Protein powder


CatLady711

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I'm wondering if their are any compliant protein powders that I can put into a smoothie. I'm starting boot camp classes at 6am next week, and I need something to give me energy before I go, but I won't have time to sit down and have breakfast, since I'll be leaving for the class around 530 am.

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We really don't recommend protein powders, we want you to eat real food.  If you do some prep in advance, having a couple hard boiled eggs before you go doesn't take any longer than shaking powder into water.  ;)

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During a Whole30, we don't want you drinking your food, so smoothies are an awful choice. Eat a boiled egg before your workout. Eat half a can of tuna. 

 

Liquid food digests faster than solid foods, so interferes with proper satiety signals. Also smoothies typically include more fruit sugar than you should consume. If it were up to me, all protein powder would be classified as processed food. It is. However, I hear it is possible to find egg white protein powder that meets Whole30 criteria. 

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Thanks for the info, I didn't even think of the fact that Drinking my food would make a different. I'll keep a couple hard boiled eggs in the fridge for the morning I go. I planned on eating a full breakfast after the boot camp and before I go to class, any suggestions on good post workout breakfast's that don't involve eggs, since I'll be eating them before my workout.

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Thanks for the info, I didn't even think of the fact that Drinking my food would make a different. I'll keep a couple hard boiled eggs in the fridge for the morning I go. I planned on eating a full breakfast after the boot camp and before I go to class, any suggestions on good post workout breakfast's that don't involve eggs, since I'll be eating them before my workout.

You don't want eggs anyway, post workout, as the post wo recommendation is protein and optional carb, no fat. (Yolks are a fat.) Popular options are chicken or tuna and sweet potato. Browse the Whole30 for athletes forum for other ideas.

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well, i dont know if this is compliant or not, but i used to use hemp protein, it has as much protein in it as other protein powders, but its much more natural, and only has one ingredient in it, which is hemp. it's also high in iron, potassium, magnesium, and dietary fiber. i used to just mix it with a glass of water, or blend it with some coconut milk and a banana.

http://navitasnaturals.com/product/453/Hemp-Protein-Powder.html

 

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Hemp protein powder would not be compliant on a Whole30, sorry!

um, sorry but I think hemp (plain hemp, not with anything added) falls into the same category as chia, meaning: yeah you can have it, but we don't recommend it. The hemp powder has several "not recommended" strikes against it. It encourages drinking rather than eating food but not explicitly forbidden.

 

For people considering it, though: wouldn't you want to go for something we actually recommend you consume, not just skirt the edges of compliance with something that tastes like sawdust?

 

Hemp Seeds: Yes

See chia and flax.

Chia: Yes

These “seeds” aren’t the same botanical family of seeds that we eliminate with grains and legumes, so that makes them fine to eat during your Whole30.

Tip: Chia isn’t likely to cause you any serious trouble, but it’s not the omega-3 super-food it’s made out to be, either. We explain why in It Starts With Food, but in summary, chia should be treated like any other nut and consumed in limited quantities.

- See more at: http://whole30.com/2013/06/the-official-can-i-have-guide-to-the-whole30/#sthash.cKkdH1de.dpuf

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whats wrong with omega 3's?

There's nothing wrong with omega-3's, you actually need them. You can get them from fatty fish like salmon, fish oil, or some eggs and probably other stuff I can't think of right now. What they're saying in the quote above is that chia is not some amazing source of omega-3 like some reports made it out to be. It's okay to have it, but don't think that it's some kind of miracle food that you should eat tons and tons of, just treat it like any other seed.

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Ahh I see. What about extra virgin olive oil? Omega 3s in that

 

extra virgin olive oil is ok.

 

The reason hemp and chia are not great, is that although they are a source of omega 3 it is counteracted by the phytic acid and anti-nutrients in the seed.

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  • 1 month later...

My wife and I just started Whole30 yesterday and have done a great job of preparing and planning our meals.  I know liquid food is NOT encouraged, but did see that the Whole30 101 page says 100% egg white protein is technically acceptable.  I am not looking at this for a meal replacement.  I just work out a lot and it is very intensive and want a post workout protein option.  Prior to the Whole30 I was taking a protein shake after my workouts and I don’t want to lose progress by not continuing now that I am on Whole30.

 

Does anyone have a list of the compliant, 100% egg white protein powders? 

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My wife and I just started Whole30 yesterday and have done a great job of preparing and planning our meals.  I know liquid food is NOT encouraged, but did see that the Whole30 101 page says 100% egg white protein is technically acceptable.  I am not looking at this for a meal replacement.  I just work out a lot and it is very intensive and want a post workout protein option.  Prior to the Whole30 I was taking a protein shake after my workouts and I don’t want to lose progress by not continuing now that I am on Whole30.

 

Does anyone have a list of the compliant, 100% egg white protein powders? 

 

The Whole30 recommendation is to take in actual food post workout--specifically starchy vegetables and lean protein. I would suggest at least trying those recommendations for 30 days before deciding to do something different.

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At the beginning of the week, grill several chicken breasts and roast a few sweet potatoes and/or beets. Pack in individual containers to grab out of the fridge when you go work out. Easy.

 

Even easier: Buy a compliant rotisserie chicken, strip the meat and pack in baggies. Buy canned sweet potatoes and portion out into tupperware containters. Take to the gym.

 

Don't forget your fork!

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At the beginning of the week, grill several chicken breasts and roast a few sweet potatoes and/or beets. Pack in individual containers to grab out of the fridge when you go work out. Easy.

 

Even easier: Buy a compliant rotisserie chicken, strip the meat and pack in baggies. Buy canned sweet potatoes and portion out into tupperware containters. Take to the gym.

 

Don't forget your fork!

 

Thank you for the response.  I am not intentionally trying to do something different.  I just have a routine for working out and want to stick to that.  I work out 4:30pm-5:30pm and on my way home have a protein shake within 15 minutes of the workout.  Then when I get home I cook dinner with my wife and we eat together.  Eating actual food like the lean protein and starchy vegetables immediately post workout will make it so I won’t eat dinner until very late, which I do not want to do right before I go to bed.  So that’s my dilemma and the reason I asked the question.  Simply put I am not going to eat a meal after I work out in order to get the protein I want and was wondering if there is a list of the acceptable proteins.  If there is not, that's fine I will do some research.  I was just hoping there was so I can save myself some time.

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Did you read the book?  It states you should avoid smoothies and it also states no to protein powders.

Yes Power98Dan, I did read the book.  And I also have been checking everything against the website.  If you see my attached screen shot it states...

 

"However, protein powder from approved ingredients like crickets (in Chapul bars) or 100% egg white are allowed on the Whole30, provided they contain no sweeteners. As always, though, liquid food is still not encouraged. Got it?"

post-74853-0-32813900-1437408985_thumb.p

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I'd skip the postWO shake and just have a big enough dinner. The window for protein synthesis is larger than is typically bandied about:

One of many possible examples involving a 60-minute resistance training bout could have up to 90-minute feeding windows on both sides of the bout, given central placement between the meals.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3577439/
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  • 3 weeks later...

 

http://www.nowfoods.com/EggWhite-Protein-1-2-LBS.htm

The chocolate and vanilla have ingredients I'd stay away from, but the plain seems compliant. Wonder how it tastes, though. Not sure what we could add to help. Unsweetened cocoa powder?

 

Compliant yes, but <confused> why would you not just eat the eggs?

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I haven't read the whole book yet, but I am uncertain as to the recommendation of starchy veggies? Should that be only Post Workout? I see some dinners with sweet potato etc? Aren't we supposed to limit starchies (tubers, winter squash)?

 

What is considered intese exercise to warrant a pre-post meal? I feel my training may be so 'lame' at the get go that I don't know if I deserve the extra meal and don't want to over consume.

 

I'm a "recovering" fitness competitor, so bear with me on the OCD, plz. :mellow:

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