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BREAKING: dietary cholesterol isn't bad

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Was happy (and a little vindicated) to hear this widely broadcast NPR piece on why, gasp!, dietary cholesterol isn't the bugaboo it was made out to be based on that old discredited study based on powdered egg yolks.

New Dietary Guidelines May Lighten Caution Against Cholesterol

http://one.npr.org/i/385537426:385537432

Oh, but, oops, I gave credit too soon. They end with a warning that saturated fat is still considered bad. (By whom? Which scientists?)

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My sister is a dietitian and definitely follows "conventional" wisdom. She's never had weight problems, and is more of a "food is fuel" person by nature, so she doesn't have a personal connection to the sugar/carb can't-loose-weight-no-matter-what-I-do-and-I-clearly-have-no-willpower symptoms of the modern diet that many of us suffer with. 

 

I'm going to lend her "It starts with food" next time I see her. A. I want her take on it and b. I'm hoping I can get her to change her thinking. 

 

She treats a lot of diabetic patients...I haven't asked her specifically about her protocol, but I would guess its the SAD recommendation for diabetics...

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My sister is a dietitian and definitely follows "conventional" wisdom. She's never had weight problems, and is more of a "food is fuel" person by nature, so she doesn't have a personal connection to the sugar/carb can't-loose-weight-no-matter-what-I-do-and-I-clearly-have-no-willpower symptoms of the modern diet that many of us suffer with. 

 

I'm going to lend her "It starts with food" next time I see her. A. I want her take on it and b. I'm hoping I can get her to change her thinking. 

 

She treats a lot of diabetic patients...I haven't asked her specifically about her protocol, but I would guess its the SAD recommendation for diabetics...

My guess would be that since as a dietician she is considered an expert in the field of nutrition she won't be open to new ideas. How did it go?

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Was happy (and a little vindicated) to hear this widely broadcast NPR piece on why, gasp!, dietary cholesterol isn't the bugaboo it was made out to be based on that old discredited study based on powdered egg yolks.

Oh, but, oops, I gave credit too soon. They end with a warning that saturated fat is still considered bad. (By whom? Which scientists?)

 

The myth that dietary cholesterol is to blame for raised blood cholesterol has been around for some time.  It has even infiltrated dietary guidelines.  In particular the USA have long advised the restriction of dietary cholesterol to below 300mg per day.  However last year their advisory committee said that cholesterol restriction was not necessary and that instead saturated fats are to blame for high cholesterol.

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Munkers, on 13 Feb 2015 - 12:44 PM, said:Munkers, on 13 Feb 2015 - 12:44 PM, said:

I was excited to talk with a coworker yesterday when she told me that her doctor was advising her that her cholesterol problems were related to sugar consumption, not fat. Made me hopeful that conventional wisdom is catching up.

 

I've had several physicians (endocrinologist, nephrologist, and internist) all tell me that my high cholesterol was directly related to biological factors and carbohydrate/simple sugar ingestion, as well as low activity levels keeping them all high. As a vegan at the time, they all knew that I had ZERO dietary consumption of cholesterol to be causing elevated triglycerides, LDL, and total cholesterol. So the knowledge is out there, perhaps we just need to find the right practitioners who hold that knowledge.

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2 minutes ago, miniAMP said:

When writing the whole 30, were medical professionals consulted?

     

Both Dallas and Melissa are Certified Sports Nutritionists among other certifications.  In It Starts With Food, there are many resources and sources at the back of the book.

There is nothing 'medical' about this way of eating.  It's an elimination program meant to remove the most common inflammatory foods for 30 days and then bring them back one at at time in order to test how they suit each individual person's system.  If you have medical issues we always recommend consulting your doctor before starting a new way of eating.  

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Hi @miniAMP - Melissa Hartwig is a certified sports nutritionist and Dallas Hartwig is a functional medical practitioner and a certified sports nutritionist. The research in "It Starts with Food", the first book and where the science of the program is founded, has all the references notated so you are free to review the studies and data that they used in writing the book.

As far as the Whole30 program itself, it's a 30-day elimination program and as with all programs of this nature, you are encouraged to seek your own medical professional's opinion prior to commencing. 

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