Starting next week - please look over my day one meal plan


Crystalm

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Hi Everyone!

 

I plan to start next week, and I have written out my day 1 meal plan.  Please review it to see if I am overlooking something or adding too much of something.

 

Breakfast:

Casserole (eggs, onion, mushroom, compliant bacon, coconut milk)

Coffee with coconut milk

 

Lunch:

Tuna (prepackaged; only water)

Hard boiled egg

Steamed green beans

white-flesh nectarine

La Croix Grapefruit Sparkling Water

 

Supper:

Grilled chicken (salt, pepper, EVOO)

Scrambled eggs (cooked in ghee)

Cubed sweet potatoes (1/2 sweet potato; cooked in coconut oil with parsley, salt, & paprika)

Water

 

I'm worried that I do not have enough fat.  I do not like avocados or olives.  

 

I've made a Red Wine Vinaigrette for salads, but it doesn't taste good.  It has a really strong, bitter, acid taste.  I do have raw carrots and cashews on hand.

 

Is it okay to have eggs for all three meals (casserole, hard boiled, & then scrambled)?

 

What do I need to adjust?  Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

 

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Hi there and welcome.

 

Overall, things look good. I would agree on adding fat, especially to your lunch. Homemade mayo made with either extra light olive oil or macadamia nut oil would be my top recommendation. 

 

On the casserole, make sure your serving has ideally 1-3 cups of veggies.

 

Not sure you need the added eggs at lunch or supper.  Per the recommended meal template, have 1-2 palms of the tuna at lunch and the same for the chicken at supper. At lunch, you could melt ghee on your vegetables for added fat. At dinner, have the whole sweet potato.  

 

Ultimately, play with your portion sizes of protein, veggies and fat to get your meals to satiate you for 4-5 hours.

There are many good compliant homemade vinaigrette dressings you can make.  Here's a thread with some options, and Google for others. 

 

On the water, aim for 1/2 an ounce of water per pound of body weight daily.

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Thank you for your quick reply and links.  I made adjustments below.  Does it look better?


 


I like the combination of balsamic vinegar and red wine vinegar, but what can I add to it to make it thicker for salads?


 


Breakfast:


Protein & Vegetables: Casserole (eggs, onion, mushroom, compliant bacon, garlic, coconut milk)


Vegetables: Raw zucchini, squash, cabbage cold salad (balsamic & red wine vinegar mixture)


Fat: Coffee with coconut milk


 


Lunch:


Protein: Tuna (prepackaged; only water)


Fat: Mayo with Tuna


Vegetable: Steamed green beans


Fruit: white-flesh nectarine


La Croix Grapefruit Sparkling Water


 


Supper:


Protein: Grilled chicken (salt, pepper, EVOO)


Vegetable: salad with dressing (balsamic & red wine vinegar mixture)


Vegetable: Cubed sweet potatoes (1 sweet potato; cooked in coconut oil with parsley, salt, & paprika)  will the coconut oil cover the fat?


Water


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On making the dressing thicker, use a compliant oil that you like (e.g., macadamia nut oil), compliant dijon mustard, and/or for something creamy, mix in the homemade mayo.

Your changes look good. Don't be afraid of fat. :-) Cooking fat tends to predominantly stay behind in the pan, so account for that.

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Ditto on the mustard.  It's a core ingredient of my basic balsamic along with EVOO, red wine vinegar, balsamic, pepper, and usually tarragon.  I wouldn't call the result thick, though.  I usually soak tomatoes and red onions in it, so I make it thin.  Thicker restaurant balsamics likely have corn starch or similar emulsifiers.  Bob's Red Mill sells xanthan gum, which is compliant.  It may take a safari to find it, though.

 

BTW, I notice you mention grilled chicken and EVOO in the same breath.  Forgive me if you're well aware that EVOO is for cold drizzling and mixing, and OO is for saute.  The smokepoint of EVOO causes its fat to get destroyed easily, as in failing to contribute its nutrition and participate in fat's critical role in your body.  Grilling has different meanings to different people.  You'll also get a delicious sear on the chicken if you moist heat cook it with an oil versus dry heat cooking it on some sort of grilling device.  Oil and a dry rub would take that even further.  Deglaze the pan with chicken broth after removing the piece of chicken to rest, and you're pretty much making what I served for dinner tonight.

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Thank you all for your replies.

Another question. .. which is better to cook eggs in - ghee or coconut oil?

 

Depends on your personal preference, both are good choices...as is the above mentioned bacon grease. I personally prefer eggs cooked in ghee but I will do both.

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Thank you all for your replies.

Another question. .. which is better to cook eggs in - ghee or coconut oil?

I find a combo of coconut oil AND ghee together makes my scrambled eggs taste magical.  Yes, magical.  I just discovered this recently, and I will never go back to just ghee.

 

...But maybe I am a weirdo because it is Day 18 and I am still loving my eggs...   ^_^

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I like the ghee. I am fine with the TASTE of the coconut oil, but have a hard time getting past the smell (it makes me want to go lay out by a pool and have a drink with a paper umbrella).

 

for me:

Cooking = ghee

cold = olive oil

 

I hate avocados and olives, have a lifelong aversion to mayonnaise, and am allergic to nuts so my fat choices have been limited (and yes, the dislikes and aversions are my own edits!). I did find some raw sunflower seeds that hadn't been processed with any other nuts and I made a "butter" from that, but it was really disgusting. If I'm eating eggs, I count them as my fat too, due to the fat content in the yolks.

 

Who ever thought eating enough fat would be an issue!!

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I like the ghee. I am fine with the TASTE of the coconut oil, but have a hard time getting past the smell (it makes me want to go lay out by a pool and have a drink with a paper umbrella).

 

for me:

Cooking = ghee

cold = olive oil

 

I hate avocados and olives, have a lifelong aversion to mayonnaise, and am allergic to nuts so my fat choices have been limited (and yes, the dislikes and aversions are my own edits!). I did find some raw sunflower seeds that hadn't been processed with any other nuts and I made a "butter" from that, but it was really disgusting. If I'm eating eggs, I count them as my fat too, due to the fat content in the yolks.

 

Who ever thought eating enough fat would be an issue!!

 

I too find a combo of ghee and coconut oil particularly nice.

 

When we first did Whole30, my husband did NOT want to try coconut oil, he hates coconut. Well guess what? He likes coconut oil. Once you taste food that has been cooked in it and realize it doesn't taste coconutty, you might just love what it does for your veggies.

 

I didn't grow up eating mayo, we only occasionally had Miracle Whip on our BLTs. Otherwise my mother cooked just about everything from scratch (and she does not like condiments, so we didn't use them often). Anyway, when I first tasted Hellman's mayo (or any other) I found them disgusting.

 

But for some reason, I went ahead and made my first batch of homemade mayo during my first Whole30. And I absolutely adore the stuff. We make it into Spicy Secret Sauce, a recipe tucked away in Well Fed, under the Egg Foo Yong recipe. Deeeeelightful!

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