How many eggs is too many eggs?


abbyn

Recommended Posts

I seem to have the opposite problem of many people on here: I love (and can tolerate!) eggs. They're cheap, filling and practically convenience food. Now that I've finally mastered mayonnaise, I'm so happy I can make egg salad and deviled eggs. 

I typically eat 3 fried eggs for breakfast on a bed of spinach, sometimes with sweet potato hash browns. Now I'm starting to eat egg salad for lunch as well (with mini bell peppers and 1/2 an avocado, as yesterday's lunch went)...  Is there any reason why I can't eat eggs as my protein for 2 meals of the day? 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you and eggs get along and you're enjoying them, then go ahead and eat up. Variety is still important to get a wide range of nutrients, but you can shake it up with different proteins at dinner and, from the sound of your post, it sounds like this is only day 2 of eggs for breakfast and lunch. I'm sure you'll transition to other things as tastes and what's in the fridge changes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Count me in as a lover of eggs! Today I had a sweet potato breakfast casserole for lunch, and making a turkey frittata for dinner. :-)

 

That said, I am being cognizant of getting other proteins (meals since my start 3 days ago have included chicken breast, bison and beef).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Out of curiosity, what type of issues do eggs cause when your body doesn't like them?

 

It really depends on the individual. Some people have increased GI issues (pain, diarrhea, constipation, etc.), others might see an increase in eczema or other skin conditions, or you might see a flare up of autoimmune-related symptoms.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It really depends on the individual. Some people have increased GI issues (pain, diarrhea, constipation, etc.), others might see an increase in eczema or other skin conditions, or you might see a flare up of autoimmune-related symptoms.

 

Thanks, Munkers. I'm still working through some GI issues (bloating, constipation, feeling of fullness but never being able to go etc) but never thought of it being eggs. I used to eat eggs occasionally before but now I eat two for breakfast every day and then sometimes for dinner as well. I may try out a week egg free and see if I experience any changes.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad I found this.. during a visit back home my mother expressed some serious concern about my cholesterol intake when I told her about doing the W30.. and even though I'm eating lots of veggies, both fresh and stir fried cruciferous, and even though I'm eating more fish, both occasional apex eg salmon and more sustainable stocks like anchovies, when I told her I was eating something like 5 eggs a day..

 

Well, she worried. I'm still trying to figure this one out, but they're affordable, my body loves them(I feel great with eggs, usually 2-3 with breakfast, and 2-3 for lunch, and an animal protein of another sort for dinner), they're quick to cook..

 

I'm trying to assuage her anxiety. Not really sure how, on the cholesterol topic. But food in doesn't equal food out, eg, fat eaten doesn't just glob up and remain un-transformed. Trying to find sensible and somewhat mainstream-ish sources for her. (Ie more ideological pages like Mark's Daily Apple aren't going to help my case with her.)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's an article from the Journal of Nutrition. Of note:

 

"Furthermore, evidence has been presented showing that the current blanket recommendations regarding dietary cholesterol and egg intake are unwarranted for the majority of people and are not supported by scientific data."

 

"First, a conservative estimate suggests that only 30% of the population would respond to dietary cholesterol. It has been determined that a reduction in dietary cholesterol of 100 mg/d would only slightly decrease plasma total cholesterol levels of those who are responsive. For example, if a responsive individual chose to eat two eggs in one day they would exceed the AHA recommended upper limit for cholesterol intake by 126 mg, which would suggest that they may experience a 0.05–0.07 mmol/L increase in plasma total cholesterol levels. However, as previously mentioned, persons who consume more than one egg a day do not have a greater relative risk for CHD than those who eat only one egg a week."

 

"The reality of the situation is that although egg intake has steadily declined since the original recommendations in the 1970s, CHD is still the leading cause of death in the U.S. today. Clearly, the current guidelines are not benefiting the public as a whole and may actually have negative nutritional implications."

 

Hopefully that's  mainstream enough for your mom. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's an article from the Journal of Nutrition. Of note:

 

"Furthermore, evidence has been presented showing that the current blanket recommendations regarding dietary cholesterol and egg intake are unwarranted for the majority of people and are not supported by scientific data."

 

"First, a conservative estimate suggests that only 30% of the population would respond to dietary cholesterol. It has been determined that a reduction in dietary cholesterol of 100 mg/d would only slightly decrease plasma total cholesterol levels of those who are responsive. For example, if a responsive individual chose to eat two eggs in one day they would exceed the AHA recommended upper limit for cholesterol intake by 126 mg, which would suggest that they may experience a 0.05–0.07 mmol/L increase in plasma total cholesterol levels. However, as previously mentioned, persons who consume more than one egg a day do not have a greater relative risk for CHD than those who eat only one egg a week."

 

"The reality of the situation is that although egg intake has steadily declined since the original recommendations in the 1970s, CHD is still the leading cause of death in the U.S. today. Clearly, the current guidelines are not benefiting the public as a whole and may actually have negative nutritional implications."

 

Hopefully that's  mainstream enough for your mom. :)

So basically, if your body doesn't respond badly to one egg, then 4 or 5 isn't going to do it any more harm than one would. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

So basically, if your body doesn't respond badly to one egg, then 4 or 5 isn't going to do it any more harm than one would. 

 

That's more or less my take on it. Also, even for those people who do respond to eggs, a reduction only slightly impacts their serum cholesterol.

 

Eggs are a nutritional powerhouse AND they're relatively cheap and easy to get. In my book, unless there's a compelling reason to avoid them (like allergies or autoimmune issues), then folks should eat them. I don't think the research supports cholesterol as a compelling reason to exclude them. I'm a lot more convinced about the roles of sugar and refined carbohydrates in the elevation of cholesterol. You know the ones I'm talking about--"heart healthy whole grains" and "it comes from corn and your body can't tell the difference because sugar is sugar!"

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the egg advice. I don't eat red meat of any kind, so I am relying on eggs a lot for my protein source. I'm currently on Day 15. Was also wondering about if I'm eating too many eggs, cholesterol, etc. They don't seem to be having any negative digestive effects on me, nor am I getting sick of them. So glad to hear it's ok to keep eating them! : ) P.S. sweet potato hash browns, with fresh baby sauteed spinach, topped with fried eggs is my breakfast almost every day. I actually wake up looking forward to it! And hard boiled eggs on top of my salad at lunch too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...

Jen G   I also am a vegetarian relying on EGGs for my Whole30.  (Also discovered already cooked, deveined and de-tailed frozen shrimp at Costco)..they seem to be another quick and easy protein source depending on whether you are including any "seafood" in your diet...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Out of curiosity, what type of issues do eggs cause when your body doesn't like them?

 

If I eat too many cage eggs I get a very mild gluten-ish reaction (inflammation, sinus) sometimes. I don't have these at home usually, I think it's something they feed the chickens. Never had any problems with free range eggs. Something to be aware of if you have very mild symptoms and no trouble with chicken.

 

Some people get strong reactions (itchy is common, feeling quite sick is another) and some people who have egg problems also have chicken problems (no chicken and egg joke here). Some people react more strongly to the white (protein) than the yolk or even only to the white.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

Is there any health reason why I can't have eggs for breakfast every morning if I want to? I love sunny side up eggs and put them on spinach, mushrooms, bell peppers or whatever other veggies are on hand for variety. After so many years of avoiding them due to supposed cholesterol problems right now I feel like I could never have too many. Besides, since starting the program I feel like I spend half my time preparing meals, eating and cleaning up the kitchen, and at least eggs are quick and easy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Moderators

Nope... you can have eggs for every meal for the rest of your life should you choose.

You may want to start googling your questions using Whole30 + your question as most topics have been discussed at length so you can get lots of good info on longer threads from multiple sources.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.