Whey Protein Powder usage and more


switty

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Hello Everyone,

 

I just finished reading the book and will be starting my Whole30 - vegetarian program soon. I want to incorporate a variety of protiens apart from Eggs. A few questions for a vegetarian version of this diet (like many others here - eating meat/fish is not an option for me).

 

1. I know whey protien pwd is allowed (though not the best option). Since juicing fruits and veggies is not considered a good idea, how do you use this protien pwd? Any ideas?

2. Has anyone successfully used "Properly Prepared Legumes" (yet another Not-the-best-but-good option)?

3. Between Yogurt and Properly-Prepared-Legumes - which is better? Or lesser of the two evils?

 

Thank you and wish me luck!

 

 

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I'm wondering about Almased protein powder?

 

It's fermented soy, from Germany...is this powder allowed?

 

We prefer that you get your protein from real, whole foods and not a powder. Protein powder is a concession made because getting adequate protein on a vegetarian diet is challenging. Fermented soy protein powder would be acceptable for vegetarians, but it would be better if you consumed tempeh, natto, edamame, or tofu. 

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We prefer that you get your protein from real, whole foods and not a powder. Protein powder is a concession made because getting adequate protein on a vegetarian diet is challenging. Fermented soy protein powder would be acceptable for vegetarians, but it would be better if you consumed tempeh, natto, edamame, or tofu. 

Okay, I will comply.   I would only use in a pinch if I was driving for a long stretch with no stops.

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Set aside that powder is inferior to real food (as Tom says), there's also some "more natural" choices, like hemp or pumpkin (no other ingredients). Over here I can find those in whole food stores. At least they don't contain any of that artificial crap that usually gets thrown into protein powders.

Almased, as far as I can see online, does also contain honey = sweetened = not Whole30. 

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  • 3 months later...

I do a ton of stuff with "properly prepared" legumes, I think.  (Is the recipe still, "soak for 24 hours, boil for 20 minutes, simmer until done?" That's how I learned from Melissa a couple of years ago.)  Frankly it works great with any legume dish.  For example, I recently made a white-bean and kale soup this way.  DEEEEE-lish! 

 

More tips on cooking from dried: do not add tomatoes, lemon juice, vinegar or any other acidic ingredient until the beans are fully cooked.  Acidity prevents the tough outer part of a dried bean from cooking.  The converse is also true: if you are working from old beans that seem like they NEVER want to cook, try adding a tiiiiiiiiny pinch of baking soda to the cooking water.  Presto, instant alkalinity, those tough skins will soften.  ;)

Finally, use MORE salt in the recipe than you otherwise might; the canned beans have a lot of salt to start with, and your dried ones don't.

 

Other great recipe ideas:

 

*kidney bean chili

*black bean soup

*black bean/sweet potato patties:  cook the black beans per instructions, then mash most of them then mix 'em all with shredded sweet potato, plus an egg, and whatever spices you like.  (For me, that's a mix of sauteed minced onion, garlic, jalapeno pepper, and dried cumin, plus salt and a squeeze of lime.)  Form into patties and bake.  Yummy!

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