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That should be put into context though.  They're not saying that it's ok to eat the conventional burger with a bun, cheese, and French fries.  Or to say "well, I'm just going to continue eating my snacks every day."  They're saying to commit to the rules, and then do the BEST that you can. 

 

Timeshifter, in my first W30, I used lemon juice in my homemade mayo.  I don't remember what day it was, but a day or two after I made the mayo, I realized I hadn't read the label carefully enough (I DID read the label, but didn't have my reading glasses with me at the time).  My lemon juice had sulfites in it.  Now, for me, making homemade mayo was already a big accomplishment.  I'd been ROCKING the program so far, and I also knew that, for ME, if I told myself I had to re-start at that time, I'd stop completely.  So I threw away the rest of the mayo, stopped using the lemon juice, and carried on.  In other words, I'd made a mistake, but I didn't willfully continue to eat the mayo after I knew about.

 

I'm not trying to sound like a hard ass....really.  But Melissa and Dallas are right on when they talk about the "small concessions."  Having it in your head to do the absolute best you can, with "black and white" goals, makes it easier for you in the long run.  You don't have to debate or question every decision because you made it ONCE at the beginning of the 30 days.  That doesn't mean perfect, but that your INTENTION is to be perfect...and then, if you find that you've made a mistake, well, it was a mistake.  Decide what to do and move on.  But if you know BEFORE you eat something that it's not allowed, then don't eat it.

 

I'm on D18...believe me, when I type these things, I'm typing them to MYSELF as much, if not more, than to anyone else.  LOL  That stupid little voice that says "You know, you plan to eat this way for the rest of your life...so what would it hurt to have ONE glass of sweet tea at dinner tonight?"     The hurt is that, for 30 days, I've committed to staying 100%.  After the 30 days, I can modify to suit my long-term goals, allow some small treats, etc...but then, I'll be eating in a W30 "style" vs "DOING" W30 for 30 days.

 

There are many reasons why you should commit fully to the program’s guidelines and rules—all of the rules. (We’re talking to you, scale addicts.) But that doesn’t mean you have to pressure yourself into the most perfect Whole30 ever. Here’s what we mean. The rules are the rules. No grains. No dairy. No weighing yourself. No SWYPO. But we also offer helpful suggestions to make the program as easy as possible, and help you maximize your results. In our free Meal Planning Template, we recommend you eat three meals a day and minimize snacking. In our Good Meat Guide, we encourage you to look for animal protein sources raised in their natural environments, and fed their natural diets. In our Pantry Stocking Guide, we talk about finding pantry items with as few additives as possible.

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I love your encouraging tone. One note on this philosophy, you really need 30 days in a row without soy, legumes, grains, dairy in order to know for sure how it affects you. So not starting over can work, as long as you extend your Whole30 to ensure you have 30 days squeaky clean.

 

Keep up the good work!

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I also welcomed sugar back with open arms after my first Whole30 and found that the digestive distress, crappy sleep, nightmares, lack of energy etc from eating it was SO not worth it.

 

Interestingly, my benchmark for what is "too much" has changed considerably.  I had two cadbury creme eggs in the last two weeks and pre-Whole30 that would have been a drop in the bucket for the crap I was eating.  Now, those 2 creme eggs, long gone, are still sitting on the "had too much lately" bar stopping me from even considering having a non-Whole30 "treat".  

 

You might be surprised at what you do and don't want as things progress.  :)

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I just posted about this under the "starting for lent" thread.  For me, after the first W30, I didn't notice any significant changes after "embracing" sugar again.  At least, not immediately.  It took about 3 months before I said "You know, I felt a bit better on W30, time to try it again."  But even then, it was the snugness of my pants and not anything health-related that was the biggest push to do another W30.

 

I kind of wish I would notice a big change.  :\  Runnergirl, I never really noticed Tiger Blood on the first W30, can't say I've had it yet with this one, either (day 22)...so nothing to go away.

 

Ladyshanny, I think it might have something to do with what is "normal" for me. I'm not saying I have good eating habits.  I don't.  I tend to not eat during the day and then want to eat late evening.  I don't normally eat enough healthy food at all.  But a serious snack attack might be a granola bar, or a few tortilla chips with salsa, a homemade brownie if we have them...so not health food in any form or fashion, but not crazy amounts of food either.  I've never been able to eat a Cadbury Egg (too sweet), don't buy pre-made baked goods (those preservatives are ICKY!), so even though I'm eating processed sugar, and flour, brownies will be eggs, butter, sugar, flour, cocoa, vanilla, salt and baking powder...that's it.

 

I'm just whining.  Sorry!  It's been a busy week, I know I haven't been eating enough, but I'm trying...and if it's choice between eating enough and/or staying compliant, I'm staying compliant.

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I just posted about this under the "starting for lent" thread.  For me, after the first W30, I didn't notice any significant changes after "embracing" sugar again.  At least, not immediately.  It took about 3 months before I said "You know, I felt a bit better on W30, time to try it again."  But even then, it was the snugness of my pants and not anything health-related that was the biggest push to do another W30.

 

I kind of wish I would notice a big change.  :\  Runnergirl, I never really noticed Tiger Blood on the first W30, can't say I've had it yet with this one, either (day 22)...so nothing to go away.

 

Ladyshanny, I think it might have something to do with what is "normal" for me. I'm not saying I have good eating habits.  I don't.  I tend to not eat during the day and then want to eat late evening.  I don't normally eat enough healthy food at all.  But a serious snack attack might be a granola bar, or a few tortilla chips with salsa, a homemade brownie if we have them...so not health food in any form or fashion, but not crazy amounts of food either.  I've never been able to eat a Cadbury Egg (too sweet), don't buy pre-made baked goods (those preservatives are ICKY!), so even though I'm eating processed sugar, and flour, brownies will be eggs, butter, sugar, flour, cocoa, vanilla, salt and baking powder...that's it.

 

I'm just whining.  Sorry!  It's been a busy week, I know I haven't been eating enough, but I'm trying...and if it's choice between eating enough and/or staying compliant, I'm staying compliant.

You're a straight up, no nonsense sort from what I can see of your posts, so I'm going to post a straight up, no nonsense question.  

 

Why aren't you eating enough? Are you unprepared? Do you have certain food or texture aversions? Do you not believe that you deserve to be nourished with healthy, whole foods in a regular interval? 

 

Your desire to not eat all day and then eat at night is a high sign that your hormones are out of whack.  Simply by eating at regular intervals throughout the day, starting within an hour of waking, you can correct that and then the night time snack attacks are manageable...if they even exist.   :)

 

Edited to add: the reason you might not have seen a huge difference at the end of your Whole30 more than likely relates to this as well.

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Ladyshanny, I do eat 3 meals when on W30 (and the first within an hour of waking up).  I don't eat regularly when NOT on W30, and yes, I'm pretty sure that my hormones are out of whack. ;)  As for why I'm not eating enough...that's kind of complicated.  I had Lapband surgery in 2006.  The Lapband makes you really slow down, chew well, and not eat too much at one time. Those are habits that work well for weight loss (and for anyone really...eating slowing is a GOOD thing) and I did great with it for about 6 yrs (hit my goal weight and maintained).  Then I started having some complications, had the band removed and converted to a sleeve.  The sleeve is essentially taking the stomach and removing a portion of it...so stomach capacity is about 1/4-1/3 of normal.  So that still limits the quantity I can eat at one time.

 

It also means I rarely have serious hunger signals.  I DO get hungry...but it's not as reliable perhaps as someone without the sleeve.  And when I am hungry, I fill up fast.

 

Combine that with a lifetime of fighting my weight and I just don't care for food much of the time.  That's part of why, I think, I was successful with the band.  Once those hunger signals were turned off a bit, I could "indulge" in not eating much.

 

Then, add in that I've never really enjoyed the whole process of cooking.  And it's very easy for me to get really annoyed with the whole process...it's very toddler/temper tantrum-ish, but I get tired of thinking about food at all.

 

So I don't eat enough because 1) my biology now limits how much I can eat at one sitting and 2) I get tired of trying to make sure that I do eat. 

 

Today is a classic example.  Went to work out with my son this morning.  He fixed sausage and eggs.  I really like my sausage and eggs, but early in the morning...it's iffy.  So I ate maybe 3/4 c of food.  Worked out, met hubby for lunch.  Had 1/2 of a 6 oz sirloin, and 1/2 a plain potato.  Even if the restaurant had had more compliant options, I couldn't eat more at the time.  Ran some more errands, came home, had a few minutes to do some work, had about 20 minutes to grab something to eat, ate some homemade chicken salad...and that was almost too much (gave myself the hiccups...a sure sign that I'd hit my "full mark").

 

And that's it.  Logically, I know it wasn't nearly enough food for what I've done today.  But...I'm not hungry. I could make myself have a compliant snack right now to eat more, but I just don't want anything.

 

And in some ways, when I do start feeling more upbeat and energetic, I get even busier, so eating meals tends to take even more of a backseat.  All that, for me, means that eating is something I sometimes have to MAKE myself do...and I'm better at it some days than others.

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Hi Cinagain,

 

Thanks so much for sharing this!  I'm glad to hear that you are following the guidelines while on your Whole30 and you may find that this "training" every time you do 30 days ultimately will change your relationship with foods and lead to less tantrums and more regular eating.

 

I'm curious, can someone who has had these surgeries have them reversed? You said your lap band was removed, did you replace it with the sleeve because you had to or because you want to? I'm just curious, forgive me if that question is too personal.

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It's not too personal!  I like to share my experiences in case they help someone else at some point.  The lapband is removable (one reason I chose that surgery initially) and is *supposed* to last a lifetime.  But, unfortunately, I hear more and more stories of people having problems with them long term...scar tissue built up around the band, for example.  As I started having problems with mine, the weight started creeping up.  I was really worried that, if I removed the band without doing something else, I'd be back to my original weight in very little time.  That wasn't an option for me, so I chose to convert to the sleeve.

The sleeve is NOT reversible...a portion of the stomach is actually removed during the surgery.  Unlike bypass, however, nothing is re-routed so there's no malabsorption/malnourishment issues that can often be found with bypass surgeries. 

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It's not too personal!  I like to share my experiences in case they help someone else at some point.  The lapband is removable (one reason I chose that surgery initially) and is *supposed* to last a lifetime.  But, unfortunately, I hear more and more stories of people having problems with them long term...scar tissue built up around the band, for example.  As I started having problems with mine, the weight started creeping up.  I was really worried that, if I removed the band without doing something else, I'd be back to my original weight in very little time.  That wasn't an option for me, so I chose to convert to the sleeve.

The sleeve is NOT reversible...a portion of the stomach is actually removed during the surgery.  Unlike bypass, however, nothing is re-routed so there's no malabsorption/malnourishment issues that can often be found with bypass surgeries. 

I have 3 relatives who've opted for WLS (gastric bypass) over 10 years ago.  A Whole 30 is a food reset but the mind reset is the most valuable part of the process.   What causes cravings in general and in particular is unique to every person.

 

A Whole 30 is 30 days of renewal, reassessment and a reassertion of goals...mental and physical.  A Whole 30 is the best possible effort we can do to restart the lifestyle we all want for ourselves going forward.  I'm glad you've found the Whole 30....me, too.

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I'm glad I found it, too.  I wonder how things might have been different if I could have found it in 2005?  There's speculation that people who struggle with obesity (aside from the quality/quantity of what we eat) feel hunger more strongly than people who don't struggle with their weight.  There's more of a "drive" to eat, less satiety felt from a meal, etc. I think some of that would be impacted by eating differently (more whole foods, more fat, etc), but I do think there's a strong genetic component there that influences what is "normal" for our bodies.

Before my Lapband, I remember never really feeling full.  Never feeling that "ok, you've had enough" signal.  Or if I did reach it, it was quickly gone...so my life revolved around trying NOT to eat, because if I ate for satiety, I quickly gained weight.  It was *amazing* that, after the Lapband, I could NOT think about food for long periods of time.  Eat a small steak and some veggies and truly feel satisfied for several hours. 

 

So for me, part of the struggle with W30 is that I truly do NOT want to spend time focusing on food.  I know it's supposed to be nourishing your body, but in a very real way, it feels like all those years of struggling with one diet after another...expect with this one, I'm making myself eat vs not eating.  LOL  I don't want my life to revolve around what compliant foods are available.  So for me, W30 as a lifestyle (and I know it's not really meant to be) isn't really an option right now.  I'll hopefully continue to do *better*...and will do another W30 at some point, but 30 days at a time is about the limit of my patience.

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I agree with everything you've said.  There are so many variables. I think alot of it happens from Day 1 of our existence.  What our mothers ate or snacked constantly on before we were born...that and our genetics.  I blame my mother for everything.  :D   I blame my family genetics for the rest. :lol: Then I give my mother a guilt trip and tell her that my grandparents caused everything.... :lol:  Think about those growing up during the Great Depression and periods of lack and starvation.  I have alot of that in my family. What did that do to the genes? I'd like to know all of the whys but my time is better spent on dealing with the present than the past apparently. There are people with leaky guts and leaky shut-off valves.  No matter how tight they turn off their stomach valve, they cannot ever get enough to eat.  You've hit the nail on the head.   The half has not been told and maybe science will figure out how to fix the valves without knives, nuts and bolts.

 

Until then, we have the Whole 30 to reset our heads and our forum friends to keep us accountable to one another.   

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