Grinding Meat


Rebe_J

Recommended Posts

Today I ground up about two pounds of lean pork loin chops and made breakfast sausage patties. No shrinkage, and the flavor was much better than with commercially ground pork (with questionable provenance). Bonus: a savings of nearly $2 per pound.

 

I have had a Kitchen Aid stand mixer for years, and recently pulled it out of deep storage to use to mix up ground meat for meatballs, etc. It finally dawned on me that I could use a grinder attachment and grind my own meat. It took a bit of time, but the quality of the final product makes it worth the effort. Plus...it was fun.

 

Next time--chicken. I can de-bone a chicken thigh pretty quickly now--thanks to step-by-step instructions at Nomnompaleo.com. And the bones make the best broth.

 

I welcome any other suggestions for using my new kitchen gadget.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There's no comparison to better tasting pork, beef, bison.....when you grind your own.   You're doing great.   The reason burger in the store spoils so fast is due to the open air for days on end ...sold from the counter.   The best part about grinding your own is that you are using only one source of the meat.   

 

Commercial burger in your counter and on shelves....one pound might be from 100's instead of just one source.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

 I just commented on the FUN aspect to MeadowLily the other day. I do the exact same thing - KitchenAid mixer ftw! I love love love shoving cubes down the chute, I guess I am easily entertained. ;)

 

 

I have had a Kitchen Aid stand mixer for years, and recently pulled it out of deep storage to use to mix up ground meat for meatballs, etc. It finally dawned on me that I could use a grinder attachment and grind my own meat. It took a bit of time, but the quality of the final product makes it worth the effort. Plus...it was fun.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 I just commented on the FUN aspect to MeadowLily the other day. I do the exact same thing - KitchenAid mixer ftw! I love love love shoving cubes down the chute, I guess I am easily entertained. ;)

I think it's wonderful.   Two women who are actually eating meat and are proactive with the process.  Oooooo, it's great to see this.   I've read so many Whole 30 logs that are only filled with nuts, nut butters and dried fruits and little else...that I'm standing on my head when I see women who really embrace what a Whole 30 is all about.   

You are the ones that I'd expect to hear from when it's Tiger Blood time.  Actually eating proteins of the best quality...this is what catapults you there.  Nuts and dried fruits...nuh huh.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 I just commented on the FUN aspect to MeadowLily the other day. I do the exact same thing - KitchenAid mixer ftw! I love love love shoving cubes down the chute, I guess I am easily entertained. ;)

 

I really find my kitchen time to be therapeutic, as well as entertaining.  When I'm organized, I can get a lot done in a little time--and still find it relaxing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it's wonderful.   Two women who are actually eating meat and are proactive with the process.  Oooooo, it's great to see this.   I've read so many Whole 30 logs that are only filled with nuts, nut butters and dried fruits and little else...that I'm standing on my head when I see women who really embrace what a Whole 30 is all about.   

You are the ones that I expect to hear from when it's Tiger Blood time.  Actually eating proteins of the best quality...this is what catapults you there.  Nuts and dried fruits...nuh huh.

 

It's only Day 5 for me, and I can't believe how GREAT I feel. It's really incredible. I am planning a big weekend of grinding & freezer cooking so future meals can be a snap. Getting ready to rock it straight to Tiger Blood time!

 

Thanks for all your encouragement and insight MeadowLily. Before I started my Whole30 (and got active in the Forums) I'd found one of your posts and printed it out. It's about consistency and awareness, here's a bit of it:

 

 

We are all a work in progress and not perfection.

Go ahead and restart another Whole 30.   Let it be very consistent and gentle.   The old axiom of when we find something that works...just do it until we drive it and ourselves right into the ground,  that's not the answer either.

There is a Whole 30 Zone.    Oh Bliss,   oh joy,   oh happiness found.  It's a peaceful easy feeling similar to releasing endorphins.   I have found that pocket when I stay true to template portions of protein,  vegetables and good dietary fats.

 

This hit me right in my heart. It was exactly what I needed to hear as I shifted into my first Whole30. I'm thankful for you and so many other wise & experienced folks here in the Forum - thank you for sharing your insights.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I love grinding my own meat! I use my food processor right now, since my grinding attachment is packed away. Although it would be good to pick up a second one so I have it available! I have contemplated getting some natural casings and making my own sausage links--its been awhile but I love making my own--because I know what is going in the sausage! 

 

Meadow Lily-- you might get a kick out of this-- we had friends over a couple of weeks ago and the fella is a 'he man' or at least likes to think he is! Well, I was talking about how our local Cash and Carry store has goat and I want to pick some up and he mentioned that Costco had whole goat. I said whole goat? Yea, whole goat. Whole goat? Yea--the whole thing--well it is lamb, but what's the difference. Umm... there is a bit of difference between goat and lamb, but ok.. and he went on to say that it was the whole thing--headless and peeled, but the whole animal. I responded well cool, I know how to break one down, I should go get one. And he reiterated that it was the WHOLE animal, and I said you know, I know how to break down animals, I have done tons of chickens, rabbit, lamb, major cuts of pork, fish, I haven't done any game animals (yet) but I figure I could do just as well with them as domestic meats. I mentioned that I am not one of those people who think that a steak just appears at the meat counter, and dealing with meat doesn't faze me one iota. He really didn't have much to say after that... I mean I am a GIRL shouldn't I be totally grossed out??

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oooooo, you women make me proud.  This should be the the authentic Whole 30 thread where we can have our meat and eat it, too.   The half has not been told what will happen to you if you keep on this way.  The healing...emotional, physical well being.   It's not easy to put into words, you have to experience Tiger Blood for yourselves.  AND you will because you're kickin' it old school.   This is the way they did it back in 2009. Not so long ago, but it does seem like eons ago.

 

It's more than a mental state.  You can't work it up.  It happens naturally. You pull it up from the soles of your feet to the top of your head, you want to dance and laugh, let out a war hoop or two.  Ahhh, heck-a-toot,  I can't wait for it to happen to you!  I'll go Native with you when it does.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd love to hear more about Kickin' it Old School 2009-style! Is that from the earliest test versions of W30? Do tell.

 

Off to the market this morning to buy MEAT. Will report back on finds and grindin'. :-)

 

Cue primal growls!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd love to hear more about Kickin' it Old School 2009-style! Is that from the earliest test versions of W30? Do tell.

 

Off to the market this morning to buy MEAT. Will report back on finds and grindin'. :-)

 

Cue primal growls!

Start cruising the backroads of this forum.   You'll see how our Whole 30 ancestors did this before we came along.   You'll find your golden nuggets of truth.   They kicked it and it wasn't for sissies.     The language was much stronger.   It was good medicine.

 

I need that kind of straight talk.    Go back to the well, the very beginning and creation of Whole 30.  Those posts give me daily encouragement.  The inspiration is just as relevant today as it was then.

 

Those posts are the ones that ring in my ears and in moments of weakness, they bring me right back to the beginning...when all is well with the world.   It will take searching on your part but you won't forget the tenets.  You'll understand the basis for eliminating SWYPO's.   They're not just rules but you'll find the science and thought that went into making this program rock.

 

I have and read the books but I like the backroads.   There's open air and those posts still blow my bangs back.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Grinding Meat.   I absolutely love the title of this thread.   This is where the rubber meets the road.   Getting down to the brass tacks and it's not a daily grind.  It's getting down to the bare bones, enjoying your bone broth, grinding and cooking your meat.   Roasting your beef.   Whole 30 is super, super smart.   

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Start cruising the backroads of this forum.   You'll see how our Whole 30 ancestors did this before we came along.   You'll find your golden nuggets of truth.   They kicked it and it wasn't for sissies.     The language was much stronger.   It was good medicine.

 

I'm looking, but not finding anything older than 2012, and it looks like the Dirty30 thread is actually pretty recent. So if anyone has links for The Good Stuff, let me know.

 

Thanks y'all, and have a GREAT day.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm looking, but not finding anything older than 2012, and it looks like the Dirty30 thread is actually pretty recent. So if anyone has links for The Good Stuff, let me know.

 

Thanks y'all, and have a GREAT day.

http://whole9life.com/9-blog/page/57/

 

Work your way forward.  Follow the yellow brick road.   Take your time, move slowly.  Absorb as you go.

 

Click on read more, then really read all of the comments at the bottom of each blog post.   Nuggets.  Truth. Super smart.  Inspirational.   Epic.   Legendary.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Roasting your beef.   Whole 30 is super, super smart.   

 

Back from the store. Beef and bison. My mouth watered when I looked at the raw steaks. That's a new one for me.

 

Only Day 6. I can't WAIT to see what it's like by Day 16... Day 26... ROAR

Link to post
Share on other sites

http://whole9life.com/9-blog/page/57/

 

Work your way forward.  Follow the yellow brick road.   Take your time, move slowly.  Absorb as you go.

 

Click on read more, then really read all of the comments at the bottom of each blog post.   Nuggets.  Truth. Super smart.  Inspirational.   Epic.   Legendary.  

Thank you. I will read with intention and take time to absorb and ponder.

 

You shine excellence, Ms. ML.

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, so this isn't grinding meat, but it is a meat-prep fail. Hubs caught a bunch of spot prawns yesterday, and handful of which still had their heads on (legs wiggling, eyes akimbo) when he handed them over.

 

I could devein, but I couldn't pop the heads. Hubs had to do it. :-D

 

So... there's my challenge, which I've found is *quite* different from cutting up a quarter of whatever. Next time, I've promised myself that I'll do it, regardless of the EW factor.

 

Anyone else got a Meat Story? I'm lookin' for 'em.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Welll... let's see-- when I was little 6 or so, dad showed me how to kill and clean a rainbow trout--whack them on a rock, cut the head off right behind the head and around the gills, slit the belly and clean them out. He taught me about the same time how to cook them (dredge in cornmeal and into melted butter, serve with a MOUND of sauteed white onions) 

 

When I was going thru my divorce 20 years ago, I was going thru culinary school at the same time and I had a butchering class (hence while handling whole animals really doesn't bother me) and Chef dropped a box with about 20 chickens in it next to me and told me I had to break them all down into the various parts. I got out my boning knife, plopped that first chicken on my cutting board (where the head used to be) told the old girl, this won't hurt a bit, and cut the backbone out. Then proceeded to quarter the bird, do a airline cut on the breasts (take the last 2 joints off and leave the 'drumette' on, and broke apart the legs. Got really good at boning out the birds too. It was great for working out the stress of court proceedings, let me tell you! I got to do charcuterie, learned how to do head cheese, my day on the bone saw was breaking down calves head just for that, broke down rabbits as well as whole lambs. I also broke down 'bucked out' rabbits where I did my internship too, and made lots of pate' with rabbit liver and kidneys as internal garnish. (I was told by the chef where I did my internship that some unscrupulous meat suppliers will sell cats as rabbit since a skinned cat looks like a peeled bunny and that good meat suppliers will leave the kidneys in the bunnies to prove they are bunny--since the kidneys in cats are straight across and those in a bunny are off set? Course he could have been pulling my leg since I was a girl and I took him at his word! And if I am wrong, I stand corrected!! But, kinda reminds me of back in the Middle Ages though, when bakers were accused of cheating their customers with underweight loaves and not using pure flour, the good bakers would give 13 for a dozen instead of 12 to prove they were honest and that their goods met full weight. That's where we get a baker's dozen from :D  OH and when I was in school, all dem bones dem chicken bones (and any other bones we had) all got sent over to soups and stocks class so none of it went to waste. 

 

OK-- a bit overboard, but when I get going on food--kinda hard to stop.  

 

(ETA: to clear up a few thoughts and to remind myself not to try and type after midnight! )

Link to post
Share on other sites

As much as I like to cook, I think I'd like to take a basic butchery class.

 

I don't have a good meat story, but I grew up on a farm in central CA. My grandparents raised nearly all their food, including rabbits. I would help grandpa kill and dress the rabbits, then grandma would cut them up. I can see how someone might think they look like cats.

 

All our meat and poultry was grass-fed or pastured, but we didn't call it that; it was just how we raised our food. And... I had names for all the animals we ate. My husband (city boy) gets skeeved out when I talk about it.  He knows intellectually what happens between the feed lot and the foam tray in the meat department of the supermarket, but he doesn't like to think about it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been hunting and fishing... all of my life.   Moose, Elk, Bison, Deer, Antelope, Sage Grouse, Ducks, Rainbow Trout, Brown Trout, Salmon, Pike, Walleye...and so on.   We're not trophy hunters,  we eat everything we harvest.  Trophy hunting gives me a really big pinch.  I loathe it.  We process and package all of our own meat. We practice good husbandry and give thanks for the life of every animal we've taken.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been hunting and fishing... all of my life.   Moose, Elk, Bison, Deer, Antelope, Sage Grouse, Ducks, Rainbow Trout, Brown Trout, Salmon, Pike, Walleye...and so on.   We're not trophy hunters,  we eat everything we harvest.  Trophy hunting gives me a really big pinch.  I loathe it.  We process and package all of our own meat. We practice good husbandry and give thanks for the life of every animal we've taken.

 

We are trying to do more of this every year. We live in prime fishing area: Ling cod, halibut, salmon, prawns, oysters, crabs (ew, but most people love)... And I'm trying to get the hubs to do more bird hunting. He typically has done duck, but that's not my favorite, so I'm pushing for more goose & pheasant this year. YUM.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.