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Shannon Griffiths

Storing Hard Boiled Eggs

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I boil a dozen or 18 eggs per week. Then I put them (unpeeled) back in the carton and write BOILED on the carton in big letters.

 

On the days I take eggs to work with me, I peel and rinse them, put them in a small container, sprinkle them with salt, and add them to the four hundred thousand things I have to get out the door in the morning.

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Might be common knowledge, but you can spin an egg to tell if it's hard-boiled or not: give it a fast spin like a top ... raw eggs will stay wobbly, while hard-boiled ones will spin nice and even!

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I've done it both ways - stored them in the shell and pre-peeled them and stored them in a baggie. Pros and cons to both (which are nothing more than minor inconveniences). In the shell - you actually have to peel them (which is a pain in the you know what if you're running late). Out of the shell they get a little misshapen, but they're all ready to go. I've never had one go bad and I've stored them for about 5 days before they're all eaten.

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Ready peeled boiled eggs in a bag? Really? I must've lead a very sheltered life...!!  :o  :blink: 

Any top tips for getting the shell off without making a proper mess of the egg...? 

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Have you ever struggled to peel a hard boiled egg by hand? If so, today is your lucky day.

In this viral video, uploaded by YouTube’s MicahMedia, learn how to peel a boiled egg with nothing more than some water, a glass, and some vigorous shaking -- all in under 20 seconds.

Just pop that egg into a glass, add some water...

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Thanks - I've seen the video on FB a few times but the comments as to it's success are always mixed.... Must actually give it a go one of these days!!  B)

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I have found that steaming eggs works for me when it comes to peeling cleanly. I bring an inch or so of water to a boil in a pot or large skillet and put in a metal steamer thingy and add my eggs when the water is at a rolling boil. Clap on the lid and let boil for 9 minutes for soft yolks--fully cooked whites, or 10 minutes for more standard, more well done egg yolks. Soft boiled eggs done perfectly at 6 minutes. Rinse under cold water or ice water plunge and wait about 5 minutes or so and peel. I have had it work perfectly with eggs with a tad bit of age on them as well as newly purchased eggs. 

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I have found that steaming eggs works for me when it comes to peeling cleanly. I bring an inch or so of water to a boil in a pot or large skillet and put in a metal steamer thingy and add my eggs when the water is at a rolling boil. Clap on the lid and let boil for 9 minutes for soft yolks--fully cooked whites, or 10 minutes for more standard, more well done egg yolks. Soft boiled eggs done perfectly at 6 minutes. Rinse under cold water or ice water plunge and wait about 5 minutes or so and peel. I have had it work perfectly with eggs with a tad bit of age on them as well as newly purchased eggs. 

Steaming is my preferred method as well! I let the eggs sit on the counter for 10 minutes or so before steaming (seems to reduce the number of cracked shells while steaming), and I always let them cool completely in an ice water bath. If they're still being little buggers (I think some eggs just have bad attitudes about being eaten) I'll crack the shell and roll it, then re-submerge in the ice water for a few minutes and the shell will usually come off pretty easily. I usually buy eggs from a farmer so I get a mix of white, tan and brown (and an occasional green one). I have no scientific studies to back this, but it always seems like the brown ones peel the easiest, and the green ones have the most attitude. Has anyone else noticed anything like this?

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I tried the egg in a glass of water thing last night. I didn't have 100% success but it did smash up the shell pretty good so that it came off more easily than normal. I'll maybe give the steaming a go at the weekend when I get my steamer out to do a batch of steamed greens...

My eggs are nearly always tan/brown so can't compare to white or green.

This is a batch from a few weeks back - spot the odd one out!  :D (It was a double yolker BTW!!)

eggs.jpg

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All the Boiled Egg Tricks I've learned:

 

Boil eggs that are older. Buy more eggs than you need and boil the last ones that have been sitting in the fridge for at least a week.

Boil your water BEFORE putting the eggs in.

Keep them at a LOW boil, just bubbling a little, to avoid rubbery eggs.

Total cook time 10 minutes.

As they cook, fill a bowl with ice cubes and water.

Drain them and put the eggs in the ice water, leave them in for 5 - 10 minutes.

Optional: If peeling, peel under cold running water.

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Use a needle or thumbtack to punch a tiny hole in the fat end of the eggs before boiling. It creates a space beneath the shell. My mom used to have a tool that did this. I had forgotten about it until I read tips for boiling eggs at Nom Nom Paleo website.

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Use a needle or thumbtack to punch a tiny hole in the fat end of the eggs before boiling. It creates a space beneath the shell. My mom used to have a tool that did this. I had forgotten about it until I read tips for boiling eggs at Nom Nom Paleo website.

Oh wow #TBT My Granny used to have ones of those!! I'd forgotten all about it - must get googling.....  B)

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