Store bought broth


Wanda705

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Does anyone know if a compliant broth like Pacific brand has the same health benefits as homemade broth? Im primarily concerned about the anti inflammatory properties from the gelatin. I dont want to lose out on that by using store bought, but all my attempts to make it myself have failed. Any thoughts?

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Thank you, that would be great.  :)  The method Ive used a few times now is to roast a whole raw chicken in my crockpot and when its cooked, I take the meat off and put the bones back in the pot with a little vinegar, seasonings, hard veggies like celery and carrot, and fill to capacity with water.  I let that cook on low for about a day or so.  I will also say that I am probably a little haphazard and allow alot of the skin and meat back into the pot as well. 

 

When its done I strain it twice and put it into mason jars.  It has never gelled up upon cooling like its supposed to do, so I feel like maybe the bones are too small... or I'm not cooking it long enough.  And it never tastes right.  Your thoughts?

 

 

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Hmm ... when you say it's never gelled upon cooling, do you mean once you've put it in the refrigerator?  I let mine cool down, uncovered on the kitchen counter first, then refrigerate, uncovered, until the fat appears/solidifies on the top (takes several hours).  Once the fat appears, I skim it off, then cover the container and put it back in the refrigerator. It's after that, that I notice the broth starts to gel.

Also, I wonder if you're using too much water?  I just put enough water in the pot to cover the bones and other contents, not fill the cooking pot.

I've only made bone broth with raw beef bones, not chicken bones.  I use 3 lbs of bones to make about a gallon of broth on my stove-top (after an initial boil, I usually let it simmer on low for about 17-18 hours). 
 

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My chicken broth never gels, but when I use beef bones, it does. Beef bones just have more of the collagen and stuff than chicken bones do. That doesn't mean your chicken broth isn't good for you -- I personally am more likely to drink chicken broth on its own, but don't care for beef broth on its own. I do use it in recipes, but the flavor on its own is just too much for me, even though I actually like beef.

 

I have read, but haven't tried yet, that if you can find chicken feet at the store, adding them in to the broth will help it to gel. It is also possible that if you added more chicken bones, it might be more likely to gel, although even when I've added leftover leg and thigh bones from previous meals, mine still doesn't gel.

 

(Also, I say beef or chicken broth here in this post, but you can make broth from any bones, and you can mix them in the same pot of broth. I tend to keep the chicken bones I save separate from everything else in the freezer so I can make straight chicken broth, but any other bones I have, beef, lamb, pork, whatever, I put together, and make a combo broth with them when I have enough.)

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Hi Wanda705! If you search for "broth" on the forums, and just pick the ones that have "broth" in the title, you'll find a lot of information about the various forms of broth. I don't think there is any such thing as a failed broth. It's runny, or not. It gelled, or it didn't. It tastes good, or it's bland, or it's too strongly flavoured. Etc. It's never "wrong" or failed; it's just different. It's still water + the nutrients from bones.... never a bad thing no matter how it turned out.

 

Good luck.

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I was never thrilled with how my own broth turned out. Then I discovered Tom Denham's method, and it turns out the veggies were ruining it for me. If you have a pressure cooker, give this a try:

http://www.wholelifeeating.com/2012/02/pressure-cooker-bone-broth/

If you don't have a pressure cooker, I highly recommend getting one. I got my Instant Pot last Christmas and can't live without it now. Check Amazon because it usually goes on sale around this time. Wait to buy it when it's 50% or more off.

Note: Tom's recipe uses a stove top pressure cooker. If you use a plug-in kind, like an Instant Pot, i would increase the cook time to 90 minutes.

Also, like Shannon, I dont like to mix my fowl bones with my beef, lamb and pork bones.

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