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Fermented Cod Liver Oil with Butter Oil


majudd

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Personally, I would think the nutrient density and other upsides of the CLO and BO would far outweigh any negatives from the little bit of stevia found in 1 daily teaspoon. 

 

Unfortunately these ingredients don't remove the stevia from this product. :)  The rules are black and white on this point: no sugar or any sweetener of any kind in any amount on a Whole30.

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If you want to continue your fermented cod liver oil/butter oil supplementation during the whole30, green pastures makes products without stevia. The arctic mint, for example, has no sweetener, and the stand alone butter oil (which I would consider similar to clarified butter) has no flavoring.

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In this case, I do not think the rules are in line with the basic goal of Whole 30, which I gather is to impact ones health for the better. I also personally feel it is an exercise in dietary self-control, and very enlightening when you are forced to read your food labels. I can see eliminating most sugar and other sweeteners, because you don't want people making paleo treats and missing the point. But eliminating a little bit of stevia to help someone get an amazing supplement down, when you allow fruit and fruit juices that contain far more sugar, and that are far less nutritious, does not make sense. Are more reasonable goal would be to allow sugar and stevia, etc, in very small quantities, in some important supplements and foods (like bacon). Or, perhaps, require no more than ___ g of carbs per hour, which would put all sweeteners and sweet fruits/vegetables on equal footing as far as carbs go. In fact, I don't even understand why fruit juices are allowed at all. I am getting by just fine without them!

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In this case, I do not think the rules are in line with the basic goal of Whole 30, which I gather is to impact ones health for the better. 

 

How is switching to a version of the supplement that does not contain stevia making your health worse than sticking with the stevia sweetened one?

 

The rules of the whole30 are black and white on purpose. After the whole30 you get to decide how much sugar or sweetener is acceptable to you, and you could very likely decide the chocolate-flavored fermented cod liver oil/butter oil blend is acceptable and "worth it" in your regular life. During the whole30, no amount of added sweetener is acceptable (unless in prescribed medication). Is it annoying and challenging to find stuff without sweetener? you bet it is. That is part of the learning process.

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I am sorry if I am coming off as frustrated, I just need rules that make sense to me. If stevia were like gluten, then absolutely, not a drop should be allowed all month. And I also get the goal of forcing people to read all labels. But if fruit juice is allowed as an ingredient, presumably to make something taste better (i haven't come across those recipes, so I don't know what that is), then the rules are inconsistent if they don't also allow for sugar in bacon, and stevia in CLO. The chocolate flavored CLO/BO is the only one I can tolerate, and the US Wellness bacon is too expensive. I have access to great pastured & nitrate free bacon at our farmers market, but it has sugar. Perhaps there is something inherently dangerous about actual sugar and stevia, that is not also a factor in fruit juice? If this is the case, then it would help to understand that. 

 

I cut out very dark chocolate because of the little bit of sugar in it, knowing that I don't really need dark chocolate, and figuring that this month is partially an exercise in self control (among other things). But bacon and CLO are not about self control or slaying the sugar dragon. 

 

I really do appreciate everyone's time in responding to this thread. 

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Stevia by weight causes 300 times the sweetness sensation of fructose, but negligible increases in blood glucose.

 

So while it's only milligrams in a teaspoon, in the pure interest of a precise program with exact rules and moderators that interpret the fringes of those rules for us, if you're consciously using a stevia product, you're not psychologically on a Whole30.  You may be doing many great things for yourself, but the mindset is as important as the chemistry.  You're right, it is an exercise in self-control.  We would all encourage you to follow the straight and narrow, then expand on day 31.  A 99% Whole30 is a good thing, but 100% is better.

 

What if you mixed your omega-3 oils with raw foods?  Would that solve the flavor problem?  As long as you don't heat it, you get the benefits.  What about mixing your own cocoa powder with another oil from the same maker that has no sweetener?

 

Does the maker seem to be the type of supplement vendor that would say stevia leaf when they really mean processed stevia?  Some vendors like their ingredient lists to read like song lyrics rather than methanol output.

 

Stevia leaf is still not approved by the FDA or granted Generally Regarded As Safe status.  However, this is viewed as protectionist toward the US artificial sweetener industry.  Commercial stevia from Coke and Pepsi is a dried, water extracted, solvent extracted, and filtered processed product from stevia leaf.  Fresh stevia leaf is not sweet at all. 

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But if fruit juice is allowed as an ingredient, presumably to make something taste better (i haven't come across those recipes, so I don't know what that is)

 

I have several marinades that I like that use fruit juice, mostly a citrus like oranges. Now, I am squeezing my own oranges for those, not buying a bottle of juice... but that is one way to use fruit juice as a recipe ingredient.

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I appreciate the response from Advanced Member, but you have apparently not tasted fermented cod liver oil. I have tried making it palatable on my own (even prior to Whole 30), because it would save money, and I cannot do it. I have a tremendous amount of respect for Green Pastures, the maker of the FCLO, and I believe his labels. I can tell you that the product does not taste sweet at all. By adding flavoring, they have merely managed to cut the bitterness down to an acceptable level. 

 

I will just do this program my own way. I feel great with all of the vegetables I have added to my diet, the weight I have lost, and the habits I have formed around making my own dressings etc. The self control I have had to muster to stay away from some of my favorite things that are not approved (dark chocolate) and my other favorites that are approved but that I need to avoid because they feed my sugar dragon (some bars made with dates/nuts) has given me a sense of accomplishment. But until I hear something that makes this amount of stevia worse for me than a piece of fruit, or some juice added to a marinade, I am sticking with the flavored FCLO/BO. Thanks for the input!

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That's a sensible conclusion.  Ultimately you end up making huge net gains doing your own thing and feeling good about it.  This isn't Whole365, and clearly if you did choose to skip your omega-3 supplements for a month, you would eagerly re-introduce them.  You're faithful to this product and its benefits.

 

In agreeing with you, I cause myself a bit of trouble because psychologically, you're off the mindset.  Therefore, I think I'd overstep if I suggested more moderator to Hartwigs side discussion about the sweetness of stevia leaf.  Ultimately, stevia leaf is put into a food for one purpose no matter how weak the effect, to sweeten.  Even though Coke (Truvia) and Pepsi (PureVia) need to process leaf with methanol to get FDA GRAS status, they start with something that produces sweetness.

 

It's more a question of avoidability.  You're right, I've never had FCLO and if it tastes like penance, I'd think some enterprising supplement maker would offer it in vegetable cellulose capsules if it is that intolerable.  What the mods have suggested is to pursue alternatives that produce the same gain.

 

Yes, there are exceptions made in the can I have guide, but given the volume of changes we make and the omissions we all abide by, there needs to be some point of rationalization to create a diverse menu so people succeed on Whole30 and repeat their experience.  So when dining out, we can have seed oils.  We can cook with more than just lemon juice.

 

Stevia isn't a menu diversifier, it's an additive sweetener.  That's not the same effect as cooking with cranberries.  Stevia is omittable, cranberries are integral to a recipe's distinct taste and prevent a repetitious taste rut that can demotivate.

 

Stevia was banned in the 90s and only after the extensive testing with Coke, Cargill, Pepsi, and Whole Earth did the FDA approved dried, rehydrated, methanol extruded and multi-round filtered stevia.  Leaf is still not GRAS, although it is no longer banned.

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  • 1 year later...

I use the CLO by Nutrapro which is also recommended by WAPF.  There is only added a little peppermint oil or lemon oil, but not sweetener and it is not fermented but it tastes just fine.  I take this with High Vitamin Butter Oil, both as a supplement.  I am getting ready to start a Whole 30 and plan on continuing this supplement while on Whole 30.  You might want to try a different brand of CLO as there is a question as to whether fermented CLO is rancid anyway.  Good luck

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