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MeadowLily

Did you find yourself sweeter and kinder after Whole30 reintro?

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I've made smoothies and salads all of my life.   I've replaced smoothies with authentic food groups but I still make a bloomin' salad every day.

 

The "Blooming Salad" on one half of your plate gives your brain and body what it wants.  For those who struggle with binge eating...it's not the quality of food that matters, but large quantities.   Large quantities are wanted to fill the endless tank.  One more binge is not a treatment for a food addiction.

 

To turn this off, you have to create new patterns to replace old habits.

 

Another "Bloomin' Salad"   will help you create a new pattern.

 

It's the stuffed, running over the top feeling that another binge gives you that motivates binge after binge after binge....

 

Isn't a real change what all of this is about?

 

Create a new pattern to stop bingeing and food addictions

 

 

Blooming Salads

 

You can fill one half of your plate with salads, they will satisfy and curb the old desire for another secret binge.  In the beginning, you may want a large mixing bowl full of salad to accompany the rest of your meal....proteins, good fats and a cooked vegetable, too.

 

It's the full feeling you're after...a blowback from months and years of binge-ing.

 

Isn't a real change what you want after a Whole 30?

 

Blooming Salads

 

Le Grande Orange

 

1 large orange, peeled into sections

1/2 shredded green cabbage

8 macadamia nuts, chopped

1/2-1 leek stalk, finely chopped or

2 scallions

1 bunch of butter lettuce

1 small bunch watercress

 

Le Grande Orange contains A, C, E and B's

Blooming Salads keep your skin spot free

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Radiant Glow


 


4 hard-boiled eggs, sliced


1 head Bibb lettuce


2 heads radicchio


1 bunch watercress


1 head Boston lettuce


1 leek stalk, finely chopped


 


 


Minerals for the skin, hair, nails....Zinc, iron, phosphorus, A, B2, D and E


Eggs are basic building blocks for skin, hair, teeth, eyes and nails


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Make yourself another "Bloomin' Salad" today.

 

Another binge will never fill the empty tank.  Bingeing today won't help tomorrow's resolve.

There aren't enough binges in the world that will ever put a stop to that gerbil wheel and endless destructive cycle.

 

Create a new pattern for your life

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When Too Much Exercise is Detrimental to Your Health


 


One study followed 1,038 patients with heart disease for 10 years and found that those who vigorously exercised daily were more than twice as likely to die of a heart attack or stroke than those who exercised only two to four days a week, while those who exercised rarely or never had the worst outcomes.


That finding is startling because current medical recommendations call for heart-disease patients (like everyone else) to exercise five to seven days a week. Those recommendations aren't likely to change on the basis of a single study, especially one drawn from potentially unreliable patient reports of how much they exercise.


The second study adds to already substantial evidence that endurance exercise increases the risk of atrial fibrillation, a generally non-life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia that greatly increases the risk of stroke. This finding parallels that of a previous study that found a 74% increase in the risk of atrial fibrillation in men younger than 50 who exercised vigorously five to seven days a week.


The two studies will intensify debate within sports medicine about the health implications of endurance athletics such as serial marathon running. By all accounts, exercise at low to moderate levels confers dramatic protection from disease of nearly every kind, and many studies suggest that greater amounts deliver greater benefits.


But in some recent population studies, the substantial longevity benefit associated with moderate exercise disappeared at extreme levels, while other studies have shown higher levels of coronary calcium in serial marathoners.


Accompanying the two studies in Heart is an editorial called "Exercise and the heart: unmasking Mr. Hyde." It argues that the medical community must continue promoting exercise to a too-sedentary public, but suggests that maybe the time has come to acknowledge that more isn't always better.


—Kevin Helliker


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When Too Much Competition is Detrimental to Your Health


 


We succeed in spite of competition, not because of it. Most of us were raised to believe that we do our best work when we're in a race -- that without competition we would all become mediocre. It's a belief that our society takes on faith.


 


There is good evidence that productivity in the workplace suffers as a result of competition. The research is even more compelling in classroom settings. David Johnson, a professor of social psychology at the University of Minnesota, and his colleagues reviewed all the studies they could find on the subject from 1924 to 1980. Sixty-five of the studies found that children learn better when they work cooperatively as opposed to competitively, eight found the reverse, and 36 found no significant difference. The more complex the learning task, the worse children in a competitive environment fared.


 


Brandeis University psychologist Teresa Amabile was more interested in creativity. In a study, she asked children to make "silly collages." Some competed for prizes and some didn't. Seven artists then independently rated the kids' work. It turned out that those who were trying to win produced collages that were much less creative -- less spontaneous, complex and varied -- than the others.


 


One after another, researchers across the country have concluded that children do not learn better when education is transformed into a competitive struggle. Why? First, competition often makes kids anxious and that interferes with concentration. Second, competition doesn't permit them to share their talents and resources as cooperation does, so they can't learn from one another. Finally, trying to be Number One distracts them from what they're supposed to be learning. It may seem paradoxical, but when a student concentrates on the reward (an A or a gold star or a trophy), she becomes less interested in what she's doing. The result: Performance declines.


 


Competition is a recipe for hostility. By definition, not everyone can win a contest. If one child wins, another cannot. This means that each child comes to regard others as obstacles to his or her own success


 


Competition leads us to envy winners, to dismiss losers (there's no nastier epithet in our language than "Loser!"), and to be suspicious of just about everyone. Competition makes it difficult to regard others as potential friends or collaborators; even if you're not my rival today, you could be tomorrow.


 


This is not to say that competitors will always detest each other. But trying to outdo someone is not conducive to trust -- indeed, it would be irrational to trust someone who gains from your failure. At best, competition leads one to look at others through narrowed eyes; at worst, it invites outright aggression. Existing relationships are strained to the breaking point, while new friendships are often nipped in the bud.


 


Again, the research -- which I review in my book No Contest: The Case Against Competition -- helps to explain the destructive effect of win/lose arrangements. When we compete, we are less able to take the perspective of others -- that is, to see the world from someone else's point of view. One study demonstrated conclusively that competitive people were less empathetic than others; another study showed that competitive people were less generous.


 


Cooperation, on the other hand, is marvelously successful at helping to communicate effectively, to trust in others and to accept those who are different from themselves. 


 


Having fun doesn't mean turning playing fields into battlefields. It's remarkable, when you stop to think about it, that the way we teach our kids to have a good time is to play highly structured games in which one individual or team must defeat another.


 


 


As for reducing sibling rivalry and competitive attitudes in the home:



  • Avoid comparing a child's performance to that of a sibling, a classmate, or yourself as a child.




  • Don't use contests ("Who can dry the dishes fastest?") around the house. Watch your use of language ("Who's the best little girl in the whole wide world?") that reinforces competitive attitudes.




  • Be aware of your power as a model. If you need to beat others, the lesson will be even stronger if you use your child to provide you with vicarious victories.



 


Copyright © 1987 by Alfie Kohn. 


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Comparison, Competition and Eating Disorders

 

"One of the most exhausting things about having an eating disorder is the non-stop racket in your brain. And while some of that chatter is about calories, food, and exercise – a lot of it is how you compare with other people.

 

Is s/he skinnier than I am? She’s eating a salad – she must think I’m so fat for eating a sandwich. So-and-so used to spend X hours at the gym – I only spent Y.

 

More than anything, I just wanted my brain to shut up.

 

Comparison and Competition Over Eating Disorders

 

In all my time in treatment for anorexia, I have never met a woman who thought she was “sick enough” to be in treatment. (I suspect the same holds true for men with eating disorders, but I have been to female-only treatment centers.) It was a reality my dietitian had to prepare me for when I went into treatment the first time: “There will be women who are sicker than you and thinner than you. But make no mistake,” she said, “you’ve earned your place in treatment.

 

Even now, after multiple trips to treatment and a stack of treatment plans almost as tall as some of my school books, I find myself doubting that I was ever really sick. “After all,” I think, “didn’t you just have a hamburger last week? Clearly you didn’t really have an eating disorder. Jane Doe hasn’t had a burger in XX years – she has a real eating disorder.” To be sure, this is the voice of my eating disorder, always trying to suck me back in to this mind trap where I am lacking in some quality or trait – which can easily be fixed by bingeing, restricting, exercising, whatever.

 

Anything You Can Do, I Can Do Better

 

Even if we’re not conscious about it, as people with eating disorders we are always competing. And if we are conscious about it, we’re not talking about it. But the reality is – every one of us is trying to be the “sickest” – the “best at the eating disorder” – the “thinnest.”

blueribbon.jpg

Congratulations! You killed yourself with an eating disorder! Would you like us to bury you with your winner's ribbon?

It’s why some people come out of treatment centers sicker than they went in. It’s why maintaining friendships with people you meet in treatment can be so potentially disastrous. It’s why I don’t use numbers or specific behaviors when I write this blog."

 

Every single one of us is trying to beat the other. We are all trying to snag that blue ribbon that proves we’re “the best.”

 

You know what that blue ribbon looks like? A gravestone.

Because this is a zero-sum game. You will never win when you compare yourself to others. You only win when you die. And I can tell you most assuredly that nobody is waiting for you in the afterlife, ready to pin a ribbon on your shirt.

 

You can’t win with an eating disorder. So quit playing the game.

 

 

Posted on March 20, 2014 by Jessica Hudgens

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I love you, MeadowLily. This is such good, important information.

This, right here, is vital: "Competition is a recipe for hostility. By definition, not everyone can win a contest. If one [person] wins, another cannot. This means that each [person] comes to regard others as obstacles to his or her own success."

I wrote a long passionate post and then tried to fool around with the formatting and lost it all. Anyway, my life changed 21 years ago when I realized that I was literally killing myself with competition. I wanted to "win" EVERYTHING... at work, with friends, with strangers, all the time. And of course I'm NOT the best at everything, I didn't always "win," and the methods I used to comfort/console myself were destructive and dangerous (food and alcohol). I found help for the alcoholism, and in the process discovered that competition was not the way I want to live. It's lonely, isolating, sad. I'm happy to report that today I can truly be happy for others' successes; I cheer on my friends' efforts at whatever they do; I can play Monopoly and not care if I win (really!); I don't race for parking spaces; I slow down if someone wants to pass me. I no longer believe in a world where there is "limited pie." That is, I no longer believe that there is a finite amount of good in the universe, and that if you get a big slice, I must get a small slice because there is just the one 9-inch pie... nope... I believe in unlimited pie. If you get a huge slice, maybe you can show me how you did it and I'll get a huge slice too; abundance, not scarcity and limitation. No more zero-sum gane. If I get more it does not mean you get less, and vice-versa. Unlimited pie.

That isn't an original idea of mine; I heard a speaker years ago and the idea grabbed me. I will see if I can find a reference somewhere, and will post it here when/if I find it.

I am on day 30 of a whole-at-least-60. I've seen some health improvement, mood improvement, energy increase, and weight loss/redistribution, and I think there are more changes to come before I look at reintroduction. I didn't get to this condition in 30 days (50 pounds overweight, couch potato, exhausted, type 2 diabetes, etc., etc.), and I'm not going to recover in 30 days. So... onward.

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 10:02 AM

Whole9 Moderator/First Whole30 May 2010

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I waited 4 months before I began to eat anything off plan. I don't think that a Whole120 is better than a Whole30, but you don't have to retest how you feel with any foods until you are ready. 

Do you know the forum rules? Review them at http://forum.whole9l.../6-forum-rules/

 

I think the value of doing a Whole30 is to begin seeing meat, fish, eggs, veggies, and fruit as the good stuff and to start thinking of everything else as an unavoidable evil that you have to deal with occasionally. 

 

Browse 400 Whole30-compliant recipes at 

Tom Denham's http://www.wholelifeeating.com

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 06:29 AM

Whole9 Moderator/First Whole30 May 2010

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My guess is that it is not just the dairy. You might have a small problem with dairy at this point - like the one you had after eating some cheese and Greek yogurt - but not a problem that lasts more than 24 hours.

What happens physically is that your body loses the gut flora used to digest dairy when you don't eat it for a long time. If you eat some, your gut cannot fully digest it and you may have :P  diarrhea. :P  But the problem should be relatively short-lived. You pass that serving and you are done. 

Some people lose the ability to digest dairy even when they eat it regularly. Those are the lactose intolerant.

Dairy can be problematic even when you can digest it - influencing insulin, hormones, etc. 

Do you know the forum rules? Review them at http://forum.

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 04:56 AM

Whole9 Moderator/First Whole30 May 2010

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The only dairy I have nowadays is what is in sauces at Indian and other restaurants I frequent. I eat a dessert at least a few times per year and I guess many of those would have some dairy, but that's it for me. I think my dairy intake is sane. 

Do you know the forum rules? Review them at http://forum.whole9l.../6-forum-rules/

 

I think the value of doing a Whole30 is to begin seeing meat, fish, eggs, veggies, and fruit as the good stuff and to start thinking of everything else as an unavoidable evil that you have to deal with occasionally. 

 

Browse 400 Whole30-compliant recipes at 

Tom Denham's http://www.wholelifeeating.com

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 09:22 AM

Whole9 Moderator/First Whole30 May 2010

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No. You should never load up on anything you eat. If you are going to reintroduce dairy, you should eat a serving of dairy at two or three meals for a day or two to see how it goes. If you only eat one serving or just a few bites, you might not get a reaction. If you eat a huge portion of dairy, you might feel bad even if the dairy does not provoke big problems for you. The idea is to eat a few servings across a day or two to see how your body responds to reasonable portions.

You should reintroduce one new food at a time. If you reintroduce two things at a time, you can't tell which of the two might be a problem for you. This can be a problem with sugar because sugar is often packaged with dairy or grains. What you would need to do is reintroduce dairy without sugar. If that works okay, after several days you might eat some dairy with sugar added. By going in steps, you have a better chance of identifying where your issues might be. 

Do you know the forum rules? Review them at http://forum.whole9l.../6-forum-rules/

 

I think the value of doing a Whole30 is to begin seeing meat, fish, eggs, veggies, and fruit as the good stuff and to start thinking of everything else as an unavoidable evil that you have to deal with occasionally. 

 

Browse 400 Whole30-compliant recipes at 

Tom Denham's http://www.wholelifeeating.com

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Posted 21 August 2013 - 02:34 PM

Whole9 Moderator/First Whole30 May 2010

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You don't need to test reintroduce potatoes. Potatoes themselves are fairly benign. 

Do you know the forum rules? Review them at http://forum.whole9l.../6-forum-rules/

 

I think the value of doing a Whole30 is to begin seeing meat, fish, eggs, veggies, and fruit as the good stuff and to start thinking of everything else as an unavoidable evil that you have to deal with occasionally. 

 

Browse 400 Whole30-compliant recipes at 

Tom Denham's http://www.wholelifeeating.com

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 07:35 PM

Whole9 Moderator/First Whole30 May 2010

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Here is a good article on soy: http://www.huffingto..._b_1822466.html

 

Here is an interesting article on flax seeds: http://www.livestron...d-side-effects/

 

The Whole9 calls quinoa a pseudo grain and warns that you may experience subtle effects with quinoa similar to other regular grains. 

 

One of the problems we face in making empirical judgments about how foods affect us is that some symptoms may be so subtle that we may not notice them. I would not say that you would definitely have problems from consuming these foods, but with so many other healthy foods available, why would you eat these?

Do you know the forum rules? Review them at http://forum.whole9l.../6-forum-rules/

 

I think the value of doing a Whole30 is to begin seeing meat, fish, eggs, veggies, and fruit as the good stuff and to start thinking of everything else as an unavoidable evil that you have to deal with occasionally. 

 

Browse 400 Whole30-compliant recipes at 

Tom Denham's http://www.wholelifeeatin

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 11:14 AM

Whole9 Moderator/First Whole30 May 2010

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Yes and no. Your body defends itself against foods that irritate it by developing a thicker mucosal lining in the gut. When you stop eating irritating foods for 30 days, the excess mucosal lining sloughs off leaving you less protected. When you reintroduce these foods again, you may feel more discomfort than you did before because you have less protection against them than you did before. If you keep eating them, you will grow the thicker lining back and have the same level of protection that you did before. 

 

It can be difficult to distinguish between feeling worse and simply noticing how you feel more accurately after going a period without irritation. You may think you feel worse, but really you just notice how you feel; your feelings feel new and not business as usual. 

 

When people begin to eat meat after months or years of not eating meat, their guts do not have all the correct bacteria needed to digest the meat. It takes time for our bodies to grow the correct bacteria, so vegetarians require an adjustment period. This adjustment can be supported and sped along by taking digestive enzymes and probiotics to get the gut to where it needs to be faster. After a period of weeks or maybe a few months, the gut should be ready to operate on its own without extra assistance. 

Do you know the forum rules? Review them at http://forum.whole9l.../6-forum-rules/

 

I think the value of doing a Whole30 is to begin seeing meat, fish, eggs, veggies, and fruit as the good stuff and to start thinking of everything else as an unavoidable evil that you have to deal with occasionally. 

 

Browse 400 Whole30-compliant recipes at 

Tom Denham's http://www.wholelifeeating.co

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