrarunnergirl,

 

Thanks for your reply. This is just for my weekly long run, currently 12-15 miles. I'm not racing again until November/December when I will be doing a couple of halfs and then a full in early February so my mileage will be higher later in the year. I live in South Florida and don't like to race in 95-degree+ heat - which means June to early October! 

 

I have trouble conceptualizing carrying "real food" with me but I guess the sooner I try it out the faster I will get used to the idea. 

 

I also worry about electrolyte loss running in the heat and wonder if plain water (which is what I drink) is sufficient. 

 

Thanks,

saree

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I also worry about electrolyte loss running in the heat and wonder if plain water (which is what I drink) is sufficient. 

 

You can supplement electrolytes if you wish, the issue is that most electrolyte "drinks" are filled with sugar or sweetener and artificial flavor. Coconut water, watered down with a pinch of salt is one idea, or even just water with a squeeze of lemon and a pinch of salt. 

 

If you want a supplement, elite drops can be added to water or watered-down juice, or you can take tablets. http://whole9life.com/2013/03/whole30-approved-elete-electrolytes/

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