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Dairy symptoms: milk but not cheese?


Allia

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Hello!

I was wondering about having different symptoms to milk and cheese. I get a headache when I drink milk, but not when I eat cheese! Is this possible?? I thought that casein caused headaches, but I don't seem to have a problem with casein...

Also, is it worth reintroducing every single thing separately? I am already separating out rice starch in coconut yogurt (seriously don't know if this is an issue) from fermented soy from normal soy... Do I need to check every sort of cheese/yogurt separately, too? Or should I just assume that I'm ok with fermented dairy? What about sweeteners and additives? It seems too cumbersome to test every sweetener separately.

I'd also like to check soy sauce, but the soy sauce I plan on consuming for later on life is the sort with wheat! Is it okay to reintroduce soy sauce in this form?

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Have you read through the Reintroduction section of the website? It's the basic way of doing things. You can definitely break it down more than that if you want to -- many people, instead of doing just one day of legumes, will do a day of soy, a day of peanuts, and a day of other legumes. Some people will break down dairy more as well, maybe doing cheese one day, milk/cream one day, and fermented dairy like yogurt or kefir one day, or they may also have separate days for cows' milk products versus goats' milk. To some degree, this is up to you, and depends on what exactly you're wanting to accomplish. If you know or suspect that you have some issues with dairy, you may do very detailed reintro for dairy, to determine exactly which things affect you in what ways. If you rarely have any legumes anyway, you may just do one day of whatever mix of legumes you're most likely to use (soy latte at breakfast, peanut butter at lunch, and some kind of beans at dinner, for instance), but if you know you want to go back to including soy regularly, you may want to do a whole day of soy products.

 

Different types of dairy can cause different reactions in different people. Some have more lactose or more casein, if they're fermented they're going to be different -- so it's not unusual that you had different reactions to different things.

 

For your soy sauce with wheat, I would probably do your gluten grain reintroduction and your soy reintroduction before you do that soy sauce -- that way if you have a strong reaction to either of those, you can either decide whether you want to look for a substitute that doesn't contain that, or whether you want to try that particular soy sauce anyway.

 

In general, keep in mind that if there's something you know you won't ever eat again, or that you already know you have some kind of sensitivity to, you don't have to reintroduce it. If someone knows they're lactose intolerant, for instance, there's no particular reason for them to reintroduce a big glass of milk. If they want to try out lower-lactose options to see exactly how they react, that's up to them, but they definitely don't have to.

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Have you read through the Reintroduction section of the website? It's the basic way of doing things. You can definitely break it down more than that if you want to -- many people, instead of doing just one day of legumes, will do a day of soy, a day of peanuts, and a day of other legumes. Some people will break down dairy more as well, maybe doing cheese one day, milk/cream one day, and fermented dairy like yogurt or kefir one day, or they may also have separate days for cows' milk products versus goats' milk. To some degree, this is up to you, and depends on what exactly you're wanting to accomplish. If you know or suspect that you have some issues with dairy, you may do very detailed reintro for dairy, to determine exactly which things affect you in what ways. If you rarely have any legumes anyway, you may just do one day of whatever mix of legumes you're most likely to use (soy latte at breakfast, peanut butter at lunch, and some kind of beans at dinner, for instance), but if you know you want to go back to including soy regularly, you may want to do a whole day of soy products.

 

Different types of dairy can cause different reactions in different people. Some have more lactose or more casein, if they're fermented they're going to be different -- so it's not unusual that you had different reactions to different things.

 

For your soy sauce with wheat, I would probably do your gluten grain reintroduction and your soy reintroduction before you do that soy sauce -- that way if you have a strong reaction to either of those, you can either decide whether you want to look for a substitute that doesn't contain that, or whether you want to try that particular soy sauce anyway.

 

In general, keep in mind that if there's something you know you won't ever eat again, or that you already know you have some kind of sensitivity to, you don't have to reintroduce it. If someone knows they're lactose intolerant, for instance, there's no particular reason for them to reintroduce a big glass of milk. If they want to try out lower-lactose options to see exactly how they react, that's up to them, but they definitely don't have to.

Thank you, I understand now. Do I need to avoid carrageenan and other things on those days when I add stuff back? :x I also have a question about reactions; I struggle with constipation. When I reintroduced rice, my stomach felt a bit uncomfortable and "bloated," but I never get actually physically bloated (like my gut doesn't expand ever). I just felt a bit "acidic" (?) and uncomfortable... But I don't know if it's because of the rice because sometimes I can just be uncomfortable without rice. Should I try to do reintros again?

It also sort of worries me that I have never felt more lethargic due to eating foods, save for wheat. However, I sleep every day at 2 am anyway and am a very busy student. Am I doing something that invalidates my reintroduction?

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It is very important to avoid everything that is off-plan during reintroductions with the exception of the food you are reintroducing. If you don't, you cloud the information about your response to the food in question and may not get an accurate picture of how a specific food effects you. For example, the gut irritation of carrageenan mixed with whatever food you are reintroducing may cause problems that you would not experience with the food alone. 

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