Research that goes against the grain


Liz Powell

Recommended Posts

Hi all!

I'm in a Nutrition Science class which is currently required for a culinary program I'm in.  The instructor is really pushing that the FDA recommendations for diet are THE BEST.  I know that there are plenty of scholarly articles out that which challenge these assumptions so I'm asking for your help.  Can you help me open up a debate on this topic?  I don't need to convince the whole class that paleo is the best, I just want to discuss that there are good reasons to examine the FDA guidelines on My Plate.  Thanks in advance!!

 

Liz

 

(I'd like to keep this to research, preferably in peer reviewed journals, so that I can present the strongest case)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I recommend reading 'It Starts With Food' first and the forum is filled with posts that you can research. Google Whole 30 with any question you have.   You'll usually find an answer....Whole 30 or Whole 9.  Here's an example:   Read the link below and all of the comments by Melissa and Dallas.   I googled Whole 30  SAD recommendations.   

 

http://whole30.com/2013/06/the-official-can-i-have-guide-to-the-whole30/

 

 

 

 

 

Melissa @ Whole9 says

 

 

10 June, 2013 at 8:54 am

We have more than 400 scientific references in the back of our New York Times bestselling book, It Starts With Food. (And that’s just our book – Robb Wolf and Loren Cordain have plenty of back-up too.) Happy reading!

NKSL: We’ve created a program that works amazingly, stunningly well for the vast majority of the 100,000+ people who have tried it, in part because we pay such close attention to the psychological impact of our food choices. We’re comfortable with the rules we’ve created.

Melissa

- See more at: http://whole30.com/2013/06/the-official-can-i-have-guide-to-the-whole30/#sthash.lTEr1kC8.dpuf

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's all here....just google.

 

 

Back to the Start

Let’s go back to 2009. I had been researching nutrition in the context of evolutionary biology for two years, and had learned a great deal about food, our immune system, our digestive tract, and our psychological response to food. I’d been changing my day-to-day eating habits towards a Paleo-ish template, but I still had some minor health issues. At that time, I was playing competitive volleyball and experimenting with Olympic weightlifting to improve my sport performance. I was lean and muscular and… my shoulder hurt all the time. I had some pretty significant inflammation, and I couldn’t even sleep on my left side. I tried resting it, icing it, physical therapy (I myself have been a licensed PT since 2001), and eating ibuprofen like candy (I didn’t know yet that non-steroidal drugs increased gut permeability and actually slowed healing of connective tissues). I went so far as to get cortisone injections in my shoulder before playing at USVBA Nationals just so I could continue to function. Nothing worked.

 

After coming across a research paper that discussed the immunology of certain proteins found in food, and something clicked. I thought, “If food components can directly cause inflammation in certain populations (like people with autoimmune disease), I wonder whether it could also be contributing to the chronic inflammation in my shoulder.” Unbeknownst to me at the time, that was the thought that ultimately led us to create and share the Whole30 program.

 

I experimented with some dietary changes (eliminating the large amount of beans and grains that I was eating for a few weeks). And… magic. My shoulder stopped hurting altogether, and I’ve had zero shoulder pain since then. Incredible, I thought.

 

Fast forward a couple years, and Melissa and I were doing some weightlifting training at a gym in Boston, and I sprung the idea of a super-strict, no-cheats elimination diet (based on the Paleo template outlined by our friend Robb Wolf) on Melissa when she was exhausted (and probably cognitively compromised). She agreed, and that was the prototype for the Whole30, even though we weren’t calling it that back then.

 

- See more at: http://whole30.com/2015/03/dallas-whole30/#sthash.VvdoqV7n.dpuf

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all!

I'm in a Nutrition Science class which is currently required for a culinary program I'm in.  The instructor is really pushing that the FDA recommendations for diet are THE BEST.  I know that there are plenty of scholarly articles out that which challenge these assumptions so I'm asking for your help.  Can you help me open up a debate on this topic?  I don't need to convince the whole class that paleo is the best, I just want to discuss that there are good reasons to examine the FDA guidelines on My Plate.  Thanks in advance!!

 

Liz

 

(I'd like to keep this to research, preferably in peer reviewed journals, so that I can present the strongest case)

WHOLE30: A LEARNING TOOL, NOT A LIFESTYLE

 

18 May, 2015

From Dallas Hartwig, Whole30 co-creator, professional Science-English translator, motorcycle aficionado, and part-time hooligan.

You already know the Whole30 is not a diet. It’s not like Atkins or Weight Watchers, and despite its similarities in terms of food selection, the Whole30 is not the same as being “on a Paleo diet.” As we’ve explained, you have to change the framework for how you think about this experience and not try to fit the Whole30 into the “diet” box.

 

But here’s the thing: the Whole30 program itself is also not a lifestyle. It can and should open the door to a new lifestyle, but our specific rules are not intended to be a way of eating long term, nor is it a benchmark to live up to or a lifetime of “perfect” to be obtained.

In fact, eventually, we hope you won’t need the Whole30 at all… because the Whole30 is a plan designed to make itself obsolete as quickly as possible.

 

Find Your New Normal

- See more at: http://whole30.com/2015/05/whole30-learning-tool/#sthash.nF7tn0NE.dpuf

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...

I know this is late, but if you ever needed this for the future, a great article on the just the concept of why My plate has problems is this one: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthy-eating-plate-vs-usda-myplate/

 

It talks about the real-life facts of how  recommendations for My plate were decided on. Like, for example, some things that were altered away from scientifically based nutritional science due to political and commercial pressures. It's good reading for anyone who is, well, really ignorant about how this sort of thing works in real life, which it sounds like the professor may be.

 

It doesn't challenge some of the basic concepts of nutrition, but it can open the door for someone to take a step back and start to reconsider 'facts' from the FDA and re-examine them, you know? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.