Self Sabotage


Becky1979

Recommended Posts

I'm about to start my third Whole 30 and am approaching it with mixed feelings.  My previous 2 were wonderful experiences but afterwards on both occasions I got back into bad habits very quickly and lost many of the benefits I had gained.

 

It's like when I get to the point of optimum health and appearance, there's something in my brain that doesn't like it and drives me to self sabotage so that it slips away again.  I'm scared because I really, really don't want this to happen a third time - but I don't know why it's happening in the first place and so I don't know how to stop it.

 

Has anyone else had this experience?  And if so, how have you managed it?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Becky, you're not alone.  Much has been written on this subject by Melissa and Dallas.  They have a new guide for Off-Roading.  There's an older one, too.

 

http://whole9life.com/2011/04/whole9s-guide-to-nutritional-off-roading/

 

http://whole30.com/downloads/off-roading.pdf

 

These are great resources for making smarter choices after a Whole 30.   I believe in the Slow Roll Reintro protocol.

It's a solid plan for creating stability after a Whole 30.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you do reintroductions? Committing to that process may help.

Interesting question.  I did - and what I learned from the process was that none of the foods that W30 excludes have an adverse effect on their own.  What causes me problems is the cumulative effect of eating all those foods, every day.  A good lesson to learn, but it makes the mentality of "oh a bread roll with dinner won't hurt" VERY easy to slip into.  Because a bread roll with dinner won't hurt, but that turns into a bread roll and a glass of wine and a chocolate dessert, and so begins the self sabotage.  It's the scenario where I allow myself a small slip up and then it just snowballs into being in bad habits every meal, every day.  The thing is that I don't really even want these foods half the time - hence my feelings that there is something in my brain that can't cope with or doesn't like me feeling healthy and looking good.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Becky, you're not alone.  Much has been written on this subject by Melissa and Dallas.  They have a new guide for Off-Roading.  There's an older one, too.

 

http://whole9life.com/2011/04/whole9s-guide-to-nutritional-off-roading/

 

http://whole30.com/downloads/off-roading.pdf

 

These are great resources for making smarter choices after a Whole 30.   I believe in the Slow Roll Reintro protocol.

It's a solid plan for creating stability after a Whole 30.

Thanks Meadow, it does help to know I'm not alone!

 

I LOVE these guides to off-roading and actually familiarised myself with them before my first W30.  The problem is that when my brain starts playing tricks on me I forget the guides even exist.  Even if I do ask myself "will it be worth it" sometimes the answer is "right now I don't even care".  That's what I want to move away from.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Meadow, it does help to know I'm not alone!

 

I LOVE these guides to off-roading and actually familiarised myself with them before my first W30.  The problem is that when my brain starts playing tricks on me I forget the guides even exist.  Even if I do ask myself "will it be worth it" sometimes the answer is "right now I don't even care".  That's what I want to move away from.

 

What I cannot moderate - I must eliminate.

 

I can look at sugary packaged anything and say  "What are you going to do for me?   NOTHING."

 

There is nothing about sugar going forward that will moderate blood sugars and keep Diabetes from knocking at my door again.  I've already reached that crossroads.  I've set my boundaries.  It shouldn't take a health crisis to reach that point but it's human nature to wait until one does before the changes are made.

 

Maybe this will help you....binge eaters earlier in life are at high risk for diabetes later in life.  The pancreas can only handle so much thrill eating before it pushes back.  Better to get off that merry-go-round now than deal with it later.

 

It's seldom that other peoples health issues move us until it's at our own door.  

 

  •  
  • Moderators
  • w9team.png
  • 688 posts
  • LocationSan Francisco

Posted 10 May 2012 - 02:28 PM

Hey - click through to my profile and read my story. I had a few false starts but I finally got on board when I was diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFL) and my health issues became real and measurable. I hate that it took getting to such a drastic state but all that matters is you take the first step then don't look back! 
  •  
Johnny 

Check out my recipe blog below. Many are Whole30 compliant or easily adapted. All are delicious.

Eating for Idiots

  •  
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

We are the stories we tell ourselves.

 

I have a meaningful series of words I hear inside my head alot.  My own spoken word theme music.  I don't speak these words outloud.  They're more powerful to me if I don't.  They are the silent soundtracks running in the background.

 

These words just pop into my head. They're the same voice that tells me to paint the stepping stones that lead to my house.  I don't choose the words deliberately.

 

We are the stories we tell ourselves.  If you've told yourself so long that you suck at math...that could be a big fabrication.  I don't like math becomes I suck at math.  Retelling these stories to ourself is defeating.

 

Be Present.  Tell yourself a new story.   Take delight that you have a brand new song and shiny soundtrack running that belongs only to you.   No one can take it from you.   It makes you smile when someone makes a snarky comment or tries to knock you off your WINNING game.   It keeps self-sabotage from ruining your progress.   Tell yourself a new story.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Administrators

 The thing is that I don't really even want these foods half the time - hence my feelings that there is something in my brain that can't cope with or doesn't like me feeling healthy and looking good.

This is very powerful to be aware of.  It means that you can do some digging into yourself in your quiet moments and try to find what these barriers are.  Is it an issue of not feeling worthy? Thinking you can't be loved so you keep the barrier in place so all the blame gets tossed on that.  Not wanting to be looked at or having to deal with affection?  These might not be you (they were/are me) but if you can recognize that your brain might in fact be trying to sabotage you, you can work on figuring out why.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.